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MAY 1 982 




.■••'•■■■.•■ 



BOSTON COLLEGE BULLETIN 
UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 
1 982-83 



ALLBm* ' 




Boston College Bulletin 

Undergraduate Catalog 1982-83 



Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02167 

617-969-0100 



Boston College Bulletin 

The Boston College Bulletin contains current information regard- 
ing the University calendar, admissions, degree requirements, 
fees, regulations and course offerings. It is not intended to be and 
should not be relied upon as a statement of the University's con- 
tractual undertakings. 

Boston College reserves the right in its sole judgment to make 
changes of any nature in its program, calendar or academic sched- 
ule whenever it is deemed necessary or desirable, including 
changes in course content, the rescheduling of classes with or 
without extending the academic term, cancelling of scheduled 
classes and other academic activities, and requiring or affording 
alternatives for scheduled classes or other academic activities, in 
any such case giving such notice thereof as is reasonably prac- 
ticable under the circumstances. 

The Boston College Bulletin is published six times a year in 
April, May, July 1, July 15, August and October. 

Boston College is committed to providing equal opportunity in 



Volume LII, Number 4, May, 1982 

education and in employment regardless of race, sex, marital or 
parental status, religion, age, national origin or physical/mental 
handicap. As an employer, Boston College is in compliance with 
the various laws and regulations requiring equal opportunity and 
affirmative action in employment, such as Title VII of the Civil 
Rights Act and Federal Executive Order #11246. Boston College's 
policy of equal educational opportunity is in compliance with 
the guidelines and requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights 
Act, Title IX of the Higher Education Amendments Act of 1972, 
and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 

The Registrar's Office wishes to thank the Office of Commu- 
nications for permission to use their pictures throughout this 
publication. 

USPS-389-750 

Second-class postage paid at Boston, Massachusetts 02109. 

Postmaster: send PS Form 3579 to Boston College Registrar's 
Office, Lyons 101, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167. 



Table of Contents 



BOSTON COLLEGE 

The University 5 

Undergraduate Education 5 

Accreditation of the University 5 

The Libraries 5 

The Campus 5 

Equal Opportunity in Education 5 

Confidentiality of Student Records 6 

Tuition and Fees 6 

Withdrawals and Refunds 6 

Admissions Information 7 

Financial Aid 8 

Student Services 9 

Academic Regulations 11 

Special Programs (Non-degree) 12 

Cross-Registration Program 12 

Junior Year Abroad 12 

Irish Studies at University College Cork 12 

The Pulse Program 12 

Course Numbers and Codes 13 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Academic Regulations 15 

Special Academic Programs 17 

The Honors Program 17 

Scholar of the College 17 

Department Honors 17 

Independent Major 17 

Bachelor of Arts-Master of Social Work Program 18 

Bachelor's-Master's Program 18 

Minor in Secondary Education 18 

Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental Program 18 

Greycliff Language House 18 

Special Interdisciplinary Programs 18 

American Studies 18 

Archaeological Expedition to Cyprus 19 

Black Studies 19 

Cambridge Humanities Seminar 19 



Center for East Europe, Russia and Asia 19 

Environmental Studies 19 

The Immersion Program in French 19 

Irish Studies 20 

Medieval Studies 20 

Middle Eastern Studies 20 

Program for the Study of Peace and War 20 

Women's Studies 21 

Senior Awards and Honors 21 

Areas of Major Study 21 

Biology 21 

Chemistry 24 

Classical Studies 26 

Computer Science 28 

Economics 29 

English 31 

Fine Arts 37 

Art History 38 

Studio Art 38 

Geology and Geophysics 42 

Germanic Studies 47 

History 48 

Linguistics 54 

Mathematics 55 

Music 58 

Philosophy 59 

Physics 68 

Political Science 71 

Psychology 77 

Romance Languages and Literatures 82 

French 83 

Italian 84 

Spanish 85 

Courses Offered in English 86 

Bi-Lingual Education Courses 86 

Slavic Studies 86 

Sociology 89 

Speech Communication and Theatre 93 



Speech Communication 

Theatre 

Speech Pathology and Audiology 
Theology 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Academic Regulations 

Awards and Honors 

Majors in Education 

Early Childhood 

Elementary Education 

Middle School Education 

Secondary Education 

Human Development 

Moderate Special Needs 

Severe Special Needs 

Special Alternative Environments 

Early Childhood and Special Education 
Minors and Concentrations 

Minor in Arts and Sciences 

Minor in Secondary Education 

Minor in Middle School Education 

Minor in Health Education 

Minor in Speech Science 

Concentration in Bilingual Education 

Concentration in Early Childhood Education 

Concentration in Computer Usage 

Concentration in Education of the Gifted . . . 

Concentration in Mathematics Education . . . 

Concentration in Media and the Fine Arts . . 

Concentration in Reading 

Faculty 

Course Offerings 



SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT 

Objectives 

Requirements for the Degree . 
Academic Regulations 



94 
97 
99 
99 



111 
113 
113 
113 
114 
114 
114 
115 
115 
115 
116 
116 
116 
116 
116 
116 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
118 
118 
118 
118 
118 
119 



127 
127 
128 



Special Programs 128 

Management Honors Program 128 

Pre-Professional Studies for Law 128 

Loyola Lectures 129 

Senior Awards and Honors 129 

Accounting 129 

Administrative Sciences 130 

Business Law 131 

Computer Science 132 

Economics 134 

Finance 134 

General Management 136 

Honors Program 137 

Marketing 137 

Organization Studies— Human Resources 

Management 139 

Quantitative Analysis 141 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Philosophy and Objectives 145 

Requirements for the Degree 145 

Curriculum Plan 146 

Registered Nurse Candidates 146 

Academic Regulations 146 

Special Academic Programs 147 

General Information 147 

Faculty 148 

Teaching and Resource Personnel 148 

Course Offerings 149 

EVENING COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 151 

SUMMER SESSION 151 

ADMINISTRATION 152 

CAMPUS MAP 154 

DIRECTORY AND OFFICE LOCATIONS 156 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1982-83 157 



Boston College 









Boston College / 5 



The University 

Having been granted its charter in 1863 by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, Boston College is one of the oldest Jesuit- 
founded universities in the United States. 

During its first fifty years the college was located in the City 
of Boston. Shortly before World War I, property was acquired in 
Chestnut Hill and the college was relocated to this suburban com- 
munity six miles west of Boston. 

During the more than fifty years since its relocation the growth 
of Boston College into today's University was particularly evident 
during the 1920's. The Summer Session, the Graduate School of 
Arts and Sciences, the Law School, and the Evening College were 
added in rapid succession to the original College of Arts and 
Sciences. In 1927, the College of Liberal Arts at Lenox and the 
Schools of Philosophy and Theology at Weston were established 
as academic units of the University. The Graduate School of So- 
cial Work was established in 1936, and the College of Business 
Administration in 1938. The latter, and its Graduate School which 
was established in 1957, is now known as the School of Man- 
agement. The Schools of Nursing and Education were founded, 
respectively, in 1947 and 1952. 



Undergraduate Education 

In our idealistic moments we call a college a community of schol- 
ars. The phrase implies that not only do collegians meld them- 
selves into a social and academic whole, but that faculty members 
and administrators join students in forming an integral and dis- 
cernible community. Boston College is such a community. The 
members develop, in conjunction with persons who have similar 
high hopes for humanity, those distinctive values which the 
Christian tradition can generate when it is in contact with the 
real problems of contemporary experiences. 



Accreditation of the University 

Boston College is a member of, or accredited by, the following 
educational institutions: The American Association of Colleges 
of Nursing, the American Association of Colleges for Teacher 
Education, the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Busi- 
ness, the American Association of University Women, the Amer- 
ican Bar Association, the American Chemical Society, the American 
Council on Education, the Association of American Colleges, the 
Association of American Law Schools, the Association for Con- 
tinuing Higher Education, the Association of Urban Universities, 
the Board of Regents of the University of New York, the College 
Entrance Examination Board, the Council of Graduate Schools, 
the Council on Social Work Education, the Association of Jesuit 
Colleges and Universities, the International Association of Uni- 
versities, the International Association of Catholic Universities, 
the Interstate Certification Compact, the National Catholic Edu- 
cation Association, the National League for Nursing, the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges, the National Coun- 
cil for Accreditation of Teacher Education, Phi Beta Kappa, and 
other similar organizations. 



The Libraries 

The Boston College Libraries offer a wealth of resources and serv- 
ices to support the teaching and research activities of the uni- 
versity. The book collections are approaching a total of one 
million volumes, and approximately 9,000 serial titles are cur- 
rently received. 

Membership in two academic consortia, the Boston Library 
Consortium and the Boston Theological Institute, adds still 
greater dimensions to the resources of the Boston College Li- 
braries, providing Boston College faculty and graduate students 
who have special research needs access to the millions of volumes 
and other services of the member institutions. 

Through membership in New England Library Information 
Network (NELINET), there is on-line access to publishing, cata- 
loging and interlibrary loan location from the OCLC, Inc. data 



base, which contains over eight million records from the Library 
of Congress and from more than 2,700 contributing institutions. 

A recent and growing development has been the provision of 
customized computer searching of a wide range of data bases in 
the humanities and social sciences, science, and business. 

Information on use of the libraries is contained in the Guide 
to the Boston College Libraries and other leaflets and pamphlets 
available in the libraries. 

Bapst Library, the main library for the university, contains the 
research collection in the humanities, social sciences, and edu- 
cation. There are approximately 500,000 volumes, 4,135 active 
serials, a large collection of government documents, and an ex- 
cellent collection of reference and bibliographic works. Outstand- 
ing special collections include the Hilaire Belloc Collection, the 
Francis Thompson Collection, the Irish Collection, the Congress- 
man Robert Drinan Archives, Jesuitana, the Nicholas M. Williams 
Memorial Ethnological Collection, the Morrissey Memorial Col- 
lection of Japanese prints, and the Liturgical Collection. 

The School of Nursing Library, one of the outstanding nursing 
libraries in the country, is the major campus resource for the 
literature of the health sciences. The collection of 34,000 volumes, 
620 periodicals, pamphlets, doctoral dissertations and microform 
provides comprehensive coverage of nursing, with selective cov- 
erage of medicine and related topics. The Frederick J. Kennedy 
Learning Resource Center accommodates audiovisuals in the 
same subject areas. 

The Science Library serving the departments of biology, chem- 
istry, geology and geophysics, mathematics, and physics, has 
holdings of more than 56,000 volumes with 560 periodical sub- 
scriptions and most of the important scientific indexes. A spec- 
ialized collection of more than 11,000 volumes and nearly 100 
periodicals on Earth Sciences is located in the Geophysics Library 
at Weston Observatory. 

The School of Social Work Library contains a collection of ap- 
proximately 28,000 volumes and over 350 periodical titles, gov- 
ernment documents, pamphlets and theses. Materials serve 
professional social work; case work, social planning, child and 
family welfare, community organization, research and adminis- 
tration. Voluntary agency publications comprise much of the 
pamphlet collection. 

The School of Management Library has special subject strengths 
in banking, economics, investment, marketing, and computer sci- 
ence. The over 60,000 volumes include trade directories, invest- 
ment manuals and services, government publications, and 900 
business periodicals. There is also a large collection of corporate 
annual reports and census files. 

The Law School Library, located on the Newton Campus, is a 
well-rounded collection of legal and related materials in excess 
of 125,000 volumes. The collection is basically Anglo-American 
in character but has substantial and growing collections of inter- 
national, comparative and foreign law materials. 

The Resource Center, presently sharing the library facility at the 
Newton Campus with the Law School Library, has over 15,000 
volumes, strong in the fine arts, with a significant record collec- 
tion. 



The Campus 

Located on the border between the city of Boston and the suburb 
of Newton, Boston College derives benefits from its proximity to 
a large metropolitan city and its setting in a residential suburb. 
Often cited as a model of university planning, the campus is 
spread over more than 200 acres of tree-covered Chestnut Hill. 
Yet it is just a few miles from culturally and socially rich Boston. 

The Chestnut Hill campus is tri-level. Dormitories are on the 
upper campus; classroom, laboratory, administrative and student 
service facilities are on the middle campus; and the lower campus 
includes modular and apartment residences as well as recrea- 
tional and parking facilities. 

The Newton campus is a 40-acre tract located one and one-half 
miles from the Chestnut Hill campus. It also contains classrooms, 
dormitories, athletic areas and student service facilities. 

Equal Opportunity in Education 

Boston College is an academic community whose doors are open 



6 / Boston College 

ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 



to all students without regard to race, religion, age, sex, marital 
or parental status, national origin, or handicap. Opportunities 
and experiences are offered to all students on an equal basis and 
in such a way as to recognize and appreciate their individual and 
cultural differences. This policy of equal opportunity and non- 
discrimination in education underlies all of the graduate and 
undergraduate programs and services of the University, including 
admissions, financial aid, housing, access to all course offerings, 
extracurricular programs and activities, athletics, counseling and 
testing, health services and all other student services. The Uni- 
versity's Office of Affirmative Action coordinates the implemen- 
tation of this policy and is available as a resource to all students 
as well as faculty and staff. 



Confidentiality of Student Records 

As a matter of necessity, Boston College continuously records a 
large number of specific items relating to its students. This in- 
formation is necessary to support its educational programs as 
well as to administer housing, athletics and extracurricular pro- 
grams. The College also maintains certain records such as em- 
ployment, financial and accounting information for its own use 
and to comply with state and federal regulations. Boston College 
has committed itself to protect the privacy rights of its students 
and to maintain the confidentiality of its records. In addition, the 
College endorses and complies with the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (the Buckley Amendment), a fed- 
eral statute which requires that students be permitted to review 
records in their files and offers them the possibility of correcting 
errors which they may discover. Students or others seeking more 
complete information regarding their specific rights and respon- 
sibilities of the University will find copies of the Family Edu- 
cational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 and the rules and 
regulations for compliance with the Act on file in the University 
Library or in the Office of University Policies and Procedures in 
More Hall. 

The College routinely makes available to the general public 
directory information on its students in the following categories: 
a student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of 
birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized 
activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic 
teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, the most 
recent previous educational agency or institution attended, and 
other similar information. Unless advised to the contrary, the 
School will make this information available. A student who so 
wishes has the absolute right to prevent release of this informa- 
tion. In order to do so, the student must complete a form re- 
questing nondisclosure of directory information. These forms are 
on file in the Registrar's Office and should be filled out at the 
beginning of each semester for which they are to be enforced. 

Tuition and Fees 

First semester tuition and fees are due by August 15, 1982. 

Tuition first semester $3,000.00 
Second semester tuition and fees are due by December 15, 1982. 

Tuition second semester — $3,000.00 

There is a $100.00 late processing fee for payments received 
for first semester after October 1, 1982 and for second semester 
after February 11, 1983. There will be absolutely no registration 
or confirmation of registration allowed after December 9, 1982 
for first semester and May 2, 1983 for second semester. 

Payment should be made by check or postal money order and 
mailed to the Controller's Office. Scholarship holders are not 
exempt from payment of registration, acceptance deposits, in- 
surance and fees at the time prescribed. 



Undergraduate General Fees 

Application Fee (not refundable) 



Acceptance Deposit. Applicable to the last semester 
tuition. If a student does not enter in the year for 
which the fee is paid or does not formally with- 
draw before July 1 for first semester, or December 
1 for second semester, the fee is forfeited. This 



$ 30.00 



100.00 



deposit is not refundable to any student who has 

not completed at least one semester. 

Health Fee 112.00 

Identification Card 6.00 

Late Confirmation of Registration 40.00 

Late Registration 25.00 

Recreation Fee — payable annually 60.00 

Registration for new students (not refundable) .... 25.00 

Tuition — payable semi-annually 6000.00 

Undergraduate Special Fees 

Absentee Examination $ 20.00 

Certificates, Transcripts 2.00 

Extra Course — per semester hour credit 200.00 

Field Placement Fee 20.00 

Graduation Fee 25.00 

Laboratory Fee — per semester 8.00-72.00 

Nursing Malpractice Fee 15.00 

Special Students — per semester hour credit 200.00 

Undergraduate Government Fee 30.00 

Resident Student Expenses 

Board per semester 800.00 

Room Fee (includes Mail Service) per semester varies varies 

from $755.00-940.00 depending on room 

Room Guarantee Deposit 100.00 

Health Fee 112.00 



Acceleration 

Full-time undergraduate students authorized by the Dean's Office 
to take accelerated programs leading to an early graduation will 
be billed by Student Accounts for extra courses taken during a 
regular semester at the rate of one-fifth of a semester's tuition for 
each extra course. This will be in addition to the "flat rate" tuition 
charge covering a normal load (four courses per semester as a 
senior; five courses per semester prior to senior year). No addi- 
tional fee will be assessed for extra courses taken for enrichment 
purposes only, and not to accelerate a degree program. However, 
when a student who has taken extra courses for enrichment later 
wishes to use those courses for acceleration, a fee will be assessed 
based on the tuition rate that was in effect when the courses were 
taken. Whenever a student has been given approval to take Boston 
College summer courses for acceleration, he/she will pay the reg- 
ular Summer Session tuition for those courses. 

The Trustees of Boston College reserve the right to change the 
tuition rates and to make additional charges within the University 
whenever such action is deemed necessary. 



Withdrawals and Refunds 

Fees are not refundable. 

Undergraduate tuition is cancelled subject to the following con- 
ditions: 

1) Notice of withdrawal must be made in writing to: 

University Registrar 

Boston College 

Lyons 101 

Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02167 

2) The date of receipt of written notice of withdrawal by the 
University Registrar determines the amount of tuition can- 
celled. 

3) The cancellation schedule shown below will apply to students 
withdrawing voluntarily, as well as to students who are dis- 
missed from the University for academic or disciplinary rea- 



sons. 

First Semester 
by Sept. 17, 1982 
by Sept. 24, 1982 
by Oct. 1, 1982 
by Oct. 8, 1982 



Second Semester 

Jan. 28, 1983 80% of tuition charged is cancelled 
Feb. 4, 1983 60% of tuition charged is cancelled 
Feb. 11, 1983 40% of tuition charged is cancelled 
Feb. 18, 1983 20% of tuition charged is cancelled 



Boston College / 7 

ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 



No cancellations are made after the 5th week of classes. 

If a student does not wish to leave any resulting credit balance 
in his or her account for subsequent use, he or she should request 
the Student Accounts Office in writing to issue a rebate. 

Federal regulations issued by the Office of Education estab- 
lished procedural guidelines applicable to the treatment of re- 
funds whenever the affected student has been the recipient of 
financial assistance through any program authorized under Title 
IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965. These guidelines pertain 
to the National Direct Student Loan, the Pell Grant, the Supple- 
mental Educational Opportunity Grant, the College Work-Study, 
and the Guaranteed Student Loan programs. In such cases, the 
regulations require that a portion of any refund be returned to the 
Title IV Program. Further, if a student withdraws, the institution 
must determine if any cash disbursements of Title IV funds, made 
directly to the student by the institution for non-instructional 
purposes, is an overpayment that must be repaid to the Title IV 
program. University policy developed to comply with the regu- 
lations at Boston College will be available upon request from the 
Financial Aid Office. 



Admissions Information 

Boston College is an academic community whose doors are open 
to men and women regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, 
religion, age, or handicap. 

Boston College seeks to maintain an undergraduate student 
body which represents a broad variety of abilities, backgrounds, 
and interests. In selecting students, therefore, the Committee on 
Admissions looks for demonstrated evidence of academic ability, 
intellectual curiosity, strength of character, motivation, energy, 
and promise for personal growth and development. Requests for 
financial aid do not affect decisions on admission. Application 
forms and information bulletins may be obtained from the Un- 
dergraduate Admissions Office, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, 
Massachusetts 02167. 

Admission From Secondary School 

Although secondary school preparation varies, the recommended 

units are: 

English 4 

Foreign Language 2 

Algebra 2 

Plane Geometry 1 

Lab Science 2 

Applicants to the School of Nursing must complete at least two 

years of a lab science, including unit of Chemistry. 

Entrance Examination 

The following tests of the College Entrance Examination Board 
(CEEB) must be completed by each applicant no later than January 
of the senior year: 

Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) 

Achievement Tests in: 

1. English 

2. Mathematics Level I or II 

3. Third Test of the applicant's own choice 

The SAT may be taken in either the Junior or the Senior year. 
The Committee on Admissions will select the best combination 
of test scores when evaluating an application. 



Usually only those transfer applicants who have maintained 
a grade point average of 2.5 or higher will be considered for 
transfer to Boston College. Credits will be accepted for transfer 
only for courses which are equivalent to those offered at Boston 
College. 

Admissions-in-transfer are granted for the fall term beginning 
in September and for the spring term beginning in January . 

The residency and tuition requirements for transfer students 
will be determined by the number of successfully completed se- 
mesters at the former school, not the number of courses trans- 
ferred in. 

Transfer students are required to complete a minimum of two 
years work (the equivalent of 18 courses or 54 semester credit 
hours) at Boston College in order to qualify for an undergraduate 
degree from the University. 

Transfer students admitted to sophomore status or above may 
not accelerate the academic program for completion of degree 
requirements assigned by the Admissions Office at the time of 
their acceptance to Boston College. However, transfer students 
may, with prior approval, carry overload courses to make up 
deficiencies or to complete the number of courses appropriate to 
their assigned status. 

Please consult the Undergraduate Admissions Bulletin for in- 
formation on application deadlines, financial aid, and specific 
restrictions on the transfer of credit to particular undergraduate 
divisions. Candidates who are accepted will at the same time be 
notified of the terms of admission and credits to be allowed in 
transfer. 

Special Students 

Only those persons who wish to be enrolled as full-time day 
students and candidates for the baccalaureate program for reg- 
istered nurses are admitted by the Office of Undergraduate Ad- 
missions. Students in the baccalaureate program for registered 
nurses are encouraged to enroll full-time, but part-time study for 
individual semesters may be arranged by permission of the Dean 
of the School of Nursing. All other students wishing to attend 
Boston College on a part-time basis, for either day or evening 
classes, should contact: Dean of the Evening College, Fulton Hall, 
Room 317, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167. 

Advanced Placement 

Boston College participates in the Advanced Placement Program 
of the College Entrance Examination Board. Applicants interested 
in advanced placement with credit should make arrangements to 
take the Advanced Placement Tests given by the C.E.E.B. in May 
of each year. The tests may be taken in the junior as well as the 
senior year of high school. 

Advanced placement can also be earned for college courses 
completed at an accredited institution prior to enrollment at Bos- 
ton College in which the student has earned a grade of "C" or 
better. Official college transcripts of these courses should be for- 
warded to the Admissions Office by August 1. 

Should a student earn 18 or more credits, whether through 
superior performance on a minimum of three A. P. tests or through 
acceptance of at least six three-credit courses or any combination 
of these two methods, he/she will be eligible for sophomore stand- 
ing. Should less than 18 credits be earned, the student can still 
be excused from core requirements; however, electives must be 
substituted for these core courses. Thirty-eight courses will still 
be required for graduation from Boston College. 



Admission by Transfer 

Candidates for admission-in-transfer to Boston College from an- 
other college or university should follow the procedure for regular 
application to the freshman class. In addition transfer applicants 
must submit the following credentials: 

1. A letter from the candidate stating his or her reason for 
transfer to Boston College. 

2. A complete official transcript of all courses taken in all se- 
mesters at other colleges or universities. A statement of honorable 
separation from such institutions should be included. 

3. A course catalogue from the applicant's college or university. 



Early Admission 

Under the Early Admission Program, outstandingly gifted and 
highly motivated high school juniors are sometimes admitted to 
Boston College one year early. Early Admission candidates must 
obtain from their high school a letter stating that either they have 
completed all their requirements for graduation, or that they will 
receive their diploma after the freshman year at Boston College. 
All Early Admission candidates are required to arrange for a per- 
sonal interview at Boston College. Decisions on Early Admission 
applications are made after the receipt of the final grades in the 
junior year. 



8 / Boston College 

FINANCIAL AID 



Minority Admissions Information 

Boston College welcomes applications from students of all back- 
grounds and cultures. The Minority Admissions Program is re- 
sponsible for the recruitment, processing and evaluation of all 
applications from Black, Asian-American, Hispanic, and Native 
American students. Applications are read in light of the appli- 
cant's cultural and educational background. 

A Transitional Summer Program has been established for a 
select group of students who may have some educational dis- 
advantages, but who do show some academic potential and mo- 
tivation. Students who enter Boston College through the 
Transitional Summer Program are selected by the Minority Ad- 
missions Program. 

International Student Admissions 

Boston College welcomes the International applicant. The Inter- 
national Student Admissions Program is responsible for the re- 
cruitment, processing and evaluation of all international 
applications. Students are expected to submit the same creden- 
tials (transcripts, recommendations, etc.) as American applicants. 
Any international student whose native language is not English 
is required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) exam. All documents should be submitted in English. 
If the credentials must be translated the original must be sub- 
mitted along with the translation. 



Financial Aid 

Boston College administers a variety of assistance programs to 
help students finance their education when their own and their 
families' resources are inadequate for this purpose. It is a fun- 
damental principle of financial aid, however, that the student's 
first resource must be his or her own earning capacity, followed 
by the income and assets of his or her immediate family. 

To enable the college to make a proper judgment as to the 
amount and kind of assistance for which a student is eligible, a 
copy of the tax return and a Financial Aid Form (FAF) must be 
filed along with the Boston College Financial Aid Application 
each year. 

Boston College policy states all students who receive financial 
assistance from or through Boston College are required to file the 
FAF and B.C. Application. 

The College's estimate of a student's need is based on an anal- 
ysis of information supplied on the Financial Aid Form and tax 
return. Frequently, various forms of assistance must be combined 
to meet the student's need. In the event that an applicant receives 
other assistance after aid has been awarded, the college may be 
required to adjust the total amount of aid accordingly. All finan- 
cial aid resources are limited, and it is our intent to use these 
resources in such a way that the greatest number will benefit. 
Students are required to report outside awards which they obtain. 

Students are expected to save $700-$900 from summer earn- 
ings each year. We also expect all undergraduates who are Mas- 
sachusetts residents to file for a Massachusetts State Scholarship. 
Students from other states which have a State Scholarship Pro- 
gram are also expected to apply. Undergraduate students applying 
for aid of any kind are required to apply for a Pell Grant before 
their application for other types of aid will be considered. 

Most financial aid available at Boston College (whether insti- 
tutional, federal or state) is awarded primarily on the basis of 
financial need, possibly combined with academic performance 
or potential or some other skill. Need is determined by using the 
forms indicated above and is re-examined annually. Students 
with the greatest need are generally given preference for most 
financial aid programs and thus tend to receive larger financial 
aid packages. 

All financial aid recipients must be maintaining satisfactory 
progress in their course of study. Satisfactory academic progress 
is defined by the dean of each school at B.C. Students should 
check with their respective deans for this definition. If a student 
is not maintaining satisfactory academic progress, the student 
should consult with his or her dean to determine what steps must 
be taken to reestablish his or her status and, thus, eligibility to 
receive financial aid. 



Specific information on the various programs, the conditions 
and procedures governing financial aid awards, and the various 
financial aid deadline dates, can be found in the chapter entitled 
"Policies and Procedures" of the Boston College Student Guide, 
or in the Boston College Financial Aid Application, the Boston 
College Financial Aid Award Letter, the Financial Aid Brochure, 
and the Financial Aid Dates and Deadlines Letter. Students are 
expected to be familiar with the contents of these sources as well 
as the other materials or documents which may be distributed by 
the Boston College Financial Aid Office. 

Every student who receives funds through one or more of the 
five federal student aid programs must complete the affidavit on 
the B.C. application form stating that all funds received through 
these programs will be used solely for educationally related pur- 
poses, and attesting to or confirming his/her understanding of 
various other conditions. 

The following types of aid are available individually or in com- 
bination: 

Boston College Scholarships/Grants 
(Undergraduates Only) 

These are based on need combined with academic performance 
or potential or some other skill and are designated for incoming 
freshmen with renewal contingent upon maintenance of the con- 
ditions under which the award was originally granted. Scholar- 
ships or grants which are lost or forfeited by the original recipients 
can be awarded to other upperclassmen. 

Scholarships and grants may be increased from available funds 
if university costs increase. Such funds are used to aid new re- 
cipients as well as to increase existing awards to students whose 
need has risen. 

Scholarship and grant recipients must maintain cumulative 
averages of 2.5 and 2.0, respectively. 

Pell Grants 
(Undergraduates Only) 

If fully funded, Pell will provide to all eligible students a grant 
of up to $1750 based on a student aid index. The student aid 
index is computed on the basis of parental and student income 
and assets, as well as family size and number in college. All 
undergraduate students are required to apply if they are at least 
half time and if they are applicants for other aid. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants 
(Undergraduates Only) 

These are grants made available from federal funds. Grants range 
from $200 to $2000 per year and may be renewable upon reap- 
plication as long as need continues. 

National Direct (formerly Defense) Student Loans 

Amounts awarded are based on need. Undergraduates are limited 
to a combined total of $3,000 for the first two years and a com- 
bined total of $6,000 for all undergraduate years. Graduate stu- 
dents are limited to a combined total of $12,000 for undergraduate 
and graduate years. 

The loan is interest free until repayment begins, six months 
after graduation. The interest charge is 5% on first-time loans 
disbursed after October 1, 1981. 

Some students' loans may be subject to previous interest rates: 
prior to October 1, 1980 interest was 3%; October 1, 1980 an 
interest rate of 4% became effective. 

Deferment or cancellation is allowed under certain conditions. 
Information on deferment and cancellation provisions can be ob- 
tained by contacting the Student Loan Office, More Hall 302. 

Nursing Student Loans 

At least half-time students may apply for up to $2,500 per aca- 
demic year. Amounts awarded will be based on student's need. 
No interest is charged on loans until repayment period begins. 
A repayment period of 10 years is permitted with interest of 6% 
charged on the unpaid balance. Repayment period begins 9 
months after graduation with a period of deferral allowed for time 
spent in full-time graduate study, active duty in military service, 
or Peace Corps service. 



Boston College / 9 

STUDENT SERVICES 



Loans disbursed prior to August 13, 1981 carried an interest 
rate of 3%. 

Nursing students are encouraged to seek other sources of loans 
(e.g. HELP) due to limitations of funds in this program. 

College Work-Study 

With the assistance of Federal funds, the Financial Aid Office is 
able to provide to at least half-time students employment oppor- 
tunities either on the campus or in various public or private non- 
profit off-campus agencies. Students are limited by B.C. to 15-20 
hours per week during the school year and 35-40 hours per week 
during the summer or other school vacations and are paid on a 
weekly basis. Eligibility is based on need and earnings must be 
related to total educational costs. Students must be awarded 
Work-Study by the Financial Aid Office for each work period 
before they can be authorized for employment by the Student 
Employment Office. For more information on this process, please 
consult the list of important dates and deadlines published by 
the Financial Aid Office. 

Student Employment Program 

Some opportunities are provided for part-time employment 
throughout the school year. The limitation on hours makes it 
unlikely that students can earn more than a portion of tuition 
during the course of the year in this fashion. 

Since all on-campus regular employment of any kind must be 
counted as a resource, students receiving other financial aid 
should check with the Financial Aid Office to be sure that ad- 
ditional earnings will not jeopardize the other financial aid 
awards. 

Students should consult the Student Employment Office, for 
more employment information. 

State Scholarships 

Depending upon the individual state regulations, most under- 
graduate and some graduate students may apply. Students from 
Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, Pennsyl- 
vania, New Jersey and Maine, District of Columbia should apply 
through the Board of Higher Education in their home state since 
these states allow funds to be used at in-state or out-of-state 
schools. 

Applications for the State of Massachusetts, Maine, New Jersey 
and Rhode Island may be picked up in the Financial Aid Office. 

Guaranteed Student Loan (HELP) 

This is a low interest loan made available to students through 
local banks. Students apply directly through a bank, preferably 
one they or their family have dealt with in the past. 

Effective January 1, 1980 the interest rate was raised from 7 to 
9 percent for new borrowers. Students who carry 7 percent loans 
have a 9 to 12 month grace period. Loans at the 9 percent rate 
carry a grace period of 6 months. 

Borrowing through this program became "need-based" as of 
October 1, 1981. Under the new regulations a student is eligible 
if the adjusted gross family income is $30,000 or less, or if over 
$30,000 and there is determined to be need. Therefore applicants 
must file a Financial Aid Form to be used in the need determi- 
nation. 

Undergraduate students may borrow up to $2,500 per academic 
year to a maximum of $12,500. Graduate and professional stu- 
dents may borrow up to $5,000 per year to an aggregate under- 
graduate and graduate total of $25,000. 

Parental Loans 

This new loan program originally called Parent Loans for Un- 
dergraduate Students (PLUS), may now be called Auxiliary Loans 
to Assist Students (ALAS). Parents may borrow up to $3,000 per 
year per dependent child to a maximum of $15,000. 

Effective October 1, 1981 independent and graduate or profes- 
sional students may borrow if they meet the bank's lending cri- 
teria. Undergraduate independent students may borrow the 
difference between $2,500 and their Guaranteed Student Loan. 
Graduate students may borrow up to $3,000 in addition to a Guar- 



anteed Student Loan. The maximum aggregate PLUS/ALAS loan 
is $15,000. 

Repayment begins within 60 days after disbursement at 14% 
interest. There is no in-school interest subsidy on these loans. 
NOTE: Students should be aware that their total resources (family 
and student contribution plus assistance awarded by the school) 
combined with the Guaranteed Student Loan and/or Parental 
Loan may not exceed their educational budget for any year. 

Outside Scholarships 

A limited amount of outside scholarships are available through 
town, state, and private agencies. Information in this area may 
be obtained directly from the source of the funds or from the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Other Financial Aid 

Various tuition aid or installment payment programs are avail- 
able, as well as commercial bank loans. Information is available 
for different payment plans, including the Boston College Tuition 
Prepayment Plan, at the Student Accounts Office in More Hall 
302 and the Financial Aid Office in Lyons 210. 



Student Services 

AHANA Student Programs 

(Afro-American, Hispanic, Asian and Native American) 

The goal of this office is to promote the optimal academic achieve- 
ment of AHANA students at Boston College, especially those 
identified as being at an educational disadvantage. Among the 
services offered by this office are: tutorial assistance; academic 
advisement; individual and group counseling; tracking of aca- 
demic performance; and career counseling. In addition to these 
services, the office assists various AHANA student organizations 
in developing and implementing programs designed to reflect the 
beauty, richness and diversity of differing cultures. 

Athletics 

The objective of the Boston College Athletic Association is to 
provide members of the entire university community with the 
opportunity to participate in, at the involvement level of one's 
choice, a program of physical activity which complements their 
spiritual, academic, cultural and social growth. 

To meet the needs of a diverse community, the Athletic As- 
sociation offers activities at five levels: unstructured recreation, 
instruction, organized intramural sports, club sports and inter- 
collegiate competition. 

Career Center 

The Career Center provides information, resources, and counsel- 
ing as part of its "education outside the classroom" service to 
students to assist them in making intelligent job and career/life 
planning choices. In addition to group meetings, career panels, 
and workshops, students and alumni can obtain job and career 
counseling with professional and paraprofessional staff. Other 
services include an internship program; a career resource library 
containing occupational, graduate school, career planning, and 
employer information; an on-campus recruiting program; alumni 
network; binders of current job opportunities; credentials; and 
career services for alumni. Students should begin their career 
planning in the freshman year, visit the Career Center at 38 Com- 
monwealth Avenue, and consult the Center's Monthly Calendar 
of Events for a complete listing of workshops, special programs, 
and other job/career activities. 

Chaplains 

The Chaplains Office strives to deepen the faith of Boston College 
students by offering opportunities to discover, grow in, express 
and celebrate the religious dimensions of their lives in personally 
relevant ways. In addition, it works to foster justice by developing 
social awareness and to build a sense of community as a Christian 
value in the whole University. Offices are located in McElroy 
Commons, Room 215. 



10 / Boston College 

STUDENT SERVICES 



Counseling and Mental Health Services 

A Counseling Office is located in each of the undergraduate col- 
leges to assist students in matters pertaining to personal adjust- 
ment, vocational decisions, educational planning and mental 
health problems. Provisions for individual counseling and psy- 
chotherapy are included among the services. Since the devel- 
opment of some types of personal potential and the solution of 
some adjustment difficulties can be achieved most effectively 
through group experiences, the Counseling Services provide a 
limited number of counseling groups each year. 

Psychiatric consultation and treatment are available, normally 
without cost to the student, through the College Mental Health 
Center of Boston, a non-profit psychiatric facility with which 
Boston College is affiliated. Students may request a referral from 
any of the campus Counseling Offices, the Health Services Clinic, 
or may contact the College Mental Health Center directly for an 
appointment at 262-3315. 

Dean of Students 

The Office of the Dean of Students offers rehabilitative counseling 
and interprets/implements University policies designed to safe- 
guard and enhance the rights/responsibilities of the individual 
and the University community. It is also responsible for the Mur- 
ray House Commuter Center, the Women's Resource Center, the 
Student Judicial System, the Student I.D. Program, the Lost and 
Found Department, Alcohol Concern Team and related education 
programs, and the Program for Handicapped Students. 

Dining Facilities 

The University offers service in three dining areas for resident 
students with a complete and nutritionally-balanced menu: 
McElroy Commons, Stuart Hall at Newton, and the New Dining 
Facility on St. Thomas More Road. In addition students may use 
their coupons in several a la carte cash-type facilities also avail- 
able to non-board students because of the increased flexibility of 
the Meal Plan. Additional coupons are available at one-half price, 
if required, to any student eating more than the average. The cost 
for the Base Plan is $800.00 per semester. In addition, the impact 
of Proposition 2Vz may force Governor King to reinstitute a Meal's 
Tax in Massachusetts for students, which will have an effect on 
the dollars the students are paying for their Plan. 

The Meal Plan is mandatory for Resident Students living in 
Upper Campus, Newton, and the New Dormitory on St. Thomas 
More Road. The Board Plan Office, Ext. 3525 and 3533 will pro- 
vide information on request which may be very helpful to those 
who do not understand the Meal Plan. 

Health Services 

The primary purpose of the Health Service is to meet the im- 
mediate health needs of the students and to assist them in main- 
taining an optimal level of health through educative services. The 
Department has two units: a clinic located in Cushing Hall on the 
Chestnut Hill Campus, and a 21-bed infirmary located in Keyes 
House South on the Newton Campus. Emergency service is also 
provided. 

Payment of the Health/Infirmary Fee is required for all under- 
graduate students living in university housing. Undergraduates 
residing off-campus, but away from their family homes, are also 
charged the Health/Infirmary Fee but may request a waiver in 
September from the Health Services Office if they do not wish 
to utilize the services during the year. 

The Health/Infirmary Fee is optional for commuting students 
living at their family home, and for graduate students. Any com- 
muting student who has been erroneously billed may request that 
a credit be processed at the Health Services Office. 

The Health/Infirmary Fee is not a substitute for a health insur- 
ance policy and the University strongly recommends that all stu- 
dents be covered additionally by an appropriate health insurance 
policy for hospital care and diagnostic testing. 

An informational brochure detailing the school health services 
at Boston College is available at the Health Services Office, Cush- 
ing Hall, Room 119. Insurance information can also be obtained 
there. 



Residence Accommodations 

Boston College offers several different types of undergraduate 
student housing in three different residence areas. Each area 
houses both male and female students. The building style and 
individual accommodations vary with the location and are de- 
scribed below: 

1. Lower Campus 

a. Edmond's Hall Apartment Complex 

The nine-story Edmond's Hall Apartment Complex, com- 
pleted in the fall of 1975, houses approximately 800 male 
and female students in 200 two-bedroom apartments. Each 
apartment unit consists of two bedrooms, bath, dining area, 
kitchen and living room. These modern, completely fur- 
nished, air-conditioned apartment units house primarily 
upperclassmen. Subscription to the University Meal Plan 
is optional. 

b. Hillside-Rubenstein Apartment Complex 

This air-conditioned apartment complex, completed in the 
spring of 1973, houses 725 students. Each completely fur- 
nished apartment unit includes two or three bedrooms, 
two baths, living room, dining area and kitchen. This area 
houses males and females, four or six per apartment, but 
is generally restricted to juniors and seniors. Subscription 
to the University Meal Plan is optional. 

c. Modular Apartment Complex 

The Modular Complex or village consists of 86 duplex 
townhouse apartments. Completed in the spring of 1971, 
each air-conditioned, and fully furnished apartment unit 
has three bedrooms, two and Vz baths, living room, and 
kitchen. This area houses both male and female students, 
six per apartment, but is generally restricted to juniors and 
seniors. Subscription to the University Meal Plan is op- 
tional. 

d. St. Thomas More Drive Residence Hall 

This suite-style residence hall completed in the fall of 
1980, consists of four and eight person suites housing ap- 
proximately 800 male and female students. Each eight per- 
son suite has a furnished lounge area and includes a sink 
and counter space. Each floor of the residence hall has a 
separate lounge and study area. The facility also includes 
a 650 seat dining hall, a television lounge, a laundry room, 
typing rooms, and a game and recreation area. These units 
house primarily underclassmen. Subscription to the Uni- 
versity Meal Plan is mandatory. 

2. Upper Campus Residence Halls 

These are standard dormitory structures with double student 
rooms along a corridor. Each room is furnished with a bed, 
desk, dresser, chair, desk lamp, wastebasket and either shades 
or drapes. These twelve buildings house approximately 150 
students each, normally freshmen and sophomores. All Upper 
Campus residents are required to subscribe to the University 
Meal Plan. 

3. Newton Campus Residence Halls 

The six dormitory buildings on the Newton Campus are similar 
to the "Upper Campus Dormitories" and are furnished in the 
same manner. Daily free bus service is provided to the Chest- 
nut Hill campus, which is located one and one-half miles from 
the Newton Campus. The Newton Campus offers a unique 
environment and special academic and social programs which 
make it attractive to many freshman students. The University 
Meal Plan is mandatory for Newton Campus residents and a 
cafeteria is located on the campus. 

4. Special Interest Housing 

The University also offers two special interest houses for stu- 
dents. Shaw House on the upper Campus houses 21 under- 
graduates in the Honors Program. Special educational programs 
are sponsored by the House during the year. Greycliff Hall at 
2051 Commonwealth Avenue houses 37 undergraduate stu- 
dents interested in the Romance Languages of French and 
Spanish. A full-time faculty member lives in the facility with 
the students and moderates the three credit conversation 
course offered to the residents. 

5. Off Campus Housing 

The University provides no residence facilities for graduate 
students. It does, however, operate a Non-Resident Housing 
Information Office in Rubenstein Hall for the convenience of 



Boston College / 11 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



those seeking referrals for off-campus housing. The office 
maintains updated listings of apartments and rooms available 
for rental in areas surrounding the campus. Interested students 
should visit the office Monday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 
4:00 p.m. No listings are available by mail. 
In addition to the stated facilities, the University may lease ad- 
ditional facilities on a temporary basis if faced with a housing 
shortage in accommodating new students. 

Student Programs and Resources 

The place of student activities in the experience of a college 
student has great potential for contributing to his/her overall de- 
velopment. Among the services offered by the Office of Student 
Programs and Resources are the coordination of student organi- 
zations, the publication of the Student Guide and the management 
of the Ticket Booth, Orientation Program and O'Connell Student 
Union. 

The Office of Student Programs and Resources also serves as 
a focal point for international students attending Boston College. 

Academic Regulations 

Note: In addition to being familiar with the "Academic Regula- 
tions" in this "University" section of the bulletin, students are 
expected to know the "Academic Regulations" of their own col- 
lege printed on subsequent pages. 

University Degree Requirements 

The requirement for the Bachelor's Degree in the undergraduate 
day colleges is the completion with satisfactory cumulative av- 
erage (at least 1.5, with the exception of the College of Arts and 
Sciences, which requires a minimum average of 1.667) of at least 
38 three-credit courses, or their equivalent, distributed over eight 
semesters of full-time academic work. Acceleration of degree pro- 
grams is possible in exceptional circumstances, provided Dean's 
approval is obtained at least two full semesters before early grad- 
uation and University policies governing acceleration are fol- 
lowed. 

University Core Requirements 

The minimum liberal education CORE requirement to be fulfilled 
by all undergraduate students, as administered by the Council on 
Liberal Education, over a four-year period, will be the following. 
For specific CORE requirements of the various schools and de- 
partments, students should consult the appropriate sections of 
this Bulletin: 

2 in English 

2 in History 

2 in either Natural Science or Mathematics 

2 in Philosophy 

2 in Social Sciences (Sociology, Political Science, Economics, 
Psychology and approved courses in the professional schools) 

2 in Theology 

2 in any one of the following cluster areas: 

a) Foreign Languages or Culture 

b) Fine Arts, Music, Speech Communication and Theatre 



Grading Scale 

The grading system consists of twelve categories, as follows: A, 
A-, B + , B, B-, C+, C. C-, D+, D, D-, F. A is excellent; B is 
good; C is satisfactory; D is passing but unsatisfactory; F is failure. 

While the grade I (incomplete) is not recorded for undergrad- 
uates, Boston College recognizes that under unusual circumstan- 
ces (e.g., extended illness), a limited extension of time beyond 
the end of the semester in which a course was initiated may be 
warranted. This can be accomplished with permission of the pro- 
fessor involved after consultation with the Associate Dean of his 
or her undergraduate college. The professor will establish the 
criteria and time limits for completion of the work. Normally, 
extensions will not extend beyond the sixth week of the semester 
following that in which the course was initiated. 

In computing averages the following numerical equivalents for 
the twelve (12) letter grades are used: 



A 


4.00 


B- 


2.67 


D + 


1.33 


A- 


3.67 


C + 


2.33 


D 


1.00 


B + 


3.33 


c 


2.00 


D- 


.67 


B 


3.00 


c- 


1.67 


F 


.00 



A student's cumulative average is comprised of courses taken 
at Boston College, and does not include courses accepted in trans- 
fer. Information about a course failed remains on the student's 
record and 0.0 is still computed into averages even if the course 
is repeated with a passing grade; the later grade is also computed 
into averages. 

Grades will be mailed by the University Registrar's Office to 
each student shortly after the close of each semester. 

Academic Integrity 

Students at Boston College are expected to have high standards 
of integrity. Any student who cheats or plagiarizes on examina- 
tions or assignments is subject to dismissal from the College. 
Cases involving academic integrity shall be referred to a Dean for 
adjudication or for judgment by an Administrative Board, as the 
student shall request. 

Academic Grievances 

Any student who believes he or she has been treated unfairly in 
academic matters should consult with the Chairperson of the 
Undergraduate Program or the Dean to discuss the situation and/ 
or to obtain information about relevant grievance procedures. 

The Dean's List 

The Dean's List recognizes the achievement of students semester 
by semester. The List classifies students in three groups according 
to semester averages: First Honors (3.700 - 4.000); Second Honors 
(3.500 - 3.699); Third Honors (3.300 - 3.499). 

Degree with Honors 

Latin honors accompanying the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science are awarded in three grades according to the 
cumulative average attained by full-time attendance: Summa cum 
Laude, with Highest Honors, is awarded to students with a cu- 
mulative average of 3.667 or above; Magna cum Laude, with High 
Honors, to those with averages between 3.333 and 3.666; and 
Cum Laude, with Honors, to those with averages between 2.900 
and 3.332. 

Beginning with the Class of 1983 Honors will be awarded on 
a percentage basis. The degree will be awarded Summa cum 
Laude to the top 4.5% of the graduating class, Magna cum Laude 
to the next 9.5% and Cum Laude to the next 15% 

Absence from a Semester Examination 

Students will have to arrange for making up a semester exami- 
nation which they have missed with the professor. Professors are 
asked to announce the time and manner by which students must 
notify them of absence and make arrangements for taking the 
absentee examinations. If, in particular courses, announcements 
about absentee examinations are not made, students should ask 
the professors to specify the acceptable excuse(s) for absence and 
the manner and time of notification and of arrangements for the 
make-up examination. 

The only exception to the foregoing is the case where the stu- 
dent, because of an extended illness or serious injury, will miss 
all or most of his or her examinations and be unable to make up 
examinations for a week or more beyond the period scheduled 
for semester examinations. In such cases, the student or his or 
her family should call the Office of the Associate Dean of his or 
her college as soon as the prospect of extended absence becomes 
clear. 

Transfers Within Boston College 

Matriculated students wishing to transfer from one undergraduate 
college to another within Boston College should contact the 
Dean's Office of the school to which admission is sought. Fresh- 



12 / Boston College 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



men should wait until late March to initiate this process; other 
classes usually make inquiries in late October or in late March. 
The college administration involved in these procedures are: 

College of Arts and Sciences Dean Green Gasson 109 

Dean McHugh Gasson 109 

Dean McMahon Gasson 109 

School of Education Dean Smith Campion 104A 

School of Management Dean Cronin Fulton 314 

School of Nursing Dean Dineen Cushing 203 

Withdrawal From a Course 

Students who withdraw from a course after the first five class 
days of the semester but before the last three weeks of class will 
have a "W" recorded in the grade column of their permanent 
record. Students will not be permitted to drop courses during the 
last three weeks of classes or during the exam period. Students 
who are still registered at this point will receive a final grade for 
the semester. 

Withdrawal From Boston College 

Students who wish to withdraw from Boston College in good 
standing are required to complete a Withdrawal Form and sched- 
ule an exit interview in the University Registrar's Office. In the 
case of students who are dismissed for academic or disciplinary 
reasons, the appropriate college administrator will complete this 
form. 

Leave of Absence or Special Study Program 

Degree candidates seeking a leave of absence from Boston College 
are required to complete a Leave of Absence Form available in 
the University Registrar's Office. Students who take a leave of 
absence, subsequently decide to enroll at another college and 
then wish to re-enter Boston College, must apply through Transfer 
Admissions. 

To assure reenrollment for a particular semester following a 
leave of absence or participation in a special study program, stu- 
dents must notify the University Registrar's Office and the Dean's 
Office of the college or school about their intention, at least six 
weeks in advance of the start of that semester. 

Readmission 

Students who desire readmission will initiate the process in the 
University Registrar's Office, Lyons Hall. Applications for read- 
mission should be made there and at the Dean's Office of the 
school involved at least six weeks before the start of the semester 
in which the former student seeks to resume study. The appro- 
priate Dean's Office will make the decision on the application 
and notify the former student about the action taken. The decision 
will be based on consideration of the best interests of both the 
student and the University. 



Special Programs (Non-degree) 

Cross Registration Program 

Under a program of cross-registration, Sophomores, Juniors and 
Seniors may take in each semester one elective course at either 
Boston University, Brandeis University, Hebrew College, Pine 
Manor College, Regis College or Tufts University if a similar 
course is not available at Boston College. A description of cross- 
registration procedures and the authorization form to participate 
in it are available in the University Registrar's Office, Lyons 101. 

Junior Year Abroad 

The Boston College Junior Year Abroad Program has as its ideal 
the complete integration of the American student within a foreign 
educational structure. Provided he or she has the necessary lan- 
guage preparation, the student is free to choose the country and 
university where he or she wishes to study. Where there is an 
established and supervised program in the university of the stu- 
dent's choice, it is suggested that he or she take advantage of this 
opportunity. If there is no such program, then the student enters 



directly into the university setting and competes on the same 
basis as others enrolled in the foreign university. 

Permission to spend the Junior year abroad is open to Sopho- 
mores, both men and women, in good standing in any of the 
undergraduate schools of Boston College. Application should be 
made as early as possible in the sophomore year, because some 
foreign universities require a very early registration. To be eli- 
gible, a student must have at least a B (2.9) grade in the major 
field, approximately the same grade in general average, and the 
approval of the Dean of the college. All applications are processed 
through the Office of the Junior Year Abroad Program. The stu- 
dent must consult the chairperson of the department of his or her 
major field for a program of studies to meet the requirements of 
his or her field of concentration and the collegiate degree. The 
student is encouraged to prepare for examinations in all subjects 
studied while abroad. These results are received by Boston Col- 
lege and translated into American academic equivalents. The stu- 
dent may be asked to submit written evidence of work done 
abroad and to take an oral examination for certification of credit. 

Irish Studies at University College Cork 

Irish Studies offers a junior year Irish Studies Program at Uni- 
versity College, Cork which provides intensive exposure in areas 
of Irish culture not normally available in the United States, such 
as Irish ethnography, folklore, and anthropology. Interested stu- 
dents should apply to the Junior Year Abroad Office or see Pro- 
fessors Dalsimer and O'Neill of the English and History Depart- 
ments. 

The PULSE Program 

PULSE affords the Boston College undergraduate an opportunity 
to combine community-based field work with the study of Phi- 
losophy or Theology. PULSE operates with the assumption that 
the community work provides an exciting point of departure for 
serious philosophical and theological reflection. 

Through the combination of reflective, academic work and field 
experience, the program encourages the student to form critical 
perspectives on society, community and self. A student's expe- 
rience — whether in working with children, visiting the elderly, 
lobbying at the State House or working with juvenile delin- 
quents — becomes the context in which questions of personal au- 
thenticity, communal bias and the forces promoting or inhibiting 
social change are probed. 

Opportunities for field experience are available in a variety of 
different neighborhoods and institutions. Included in the range 
of placements are crisis-counseling services, community action 
groups, schools, adolescent homes and after-school recreation 
programs. The placements aim at responding to community needs 
while simultaneously providing a challenging opportunity for 
students to confront social problems. (PULSE also offers a limited 
number of students the chance to develop independent projects.) 

Supervision of student work includes on-site meetings with 
indigenous staff supplemented by bi-monthly meetings on cam- 
pus. PULSE thus provides three levels of direction and super- 
vision for student work. (1) The PULSE Director has overall 
responsibility for the educational goals and interests of PULSE 
students. In fulfilling that responsibility, the Director works as 
a consultant and advisor for both students and supervisors. (2) 
Each field project has a PULSE Council Coordinator, a student 
who is a member of the PULSE Council. (3) Each field project has 
an on-site Supervisor who, after an initial orientation session, 
meets regularly with students to provide information, direction 
and criticism. 

Besides course work and supervision, PULSE sponsors films, 
slide shows, housing tours and workshops which are all designed 
to further enhance a student's experience. Some recent workshop 
topics have been Death and Dying and working with children. 

Students may participate in PULSE during any of their under- 
graduate years at Boston College. They may participate in the 
same project over several semesters or move on to projects treating 
different problems. Although classroom reflection is regarded as 
the key to the fullest possible experience, students are allowed 
to work in projects without participation in a course. Credit, how- 
ever, can only be made available to those students registered in 
PULSE courses. 



Boston College / 13 

COURSE OFFERINGS 



For details on PULSE courses, consult the listings of the Phi- 
losophy and Theology departments. 



Course Numbers and Codes 

The alphabetic prefix indicates the department or program offering 
the course. The number indicates the level of the course. 

000-299-Courses for undergraduate registration 

300-699-Courses for undergraduate and graduate registration. For 
Education courses, this range is 300-399 

700-999-Courses for graduate registration 

(F; 3) or (S; 3) A 3-credit course that will be offered either in the 
Fall or in the Spring. 

(F, S; 3) One course which will be offered in the Fall and in 

the Spring, but may be taken only once for 3 credits. 

(F, S; 3, 3) A two-semester course that can be taken both se- 

mesters for a total of 6 credits. 



College of 
Arts & Sciences 






Arts and Sciences / 15 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



College Of ArtS and ScienCeS Requirements for the Degree 



The College of Arts and Sciences confers the academic degree of 
either Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) or Bachelor of Science (B.S.), de- 
pending upon the candidate's major field. All degree programs 
within the college follow the liberal arts tradition. 

Each student selects a major, which is a systematic concentra- 
tion of courses that develops an understanding in depth of a 
single academic discipline or of an interdisciplinary topic. A 
student may choose more than one major, but in each must fulfill 
the minimum requirements set by the department and the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

The fields in which majors are available are: Art History, Bi- 
ology, Chemistry, Classical Civilization, Classics, Computer Sci- 
ence, Economics, English, Geology, Geophysics, Germanic Studies, 
Greek, History, Latin, Linguistics, Mathematics, Philosophy, 
Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Romance Languages and 
Literatures, Russian, Slavic Studies, Sociology, Speech Com- 
munication and Theatre, Studio Art, and Theology. An Inde- 
pendent Major, involving courses from several departments, is 
also available under certain conditions for students whose needs 
cannot be satisfied by the offerings of a single department. 

Each student also takes courses from the core curriculum, usu- 
ally during the freshman and sophomore years. These courses are 
intended to provide the cultural background, intellectual training, 
and structure of basic principles by which students can compre- 
hend a complex world and cope with rapid changes as they occur. 

Because of the great diversity of course offerings in the College 
of Arts and Sciences, it is important that each student exercise 
care, both in the selection of a major as well as in the selection 
of courses in the major, courses in the core curriculum, and other 
elective courses. It is also advisable that students, particularly 
those with even a tentative interest in major fields (e.g. languages, 
sciences, mathematics or art) which are structured and involve 
sequences of courses, begin selection of their major and related 
courses at an early date. Students considering a career in medicine 
or dentistry should begin in the freshman year to fulfill the re- 
quirements for admission to professional schools in these areas. 

It should not be considered necessary, or even desirable, that 
a degree from the College of Arts and Sciences, by itself, provide 
all the training needed to perform a specific job. It should provide 
preparation for graduate study in the major field or a related field, 
however. It should also furnish sufficient breadth of information 
and exposure to methods of inquiry so that, either alone or with 
additional training provided by professional schools, the student 
might effectively prepare for any one of a wide variety of careers, 
perhaps for a career not foreseen while the student is in college. 

Academic and Career Planning 

Simply stated, planning a course of study is difficult but neces- 
sary. In a college as diverse as Arts and Sciences, the choices of 
courses and areas of concentration are so numerous that a student 
should avoid a simple or haphazard arrangment of program. To 
ensure a coherent, well-developed program students are urged to 
consult at least once a semester with a faculty advisor within 
their major department. Students should also broadly consult 
with other faculty, students, the Deans, the Pre-Medical and Pre- 
Law advisors, the Offices of Counseling and of Career Planning 
and potential employers and professionals outside the University 
to ensure that all academic options have been considered and 
that plans are properly laid for meeting post-graduate objectives. 



Academic Regulations 

These Academic Regulations are effective from September of the 
academic year printed on the cover and binding of this Bulletin, 
except where a different date is explicitly set in a particular Reg- 
ulation. If, after a student has withdrawn from Boston College, 
there have been changes in the Academic Regulations, and if the 
student is subsequently readmitted to the College, the Regulations 
in effect at the time of return apply. 

Each student is expected to know the Academic Regulations 
presented below. 



1.1 The requirement for the Bachelor's Degree is the completion, 
with satisfactory cumulative average (at least 1.667 starting with 
the Class of 1985), of at least 38 one-semester courses (each car- 
rying a minimum of three semester-hour credits), normally dis- 
tributed over eight semesters of four academic years. 

1.2 Within the 38 courses, the following 14, comprising the core 
curriculum, are required for all students: 

2 courses in English 

2 courses in History (European History) 

2 courses in Philosophy 

2 courses in Theology 

2 courses in Natural Science or Mathematics 

2 courses in Social Sciences (Economics, Political 

Science, Psychology, or Sociology) 
2 courses in any one of the following cluster areas: 

a) Foreign Languages or Culture 

b) Fine Arts, Music or Speech Communication 

c) Natural Science or Mathematics 

Identification of the courses which will satisfy the core in each 
department can be determined by contacting the department and 
by reference to each semester's Schedule of Courses. 

1.3 Each major within the College of Arts and Sciences requires 
at least 10 courses. No more than 12 courses for the major may 
be required from any one department. Two of these may be taken 
at the introductory level, at the discretion of the department. For 
the remainder of the courses, each department may designate 
specific courses or distribution requirements either within or out- 
side the department to assure the desired coherence and structure 
of the major program. 

1.4 Courses outside the core and major field should be selected 
with an eye toward integration and balance. It is possible for a 
student to major in two fields but for each major, all requirements 
must be satisfied, and no course may count toward more than 
one major. 

1.5 Program Distribution: Of the 38 one-semester, three-credit 
courses required for graduation, Arts and Sciences students must 
complete at least 32 courses in departments of the College of Arts 
and Sciences. The remaining courses may be chosen from the 
offerings of the Boston College professional schools. Courses 
taken outside of Boston College under approved special study 
programs may also fulfill this requirement; when admitted to 
Boston College, transfer students may have accepted towards an 
Arts and Sciences degree courses analogous to Arts and Sciences 
offerings. 

Normal Program, Overloads, Acceleration 

2.1 Freshmen, sophomores, and juniors are normally required to 
carry five courses per semester; seniors, four courses per semester. 
Students who fail to complete the normal semester course load 
by failure, or withdrawal from a course, or by underloading, incur 
a course deficiency(cies). Non-seniors who wish to take only four 
courses in a semester may do so, but should consult with one of 
the Deans; students who underload should plan to remove the 
course deficiency so incurred as soon as possible (see 6.1 and 
6.2). Full-time status for a student in any class requires enrollment 
in at least four courses in each semester. 

2.2 Tuition shall apply per semester as published even if a min- 
imum full-time load or less is carried. 

2.3 All students wishing to enroll in a sixth course during a 
semester must receive a Dean's approval before confirmation of 
registration. Approval will be given to the request of students 
who have earned in a full course load at least a 3.0 overall average 
or a 3.0 average in the semester immediately prior to the one for 
which the overload is sought. Students whose averages so defined 
are between 2.0 and 3.0 may, under exceptional circumstances, 
be allowed by a Dean to enroll in a sixth course. Overload courses 
must be taken initially as audits and at the student's request are 
changed to credit at the time specified in the Schedule of Courses 
and posted outside the Deans' Office. Students are not permitted 
to take a sixth course in their first semester at Boston College. 

All students taking a sixth 3-credit course for acceleration or 
for making up a deficiency will be charged at the prevailing credit- 
hour rate. 



16 / Arts and Sciences 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



2.4 The only courses which a student, after admission to Boston 
College, may apply toward an Arts and Sciences degree (whether 
for core, major, or total course requirements) will be those taken 
at Boston College in a regular course of study during the academic 
year. The Deans of the College of Arts and Sciences are authorized 
to grant exceptions to the provisions of this regulation for the 
following situations: 

— official cross-registration programs; 

— the Junior Year Abroad Program; 

— official college exchange programs; 

— special study programs at an academic institution other than 
Boston College; 

— removal of deficiencies incurred by failure, withdrawal 
from a course, or course underload; 

— subject to certain restrictions, courses in the Evening Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences and Business Administration. 

For any of the above exceptions, students must obtain in advance 
written approval from a Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

2.5 After being in residence for at least three semesters, and at 
least two full semesters prior to the proposed date of graduation, 
students may apply to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 
(Gasson 103) to accelerate their degree program by one or two 
semesters. Students must present a minimum cumulative average 
of 3.2; they will be considered for approval only for exceptional 
reasons. In accordance with University policies governing accel- 
erated programs of study, the following will also be applicable: 

1) Summer courses intended for acceleration must be taken at 
Boston College and must be authorized in advance by a 
Dean. 

2) Overload courses taken for acceleration will carry an extra 
tuition charge. 

3) Students transferring into Boston College with first semester 
sophomore status or above are not eligible to accelerate their 
program of study. 



Pass/Fail Electives 

3.1 Non-Freshmen are eligible, with approval of the department 
concerned, to enroll in a course on a Pass/Fail basis. This must 
be done at registration time in the Office of the Deans. 

3.2 No more than 6 courses carrying "Pass" will be accepted 
towards the A&S degree. 

3.3 Courses completed with a "Pass" evaluation do not fulfill the 
requirements of either the core curriculum or major field. 

Fulfillment of Requirements by 
Equivalencies 

4.1 In the following circumstances, departments may rule that 
specific degree requirements may be met by equivalencies for 
certain courses: 

a) At any time before the senior year, a student may be ex- 
empted from taking courses in a core area. Such exemp- 
tions will be based on equivalency examinations in which 
the student demonstrates, to the satisfaction of the chair- 
person of the department concerned, a mastery of the con- 
tent of such course(s). Exemptions do not carry grade or 
credit. 

b) Certain departments offer and identify full-year courses 
whose second semester content builds upon the material 
covered in first semester. For this reason, a student who 
fails the first semester of such a course should seriously 
consider whether it is advisable to continue in the second 
semester. However, a student may, with the approval of 
a Dean, be allowed to continue in the course. A second 
semester grade of C + or better will entitle the student to 
credit and a grade of D- for the first semester of the 
course. This regulation may be applied also to Pass/Fail 
electives in a two-semester offering provided both se- 
mesters are taken Pass/Fail. The grade of Pass, rather than 
D- , will be awarded for the first semester in such cases. 
A list of departments and courses where this regulation 
applies is on file in the Dean's Office. 

Academic Standards 

5.1 It is expected that a student will have passed 10 courses by 



the beginning of the second year, 20 courses by the beginning of 
the third year and 30 courses by the beginning of the fourth year. 

5.2 Students who transfer to Boston College with fewer courses 
credited than required for the status assigned by the Admissions 
Office must make up these deficiencies in order to graduate as 
scheduled. 

5.3 Beginning with the Class of 1985, in order to remain in the 
College a student must maintain a cumultative average of at least 
1.50 during the first two years, as the minimum standard of schol- 
arship, but must have a minimum cumulative average of 1.667 
in order to begin the senior year. In addition, a student must have 
passed, while at Boston College, at least 8 courses by the end of 
the first year, 18 courses at the end of the second year, 28 courses 
at the end of the third year. Otherwise, the Associate Deans will 
require the student to withdraw. If a student passes only 2 courses 
in a semester, the Associate Deans will require immediate with- 
drawal. 

5.4 Beginning with the Class of 1985, a student whose cumulative 
average falls below 2.000 or who incurs two deficiencies is au- 
tomatically on academic warning and will be so informed by a 
letter from the Office of the Associate Deans. A student whose 
cumulative average falls below 1.667 loses academic good stand- 
ing. A student who incurs three or more deficiencies loses aca- 
demic good standing and will be required to withdraw from the 
College. The Office of the Associate Deans shall issue a letter to 
any student not in academic good standing requiring such a stu- 
dent to obtain appropriate academic advisement, as specified in 
the letter. 

5.5 A student who has been required to withdraw because of 
three or more deficiencies may immediately apply to the Deans 
for reinstatement or readmission. To be eligible for return a stu- 
dent must, ordinarily, reduce outstanding deficiencies to one by 
passing, with grades of at least C — , course(s) which have been 
approved in advance by a Dean (see 6.1 below). A student who 
has not received prior approval from a Dean, or who fails to 
achieve a grade of C - in each of the requisite number of decision, 
after review of such matters, when unanimous, is approved 
courses, will not be allowed to matriculate in the College of Arts 
and Sciences for at least a semester. 

5.6 Only a student who is in academic good standing shall be 
graduated from the College. 

5.7 Appeals on matters of fact involved in required withdrawal, 
reinstatement or readmission are to be made to the Associate 
Deans; their decision, after review of such matters, when unan- 
imous, is final. Appeals on matters of fact where the decision of 
the Associate Deans on review is by split vote and appeals on 
questions of interpretation of the Regulations involved in re- 
quired withdrawal, reinstatement or readmission can be carried 
only to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

( 

Make-Up of Course Deficiencies 

6.1 A student who, by failure, withdrawal or underload, lacks the 
number of courses required for his/her status must make up the 
deficiency(cies). This must be done by passing additional course(s) 
at Boston College in the regular academic year, or with a grade 
of at least C- , courses in the Boston College Summer Session or 
Evening College or, with at least C - , courses at another accredited 
four-year college. EVERY MAKE-UP COURSE MUST BE AUTHOR- 
IZED IN WRITING BY A DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES PRIOR TO REGISTRATION IN IT. A deficiency should 
be made up as soon as possible after it has been incurred. 

6.2 To make up deficiencies no more than three approved three- 
credit courses or their equivalent will be accepted from any one 
summer session; and no more than a total of four approved three- 
credit courses or their equivalent will be accepted from two or 
more sessions in the same summer. 

Class Attendance 

7.1 In order that students may derive the fullest benefit from the 
college experience, they are expected to attend class regularly. 
After an absence a student is responsible for finding out what 
happened in class, especially for getting information about an- 
nounced tests, papers, or other assignments. Professors may in- 
clude, as part of the semester grade, marks for the quality and 
quantity of the student's participation in class, provided an- 



Arts and Sciences / 17 

SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



nouncement of this factor is made at the beginning of the se- 
mester. 

7.2 A student who is absent from class on the day of a previously 
announced test or assignment is not entitled, as a matter of right, 
to make up what was missed. 

7.3 In cases of absence extending beyond a week the student or 
a family member is expected to communicate with a Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. Academic arrangements for the 
student's return to courses should be made with a Dean of the 
College as soon as the student's health or other circumstances 
permit. 

Leave of Absence 

8.1 A student in good standing who desires to interrupt the nor- 
mal progress of an academic program and to resume studies at 
Boston College within a year may petition for a leave of absence. 
The process begins in the Office of the University Registrar (Lyons 
101). A leave of absence will not normally be granted to students 
who expect to do full-time academic work at other institutions, 
and will usually last for no more than one year, although petition 
for extension is possible. 

Academic Integrity 

9.1 Students at Boston College are expected to have high stan- 
dards of integrity. Any student who cheats on examinations or 
plagiarizes on assignments is subject to dismissal from the Col- 
lege. Cases involving academic integrity shall be referred to a 
Dean for adjudication or for judgement by an Administrative 
Board, as the student shall request. 

Administrative Board 

10.1 An Administrative Board shall act, when called upon, in 
matters relating to "Academic Integrity." 

10.2 An Administrative Board shall be composed of three people 
from the College, i.e., a Dean, a full-time faculty member, and a 
student. The faculty member shall be selected by the Dean from 
a list of six faculty members designated annually for this purpose 
by the Educational Policy Committee. The student member shall 
be selected by the Dean from a list of six A&S students designated 
annually for this purpose by the student members of the Edu- 
cational Policy Committee. 

10.3 A student coming before an Administrative Board shall have 
the right to exercise two challenges without cause against the 
student and/or faculty appointees to the Board. 

Procedure of Appeal 

11.1 Students with questions of interpretation or petitions for 
exception from these Regulations, apart from those specified in 
5.5 above, may submit them to an Appeals Board appointed by 
the Educational Policy Committee. 

11.2 A student should resolve problems on the manner in which 
grades have been awarded or on the academic practices of an 
instructor by direct and immediate contact with the instructor. 
In the rare case of an unresolved question the student should first 
refer the matter in an informal manner to the chairperson or 
director of the appropriate department or program. 

11.3 A formal appeal of a course grade, which ought not be entered 
lightly by a student nor lightly dismissed by an instructor, may 
be made normally no later than the sixth week of the following 
semester. In making a formal appeal a student files a written 
statement with the department chairperson or program director 
and thereafter the appeal is handled in accordance with guide- 
lines approved by the Educational Policy Committee of the Col- 
lege. Current guidelines are available at the Office of the Dean. 

Internal Transfers into Arts and Sciences 

12.1 The College of Arts and Sciences expects that students 
transferring into it from other schools of Boston College will have 
a record free of academic deficiencies and a cumulative average 
of at least 2.5 and will complete at least three semesters of full- 
time study in Arts and Sciences after the transfer; previous en- 
rollment in A&S courses will not satisfy this requirement. 



Grade Change 

13.1 In exceptional circumstances, a grade change may be war- 
ranted. All such grade changes must be submitted for approval 
to the Dean's Office no later than 6 weeks after the beginning of 
the semester following that in which the course was initiated. 
This rule applies also to those grade changes that result from the 
completion of course work in cases where an extension was given 
to a student by a Dean to finish the work after the end of the 
semester in which the course was initiated. 

Degree with Honors 

Latin honors accompanying the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science are awarded in three grades: Summa Cum 
Laude, with Highest Honors, is awarded to the top 4.5% of the 
graduating class; Magna Cum Laude, with High Honors, is 
awarded to the next 9.5% and Cum Laude to the next 15%. These 
percentages are based on the student's 8-semester cumulative 
average. 



Special Academic Programs 

The Honors Program 

Scholastic excellence has traditionally been a hallmark of the 
educational experience at Boston College. In keeping with this 
tradition the Honors Program offers a flexible educational expe- 
rience which provides new and innovative courses to satisfy the 
educational needs and interests of students with unusual talent 
and a record of superior achievement. 

Students who seem to be sufficiently prepared and motivated 
to attempt a demanding program of study are interviewed and 
may be invited to participate in the Honors Program. 

Students admitted to the Honors Program have added oppor- 
tunity to devote their collegiate years to an education dedicated 
to excellence and enrichment through specialized curricula, 
modes of teaching and educational methods. Some examples: 
The Western Cultural Tradition This two-year course for Fresh- 
men and Sophomores is designed as a substitute for normally 
required core courses in English, Theology and Philosophy. 
Taught through methods ranging from lecture to seminar, the 
course attempts to discover and assess the ideas, issues, and val- 
ues of Western Civilization in their cultural context. 

Students in the Honors Program normally participate in a Junior 
Honors Seminar and a Senior Honors Thesis. 

Scholar of the College 

Candidacy in the Scholar of the College Program is extended to 
seniors with a 3.3 average who, after filing applications and dem- 
onstrating exceptional achievement, maturity, scholarly interest 
or creative skill, have been nominated by the Chairperson of their 
major department and been selected by the Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. The Program aims at recognizing, encour- 
aging and challenging superior scholarly and creative ability. In 
senior year the candidates carry one or two upper-division elec- 
tives while engaged in a Scholar's Project (an unusually scholarly 
or creative piece of work] under the direction of one or two faculty 
members. Upon satisfactory completion of the Scholar's Project 
the candidate is given the distinction of Scholar of the College 
at Commencement in May. Application for candidacy and an 
outline of the proposed project must be submitted to the chair- 
person by November 10 of the junior year if the student is a 
January graduate and April 1 of the junior year if the student is 
a May graduate. 

Departmental Honors 

The designation of departmental honors is reserved for above- 
average students who have demonstrated academic achievement 
in additional or more difficult courses, or by successfully un- 
dertaking an approved research project, as determined by each 
department. 

Independent Major 

While under normal circumstances students are advised to follow 



18 / Arts and Sciences 

SPECIAL INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS 



the formal educational programs offered by the departments, in 
rare instances, for those students with special interests or needs 
which cannot be satisfied in a regular major, or double major, the 
College provides an extra-departmental major called an "Inde- 
pendent Major". This major requires a student to plan, with the 
aid of a faculty advisor, an interdisciplinary program involving 
at least ten upper division courses, normally extending over no 
more than three departments, and selected in accordance with 
a clearly defined unifying principle. Such proposed majors 
should be submitted in writing to the Dean's office before the end 
of a student's sophomore year. The Dean will arrange a review 
of each proposal before the Committee on Independent Majors, 
and this committee will rule on the application and will insure 
that the major will be comparable in depth and coherence to a 
typical departmental concentration. 

Bachelor of Arts-Master of Social Work Program 

The College of Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School of 
Social Work offer a joint degree program for a limited number of 
undergraduate psychology and sociology majors. During the 
sophomore year interested students take two prerequisites (Sta- 
tistics and Introduction to Social Welfare) and apply for formal 
acceptance in the program. They must meet all standard require- 
ments for admission to the Graduate School of Social Work and 
complete all its foundation courses by the end of the senior year, 
at which time they receive the BA degree. They then enroll as 
Second Year MSW candidates for their fifth and final year. Fur- 
ther information and application materials may be obtained from 
the Graduate School of Social Work Admissions Office, McGuinn 
135. 

Bachelor's-Master's Program in Arts and Sciences 

This is a four-year program offered in conjunction with the Grad- 
uate School of Arts and Sciences for students who have at least 
a 3.3 average and who have demonstrated to exceptional degree 
maturity, ability to work independently and knowledge of their 
chosen field. Under this program a student will, upon satisfying 
the requirements of both undergraduate and graduate schools, be 
awarded Bachelor's and Master's degrees. Students interested in 
applying to this Program must present to the Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences by the end of the Sophomore year a formal 
proposal written in consultation with the department chairperson 
and a graduate faculty advisor in the intended major area. Ad- 
mission to the Program is recommended by the Dean to the Grad- 
uate School of Arts and Sciences after an appraisal of the 
applicant by a Dean's committee of advisors. Such recommen- 
dation will depend on overall excellence in the student's under- 
graduate record and exceptional performance in the undergraduate 
major. 

Further details regarding the proposal format and overall Pro- 
gram requirements may be obtained from A&S Department offices 
or the Office of the Dean. 

Minor in Secondary Education for Students 
in Arts and Sciences 

Students majoring in Art, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, English, 
History, Mathematics, French, Spanish, Speech Communication 
and Theatre or Theology in the College of Arts and Sciences may 
apply to minor in Education. This program begins in the junior 
year and interested students should contact the Coordinator of 
Secondary Education or the Associate Dean in the School of Ed- 
ucation during the first semester in the sophomore year. Only 
those students majoring in the disciplines listed above may apply 
for a minor in Education. 

N.B. Students majoring in English have additional requirements. 
Consult the Secondary Handbook and the advisor for these re- 
quirements. 

Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental Program 

This program, which is not an academic major, is headed by the 
Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental Advisor. Over the years the program has 
guided the undergraduate preparation of thousands of students 
and has assisted them in securing admission to scores of medical 
and dental schools, including the most prestigious. 



Medical and dental schools state clearly their preference for 
the applicant who, in college, has majored and excelled in a field 
of interest while demonstrating ability and achievement in at 
least four full-year science courses. Thus, the student planning 
to study medicine or dentistry may choose for a major field in 
college any one of the humanities or natural sciences or social 
sciences. Whatever the major, he or she is expected to acquire a 
liberal education and is required to have among his or her col- 
legiate courses one year of each of the following with laboratory: 
General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Biology and Physics. In 
addition, some medical and dental schools suggest or recommend 
one or several science electives; a large and growing number 
require a year of Calculus. Medical and dental schools expect 
good performance in all academic areas. Applicants with slightly 
lower grades in unusually challenging programs or in advanced 
courses are at least as acceptable as those with good or excellent 
grades in less demanding curricula or courses. 

Since normally application for medical and dental schools is 
made at the beginning of senior year and since, therefore, eval- 
uation and decision about admission are based on the student's 
record for three years, completion of the required sciences and 
mathematics by the end of junior year is strongly recommended. 

Because a large number of students are interested in careers in 
medicine and dentistry, competition for admission to medical 
and dental schools has become very intense. The mean grade 
point average for the 15,000 students admitted to medical school 
in Sept. 1978 is 3.48 (out of 4.0). For this reason, students in the 
pre-medical/pre-dental program are urged to examine critically 
and realistically their own performance by the middle of the 
sophomore year. Students who have any doubts about their ac- 
ademic record should consult the Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental Ad- 
visor as early as possible. Students are also urged to consider 
alternate careers while fulfilling the requirements for admission 
to medical or dental school. By careful choices of major and 
courses a student may prepare for careers in science, education, 
and management, as well as health services. Careers will be open 
in government, industry, teaching and social services for students 
who have a basic knowledge of mathematics, biology, chemistry 
and physics along with a knowledge of economics, management, 
sociology and psychology. 

Greycliff French and Spanish Language Houses 

Greycliff is a living/learning residence designed to encourage 
fluency in language speaking. 

Students living at Greycliff participate in informal programs in 
the languages. 

Residents are required to attend a weekly conversation hour 
for Greycliff students, under the supervision of a faculty member. 
After completion of two semesters of this living/learning program, 
Greycliff residents will receive 3 course credits. (See listing in 
Romance Languages course offerings). 



Special Interdisciplinary Programs 

In addition to the Areas of Major Study offered by individual 
departments, a variety of special programs is available. While no 
one of these is to be assumed a major, it is possible, in some of 
them, to develop a major program; and all of them are designed 
to provide a coherent grouping of courses drawn from various 
disciplines and focused around a specific theme. Through such 
programs, a student can integrate or enrich an academic program, 
even if it is not a major. 

American Studies 

American Studies is an interdisciplinary approach to the history, 
culture, and society of the United States. It represents a "holistic" 
approach to cultural study which transcends the boundaries of 
traditional disciplines. Cooperating departments include English, 
Economics, Fine Arts, History, Political Science and Sociology. 
The Program is housed in the Slade-Hovey Center (Hovey House). 
Qualified undergraduate students can develop a major in 
American Studies through the Independent Major Program. With 
the aid of a faculty advisor, students submit a proposal for an 
independent major in the second semester of their sophomore 
year; normally that program shall encompass eleven courses, in- 



Arts and Sciences / 19 

SPECIAL INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS 



eluding a four-course "core" preparation in appropriate depart- 
mental offerings, and a senior project. Students are also encouraged 
to undertake study in local Boston history and, where possible, 
participate in the graduate Master's Core colloquium in American 
Studies. 

Interested students should contact Professor Christopher Wil- 
son, English Department, Hovey House. 

Archaeological Expedition to Cyprus 

Fir five weeks in the early summer of 1983, a Boston College 
team, including twelve undergraduates, will excavate at "The 
Castle of the Forty Columns" in Paphos, Cyprus. This Byzantine 
castle was conquered in 1191 during the Third Crusade by English 
knights under Richard the Lion Heart. 

In the departments of History and Fine Arts, several courses 
are offered in 1982-83, courses which provide an interdiscipli- 
nary focus on the history, art and archaeology of the medieval 
Eastern Mediterranean, especially Cyprus. These courses are de- 
signed to appeal to students interested in the larger area focus, 
also to students desiring to participate in the archaeological ex- 
pedition (to be offered as a summer school course). 

Further information can be obtained from Professor John Ros- 
ser, Carney 228, x3808. 

Black Studies 

Black Studies at Boston College is an interdisciplinary program. 
Through courses in history, literature, sociology, political sci- 
ence, and the arts students can pursue a variety of approaches to 
understanding the black experience. A particular feature of the 
program is the introductory seminar, designed to introduce the 
student to interdisciplinary learning in the area of Black Studies. 
In addition to the courses listed below, related courses are offered 
in various departments in the university. Interested students 
should consult Mrs. Amanda Houston, Coordinator of the Black 
Studies Program, in Lyons 301, x3238. 

Bk 102 Seminar: Introduction to Black Studies (F; 1) 

Department 

Bk 104 Afro-American History I (F; 3) Department 

Bk 106/En 418 African-American Literature I (F; 3) Fahamisha 

Shariat Brown 

Bk 240/Sa 257 Black Theatre and Drama I (F; 3) Fahamisha 

Shariat Brown 

Bk 252/Sc 166 The Structure of the Black Family (F; 3) Dibinga 

Wa Said 

Bk 264 Business Ethics: Multinational Corporations in the Third 

World (F; 3) Dibinga Wa Said 

Bk 278 The American Labor Movement and the Black Worker 

(F; 3) Amanda Houston 

Bk 282 The Thought of W.E.B. DuBois (F; 3) Department 

Bk 286 History of Black Music (F; 3) Dan Woods 

Bk 105 Afro-American History II (S; 3) Department 

Bk 107 African-American Literature II (S; 3) Fahamisha Shariat 

Brown 

Bk 241/Sa 258 Black Theatre and Black Drama II (S; 3) 

Fahamisha Shariat Brown 

Bk 265 Business Ethics: Multinational Corporations in the Third 

World (S; 3) Dibinga Wa Said 

Bk 279 Perspectives on Black Women (S; 3) Amanda Houston 

Bk 283 Blacks in Boston (S; 3) Department 

Bk 287 The Process of Liberation in Africa (S; 3) Tsenay 

Serequeberhan 

The Cambridge Humanities Seminar 

The Cambridge Humanities Seminar is a collaborative effort by 
universities in the Boston-Cambridge area to enrich and diversify 
their interdisciplinary offerings in the humanities at an advanced 
level. The program is centered at M.I.T. and offers subjects to 
students in the humanities at participating universities during 
the last two years of undergraduate and the first two years of 
graduate work in an area of scholarship periodically determined 
by its membership. The program currently involves faculty in 
literature, history, philosophy, and fine arts. Its current subject 
is the idea of the past as it plays a role in the study of various 
cultural activities. All subjects have limited enrollment. For fur- 



ther information contact Prof. William Youngren, of the English 
Department, Carney 428, x3733. 

Center for East Europe, Russia and Asia (CEERA) 

The Center's programs encourage faculty and students to partic- 
ipate in interdepartmental endeavors on both the graduate and 
undergraduate levels. Participating faculty come from the De- 
partments of Economics, Education, Fine Arts, History, Philos- 
ophy, Political Science, Sociology, Slavic & Eastern Languages, 
and Theology, and offer over eighty academic courses connected 
with the study of the culture, history and political life of East 
Europe, Russia and Asia. Many of these same professors also take 
part in two biennial interdepartmental courses sponsored by 
CEERA. 

In addition to teaching activities, members of the Center are 
involved in publication of the specialized quarterly Studies in 
Soviet Thought and of the monograph series Sovietica, which 
now contains some forty-two volumes. Interested students with 
some knowledge of Russian or other relevant languages are en- 
couraged to participate in these projects. CEERA also sponsors 
talks and symposia on topics of interest. 

Undergraduate students may also earn a certificate of profi- 
ciency from the Center. Certificate requirements and other infor- 
mation on the operation of the Center are available from: 

Prof. Thomas J. Blakeley (Philosophy), Director, Carney 201A 
Prof. Peter S.H. Tang (Political Science), Associate Director 
McGuinn 229 
Information on undergraduate majors with related area concen- 
trations should be obtained directly from the academic depart- 
ments: AB, MA, PhD in History or Philosophy; AB, MA in Russian 
or in Slavic Studies (Slavic & Eastern Languages). 

Environmental Studies 

The Environmental Studies Program, under the direction of Pro- 
fessor George Goldsmith, assists students in the design of inter- 
disciplinary projects and programs dealing with environmental 
matters. Through it, students have access to environmental fa- 
cilities and resources at fourteen area institutions. 

Students in the Environmental Studies Program must major in 
a specific discipline. They may, however, develop a related con- 
centration in environmental studies by choosing relevant courses 
from the offerings of various departments on the BC campus and, 
in some instances, on the campuses of those institutions which 
have consortial arrangements with Boston College. Credit can also 
be obtained for independent study and internships with various 
environmental groups, both government and private. 

The Environmental Program sponsors, from time to time, spe- 
cial programs aimed at increasing environmental awareness. 
Those interested in pursuing s-tudies in this area should contact 
the Environmental Center, Prof. George Goldsmith, Higgins 453, 
X3592. 

The Immersion Program in French 

An interdisciplinary program administered by the Department of 
Romance Languages and Litereratures. 

Qualified students will take five core courses in French. They 
may select four courses in French from Economics, Fine Arts, 
History, Philosophy, Sociology or Theology. The Romance Lan- 
guages Department coordinating course Rl 341-342 will provide 
the student's fifth course. All potential candidates must be in- 
terviewed by selected faculty. Prerequisite: At least the equivalent 
of intermediate college French. For further information contact 
Katharine Hastings, Bourneuf House, x3262. Among the courses 
included in the Program are: 

Rl 341-342 Immersion Program Coordinating Course (F, S; 3) 

Department 

Th 081 French Religious Thinkers from Pascal to the Present 

(F, S; 3) Ernest Fortin, S.J. 

Pi 513 Contemporary French Philosophy I (F, S; 3) Richard 

Cobb-Stevens 

Hs 087-088 Europe from 1500 to the Present I (F, S; 3) Radu 

FJorescu 

Fa 223 Medieval Art in France (F, S; 3) Pamela Berger 



20 / Arts and Sciences 

AWARDS AND HONORS 



Ec 135-136 Principles of Economics in French (F, S; 3) Andre 

Daniere 

Sc 441 Comparative Health Systems: France, West Germany and 

the United States (F, S; 3) Jeanne GuiJJemin 

Mc 022 Computer Science (F, S; 3) Marc Shapiro 

Mj 681 France, the EEC and World Trade (F, S; 3) Frank /. 

Parker, S.J. 

Irish Studies 

Irish Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to the culture 
and society of Ireland. Individual courses cover the areas of social, 
political, and economic history, literature, medieval art, sociol- 
ogy, and the Irish language. In addition, there are several courses 
that are jointly taught by faculty from various disciplines. These 
include: a three-semester sequence of courses integrating the his- 
tory and literature of Ireland from the eighteenth to the twentieth 
centuries; a study tour in Ireland, a one-semester course culmi- 
nating in three weeks of field study in Ireland. 

Irish Studies offers a junior year Irish Studies Program at Uni- 
versity College, Cork, which provides intensive exposure in areas 
of Irish ethnography, folklore, and anthropology. Interested stu- 
dents should apply to the Junior Year Abroad Office or see Pro- 
fessors Adele Dalsimer and Kevin O'Neill of the English and 
History Departments. 

Specific courses in the Irish Studies Program are listed below. 
Detailed descriptions may be found under the appropriate De- 
partmental listings. 

Students interested in studying the Irish language should con- 
sult the Evening College Catalogue. 

Hs 115 Cultural History of Irish People (F; 3) Kevin O'Neill 

Hs 417/En 500 Politics and Literature of Irish Freedom (F; 3) 

Kevin O'Neill, Adele Dalsimer 

Sc 495 Ireland: Society in Transition (S; 3) John Donovan 

Hs 618 19th Century Ireland: The Human Crisis (S; 3) Kevin 

O'Neill 

En 501 Major Irish Writers (S; 3) Adele Dalsimer 

En 506 Twentieth Century Irish Poetry Adele Dalsimer 

Students interested in the Irish Studies Program should contact 
Professor Adele Dalsimer of the English Department, Carney 439, 
x3723 or Professor Kevin O'Neill of the History Department, Car- 
ney 162, x3793. 

Medieval Studies 

This interdisciplinary program is designed to give undergraduates 
a comprehensive view of the medieval period, including such 
subjects as history, geography, linguistics, literature, art, philos- 
ophy, theology, and science. 

Some courses which may be taken in the Medieval Studies 
Program are listed below. Detailed descriptions may be found 
under the appropriate Departmental listings. 

En 600 Contemporaries of Chaucer (F; 3) Raymond Biggar 

En 315 Chaucer: The Cantebury Tales (S; 3) Raymond Biggar 

En 331 Courtly Love (F; 3) Joseph Longo 

En 601 Arthurian Legend (F; 3) Charles Regan 

En 605 Old English (F; 3) Charles Regan 

En 317 Chaucer (F; 3) Richard Schroder 

En 320 Modern Arthurian Literature (S; 3) Richard Schroder 

Fa 221 Art of the Early Medieval World (F; 3) Pamela Berger 

Fa 222 Art of the Later Medieval World (F; 3) Pamela Berger 

Fa 428 Seminar in Manuscript Illumination (S; 3) Pamela 

Berger 

Gra 239 German Literature of the High Middle Ages (S; 3) 

Michael Resler 

Hs 207; Th 152 Islamic Civilization in the Middle East (F; 3) 

Benjamin Braude 

Hs 337 Late Roman Empire (F; 3) John Rosser 

Hs 338 Byzantine Empire (S; 3) John Rosser 

Hs 323.91 Archaeological Expedition to Cyprus (Summer 

Session; 3) John Rosser 

PI 340 Philosophy in the Middle Ages I & II (F, S; 3, 3) Norman 

Wells 



Rl 616 Survey of Medical Spanish Literature (F, S; 3, 3) 

Guillermo L. Guitarte 

SI 317 Old Russian (F; 3) Michael /. Connolly 

SI 221/Th 198 The Language of Liturgy (S; 3) Michael /. 

Connolly 

Th 581 The Theology of St. Thomas (F; 3) Stephen Brown 

Th 474 Six Medieval Theologians (S; 3) Stephen Brown 

Th 129-30 Christianity: The Medieval Experience (F, S; 3, 3) 

Patricia DeLeeuw 

Th 477 Church as State: The Development of Structures of 

Authority in the Medieval Church (S; 3) Patricia DeLeeuw 

Information about this program is available from Professor Patri- 
cia DeLeeuw of the Theology Department, Carney 402, x3894. 

Middle Eastern Studies 

This program emphasizes the interdisciplinary study of the Mid- 
dle East from the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the 
present. Through a sequence of courses it offers preparation in 
Middle Eastern Studies useful for careers such as journalism, 
diplomacy, business, social service as well as graduate programs 
of academic and professional training. It promotes and encour- 
ages lectures and discussions on the Middle East for the benefit 
of the entire Boston College community. It also acts as a center 
for information on academic travel and study in the region. 
Courses cover the social, economic, political, cultural, and reli- 
gious heritage as well as contemporary developments in their 
regional and world settings. In addition to the courses listed be- 
low we alert students to courses in the languages, literatures, and 
religions of the Middle East offered by the Departments of The- 
ology and Slavic and Eastern Languages and by Boston Univer- 
sity, Brandeis University, Hebrew College, and Tufts University 
for Boston College credit under the Cross Registration Program. 
Detailed descriptions may be found under the appropriate De- 
partmental listings. 

Hs 207/Th 151 Islamic Civilization in the Middle East (F; 3) 

Benjamin Braude 

Hs 208 The Middle East in the Twentieth Century (S; 3) 

Benjamin Braude 

Hs 3 15/ Th 315 Christians and Jews under Islam: Nation-Building 

(F; 3) Benjamin Braude 

Hs 338 The Byzantine Empire (S; 3) John Rosser 

Hs 500 Iran in the Twentieth Century (S; 3) Ali Banuazizi 

Hs 627 Travelers and Spies in the Middle East: Lawrence of 

Arabia and His Colleagues (F; 3) Benjamin Braude 

Po 426 Revolution and Social Change in the Contemporary 

Middle East (F; 3) Rolf Wichmann 

Po 453 Seminar on Politics and Social Change in the 

Contemporary Middle East (F; 3) Rolf Wichmann 

Students interested in this program should contact Professor Ben- 
jamin Braude, History Department, Carney 146, x3787; Professor 
Rolf Wichmann, Political Science Department, McGuinn 344, 
x4179; or Professor Ali Banuazizi, Psychology Department, 
McGuinn 324, x4124. 

Program for the Study of Peace and War 

Since its inception in 1971, the Boston College Program for the 
Study of Peace and War has provided students with opportunities 
to study and act upon questions related to violence and conflict 
management. The goal of the program is to challenge the uni- 
versity community to confront the nature of war and injustice, 
explore alternatives to these problems, and to construct new in- 
stitutions and values which encourage peaceful relationships 
among individuals, groups, and nations. 

Two interdisciplinary courses, Perspectives on War, Aggres- 
sion, and Conflict Resolution, Part I & II, form the core of the 
program. Instituted in 1974, these courses have involved faculty 
from the departments of History, Sociology, Theology, Philoso- 
phy, Psychology, Economics, Physics, and Political Science. Per- 
spectives I is devoted primarily to an investigation of the causes 
of war and conflict while Perspectives II presents a series of al- 
ternatives to war and injustice. 



Arts and Sciences / 21 

BIOLOGY 



A student who is interested in pursuing further studies in this 
area may elect two other interdisciplinary offerings. One such 
course, The Crisis of World Hunger, offered jointly by the Eco- 
nomics, Sociology and Theology departments, is an investigation 
of the nature of the world hunger problem from various perspec- 
tives. Its sister course, entitled Energy and Global Conflict, ex- 
plores the implications of increasingly scarce energy resources 
for actual and potential international conflict. Both courses seek 
to integrate analysis of the problems with prescriptions for so- 
lutions. 

In addition to the four interdisciplinary courses sponsored by 
the program, an interested student may elect other courses from 
within the university to build an integrated program in Peace 
Studies. While curriculum development has been our main focus, 
the program also sponsors numerous extracurricular activities. 
We conduct a regular film series, sponsor lecture series, and or- 
ganize conferences on issues of interest to the Boston College 
Community. Students interested in this program should contact 
John Mullaney, S.J., x3514. 

Women's Studies 

The Committee for Women's Studies coordinates courses which 
explore directly or offer important perspectives on the changing 
role of women in the institutions that shape public and private 
life. Offerings include courses in history, literature, philosophy, 
sociology, psychology, political science, economics and other 
fields. In addition, an Introduction to Feminism seminar course 
is student-taught under faculty direction. The Committee pro- 
vides direction for students interested in exploring a sequence 
of Women's Studies courses or in constructing an Independent 
Major. Listings in Women's Studies follow. Detailed descriptions 
may be found under the appropriate Departmental listings. 

En 125/Sc 225 Introduction to Feminism (F; 3) (S; 3) Judith WiJt 

En 381 Bronte, Eliot, Woolf (F; 3) Eileen Barrett 

Hs 297 Women in Russian History and Culture (F; 3) Roberta 

Manning 

Sc 363 Women at Work (F; 3) SharJene Hesse-Biber 

Pi 246 Contemporary Women in Philosophy (F; 3) (S; 3) Patricia 

Bowen 

PI 278 Philosophy of Women (F; 3) (S; 3) Patricia Bowen 

En 383 Dickinson and Woolf (S; 3) Judith Wilt 

Hs 250 Women's Experience in America (F; 3) Janet James 

Bk 297/Sc 119 Perspectives on Black Women (S; 3) Amanda 

Houston 

For further information contact Professor Judith Wilt, English 
Department, x3705. 



Senior Awards and Honors 

Scholar of the College: For unusual scholarly and/or creative tal- 
ent as demonstrated in coursework and the Scholar's project. 
Candidates for Scholar of the College are nominated by the de- 
partment chairperson and selected by the Dean in their Junior 
year. 

Order of the Cross and Crown: For Senior men and women who, 
while achieving an average of at least 3.5, have established records 
of unusual service and leadership on the campus. 
Bapst Philosophy Medal: For overall outstanding performance in 
philosophy courses. 

George F. Bemis Award: For distinguished service to others. 
Albert A. Bennett Award: To a member of the Senior Class who 
has demonstrated a high level of mathematical achievement and 
has shown interest in and desire for a career in teaching. 
Wendy Berson Award: For excellence in Romance Languages. 
Alice Bourneuf Award: For excellence in Economics. 
Francis A. Brick Award: For outstanding character, loyalty, lead- 
ership, and scholarship during four years at Boston College. 
Brendan Connolly Award: For outstanding love of books and 
learning. 

Cardinal Cushing Award: For the best creative literary compo- 
sition published in a Boston College undergraduate periodical. 
Patrick Durcan Award: For overall outstanding performance in 
history courses. 



Mary A. and {Catherine G. Finneran Commencement Award: For 
outstanding success in studies while also devoting time and tal- 
ents to other activities for the enrichment of the college and stu- 
dent life. 

General Excellence Medal: For general excellence in all branches 
of studies during the entire four years at Boston College. 
William A. Kean Memorial Award: To that member of the grad- 
uating class deemed the outstanding English major. 
William J. Kenealy Award: To a graduating Senior who has been 
distinguished in academic work and social concern. 
Mark J. Kennedy Medical Scholarship: A medical scholarship in 
memory of Mark J. Kennedy (1959-1979), Class of 1981, given 
to a student who has been accepted to a medical school and who 
has been outstanding in character, leadership and scholarship. 
Allison R. Macomber, Jr. Award in the Fine Arts: For outstanding 
work in the Fine Arts in honor of Allison R. Macomber, Jr., Artist- 
in-Residence at Boston College, 1963-1979, whose presence and 
teaching opened the eyes not only of his students but of the entire 
community to the greatness and wonders of art. 
Albert McGuinn Award: For excellence in a science or mathe- 
matics major combined with achievement — either academic, ex- 
tracurricular, or a combination of both — in the social sciences or 
humanities. 

John F. Norton Award: To the student who best personifies the 
tradition of humanistic scholarship. 

Cardinal O'Connell Theology Medal: For overall outstanding per- 
formance in theology courses. 

Harry W. Smith Award: To a Senior who has used personal talents 
to an exceptional degree in the service of others. 
Joseph Stanton Award: To a student who has been accepted to 
a medical school and who has been outstanding in character, 
loyalty, leadership, and scholarship at Boston College. 
Tully Theology Award: For the best paper on a theological sub- 
ject. 

Nominations for these awards may be submitted to the Office 
of the Dean. 



Areas of Major Study 

The philosophy and objectives of each major are presented below, 
along with specific course requirements. These requirements in- 
clude the number of courses, as well as specific courses or dis- 
tribution requirements necessary for the major. They may also 
include requirements for achieving departmental honors. 

In a liberal arts college, the major is not only a path to some 
future profession, but is itself, together with core courses, and 
electives taken in other areas, a liberal arts experience. A major 
is a systematic concentration of courses taken in a given academic 
discipline which enables a student to acquire a somewhat more 
specialized knowledge of the methodologies used in the disci- 
pline, their origins, their possibilities and limitations, and the 
current state of the art. This is done by means of a hierarchical 
sequence of courses or by appropriate distribution requirements. 
Attention is to be given to the history of the discipline, its various 
methodologies and research tools, and to its various subfields, 
and to the areas of concern in which the discipline is presently 
involved. 

The term course in the descriptions below refers to a course of 
at least 3 semester-hour credits. 



Biology 



Faculty 

Professor* Maurice Liss, A.B., Harvard University; Ph.D., Tufts 
University School of Medicine 

Professor Jolane Solomon, A.B., Hunter College; A.M., Ph.D., Rad- 
cliffe College 

Professor William D. Sullivan, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
M.S., Fordham University; Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

Professor Yu-Chen Ting, A.B., National Honan University; M.S., 



22 / Arts and Sciences 

BIOLOGY 



University of Kentucky; M.S. A., Cornell University; Ph.D., Lou- 
isiana State University 

Professor Chai H. Yoon, A.B., Alma College; Ph.D., Ohio State 

University 

Associate Professor Maria L. Bade, B.S., M.S., University of Ne- 
braska; Ph.D., Yale University Medical School 

Associate Professor Walter J. Fimian Jr., A.B., University of Ver- 
mont; M.S., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Associate Professor James J. Gilroy, B.S., University of Scranton; 
M.S., Catholic University; Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Associate Professor Jonathan J. Goldthwaite, Chairman of the De- 
partment 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley 

Associate Professor Joseph A. Orlando, B.S., Merrimack College; 
M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., University of Califor- 
nia, Berkeley 

Associate Professor William H. Petri, A.B., Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley 

Associate Professor Donald J. Plocke, S.J., B.S., Yale University; 
A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy 

Associate Professor Allyn H. Rule, B.S., Central Connecticut Col- 
lege; A.M., Ph.D., Boston University 

Associate Professor Chester S. Stachow, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Manitoba 

Assistant Professor Joseph S. Levine, A. B., Tufts University; A.M., 
Boston University Marine Program; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity 

Assistant Professor R. Douglas Powers, A.B., SUNY; Ph.D., Syra- 
cuse University 

Assistant Professor Raymond E. Sicard, A.B., Merrimack College; 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Lecturer Mary D. Albert, B.S., University of New Hampshire; A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College; Ph.D., Brown University 



Program Description 

The goal to be attained by the student is knowledge and under- 
standing of the fundamentals of biological science. The biology 
program provides a foundation for advanced study in various 
basic and applied areas of biology. These include the health- 
related professions as well as a diversity of other careers. Formal 
course offerings, laboratory work, and individual research proj- 
ects under the guidance of a faculty advisor offer the student 
opportunity for individual initiative and creativity. 

Requirements: One year each of general chemistry (Ch 109-110), 
organic chemistry, (Ch 231-232), and physics (Ph 211-212), each 
with the accompanying laboratory course, and one year of cal- 
culus. (Mt 100-101). Within the department, the following 
courses are required: Introductory Biology and Laboratory (Bi 
200-202, Bi 201-203), Genetics and Laboratory (Bi 300-301) and 
Bacteriology and Laboratory (Bi 310—311). Three additional upper 
division elective courses in biology, exclusive of Undergraduate 
Research and Tutorial, complete the minimal requirements for 
students in the Class of 1984 and earlier classes. Five upper di- 
vision electives are required for students in the Class of 1985 and 
later classes. Students are generally advised to take additional 
courses in biology and related areas. Those planning to pursue 
graduate studies in basic science are especially encouraged to 
take courses such as biochemistry, physical chemistry and ana- 
lytical chemistry. 

Although there is no formal biochemistry major available in 
the university, students wishing to concentrate in that area should 
consider developing an Independent Major in Biochemistry (see 
Special Academic programs in the Arts and Sciences section of 
this Bulletin). This would involve courses offered by the depart- 
ments of Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics. 



Course Offerings 



An asterisk after a course title indicates that a course carries a 
laboratory fee. Courses numbered 500—599 are for undergraduate 
and graduate registration. 

Bi 100 Survey of Biology I (F; 3) 

A survey of Biology without laboratory, designed for students 
who have had no previous courses in biology. The course mainly 
discusses man with emphasis on the following areas: cellular 
structure, function, chemistry, and the anatomy and physiology 
of the major organ systems of the body and how they are influ- 
enced by internal and external factors. Three lectures per 
week. The Department 

Bi 102 Survey of Biology II (S; 3) 

A continuation of Bi 100. The topics discussed are: development, 
classical and molecular genetics, evolution, ecology, and behav- 
ior. The Department 

Bi 110 General Biology I (F; 3) 

A course designed to bring to the attention of students the rele- 
vance of biology to everyday life and to illustrate application of 
the scientific method to problems of biology. Living organisms 
are considered with respect to their function in isolation (topics 
discussed include diversity, physiology, metabolism, genetics, 
and development), and their function in association (topics dis- 
cussed include behavior, population dynamics, ecology, evolu- 
tion). Three lectures per week. The Department 

Bi 111 General Biology Laboratory I* (F; 1) 

Required of students taking Bi 110. One two-hour laboratory pe- 
riod per week. The Department 



Bi 112 General Biology II (S; 3) 

A continuation of Biology 110. 



The Department 



Bi 113 General Biology Laboratory II* (S; 1) 

Required of all students taking Bi 112. One two-hour laboratory 
period per week. The Department 

Bi 130 Anatomy and Physiology I (F; 3) 

An intensive introductory course designed to bring out the cor- 
relations between the structure and functions of the various body 
systems. Each system discussed is treated from microscopic to 
macroscopic levels of organization. The course is intended for 
students preparing for a career in nursing. A limited number of 
other students may be admitted only with permission of the in- 
structor. Raymond E. Sicard 

Bi 131 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I* (F; 1) 

Laboratory exercises intended to familiarize the students with the 
various structures and principles discussed in Bi 130 through the 
use of anatomical models, physiological experiments and limited 
dissection. One two-hour laboratory period per week. Required 
of students taking Bi 130. Raymond E. Sicard 

Bi 132 Anatomy and Physiology II (S; 3) 

A continuation of Bi 130. R. Douglas Powers 

Bi 133 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II* (S; 1) 

A continuation of Bi 131. Required of students taking Bi 132. 

R. Douglas Powers 

Bi 200 Introductory Biology I (F; 3) 

An introduction to living systems at the molecular, cellular, 
organismal and population levels of organization. Three lectures 
per week. Required for biology majors. The Department 

Bi 201 Introductory Biology Laboratory I* (F; 1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Required of all stu- 
dents taking Bi 200. The Department 

Bi 202 Introductory Biology II (S; 3) 

A continuation of Bi 200. Required for biology majors. 

The Department 

Bi 203 Introductory Biology Laboratory II* (S; 1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Required of all stu- 
dents taking Bi 202. The Department 

Bi 220 Microbiology (F; 2) 

Prerequisites: Bi 130-132 



Arts and Sciences / 23 

BIOLOGY 



A study of the basic physiological and biochemical activities of 
microorganisms; effective methods of destruction; mechanisms 
of drug action on microorganisms; and the application of serol- 
ogical and immunological principles. Two lectures per week. 

Elinor M. O'Brien 

Bi 221 Microbiology Laboratory* (F; 1) 

One two-hour laboratory period per week. To be taken in con- 
junction with Bi 220. Elinor M. O'Brien 

Bi 300 Genetics (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Bi 200-202 

This is an introductory course in the principles and physical 
basis of heredity, which will include a discussion of the concepts 
of theoretical and applied genetics. Three lectures per week. Re- 
quired for biology majors. William H. Petri 

Yu-Chen Ting 
Chai H. Yoon 

Bi 301 Genetics Laboratory* (F, S; 1) 

To be taken in conjunction with Bi 300. One three-hour laboratory 
per week. Required for biology majors. William H. Petri 

Yu-Chen Ting 
Chai H. Yoon 

Bi 310 Bacteriology (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Bi 200-202, Ch 231 taken concurrently or previ- 
ously. 

A study of microorganisms as examples of independent cellular 
life forms, as agents of disease and as contributors to the envi- 
ronment of plants, animals, and man. Three lectures per week. 
Required for biology majors. James /. Gilroy 

Chester S. Stachow 

Bi 311 Bacteriology Laboratory* (F, S; 1) 

To be taken in conjunction with Bi 310. One three and one-half 
hour laboratory every other week. Required for biology 
majors. James J. Gilroy 

Chester S. Stachow 

Bi 406 Cell Biology (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Bi 200-202 

Cellular and molecular aspects of selected biological processes 
will be covered. Topics will include the immune system, effects 
of animal viruses on cells, cell prototypes and specialized func- 
tions of animal cells. Maurice Liss 

Bi 410 From Cells to Chromosomes 

Not offered 1982-1983 

Bi 411 From Cells to Chromosomes Laboratory* 

Not offered 1982-1983 

Bi 420 Comparative Vertebrate Embryology (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Bi 200-202 

A study of the anatomy and physiology of reproduction, gameto- 
genesis and the early stages of development of the chick and 
mammalian embryo. Walter J. Fimian, Jr. 

Bi 426 Comparative Vertebrate Morphogenesis (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Bi 200-202 

The basic principles of vertebrate morphogenesis, with emphasis 
on evolutionary history, comparative anatomy, and embryologi- 
cal development. Mary D. Albert 

Bi 427 Comparative Vertebrate Morphogenesis Laboratory* 
(S; 1) 

Laboratory exercises to accompany Bi 426. Required of all stu- 
dents taking Bi 426. Mary D. Albert 

Bi 430 Histology (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Bi 200-202 

A study of human tissues and organs by means of the microscope; 
the correlation of histology to gross anatomy, physiology, bio- 
chemistry, embryology, and pathology. Kodachromes are used 
during lectures to illustrate some of these principles. There will 



be motion pictures on gross anatomy, cytology and surgery. Three 
lectures per week. Allyn H. Rule 

Bi 431 Histology Laboratory* (S; 1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Required of all stu- 
dents in Bi 430. Allyn H. Rule 

Bi 440 Molecular Biology (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Bi 200-202, Ch 231-232 

An introduction to the study of the structure, synthesis and func- 
tion of nucleic acids and proteins. Topics will include methods 
for studying the structure of macromolecules, synthesis, structure 
and function of nucleic acids and proteins, kinetics and mech- 
anism of enzyme action and biochemical regulatory mechanisms. 
Three lectures per week. Donald J. Plocke, S.J. 

Bi 442 Principles of Ecology (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Bi 200-202, Ch 109-110 or permission of instructor 
Readings in and discussion of principles and concepts in modern 
ecological theory. The Department 

Bi 446 Marine Biology (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Bi 200—202 and permission of instructor. 
An introduction to marine organisms, accompanied by discussion 
of morphological, physiological and behavioral adaptations to the 
marine environment, will be followed by in-depth analysis of 
selected marine ecosystems. Special topics to be considered at 
semester's end include aquaculture, marine biomedicine and ef- 
fects of pollution on marine ecosystems. 
Three required field trips. Two lectures per week. 

Joseph S. Levine 

Bi 448 Comparative Animal Physiology (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Bi 200-202 

This is a course about how animals function as well as why they 
function as they do; thus, stress will be laid on problems to animal 
survival posed by the environment in which they live, and on 
the various alternative solutions to those problems that have been 
evolved by different animal groups, both vertebrate and inver- 
tebrate. The interplay of the fitness of the environment and the 
fitness of animals to survive in it will be explored. 

Marie L. Bade 

Bi 450 Principles of Physiology (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Bi 310 

A study of the fundamental principles and physicochemical 
mechanisms underlying cellular and organismal function. Mam- 
malian organ-systems will be studied, with emphasis on cardi- 
ovascular, respiratory and renal function and the endocrine 
regulation of metabolism. R. Douglas Powers 

Bi 451 Principles of Physiology Laboratory (F; 1) 

One three-hour laboratory per week. Optional course associated 
with Bi 450. R. Douglas Powers 

Bi 458 Plant Biology (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Bi 200-202 

Beginning with a discussion of the major evolutionary trends in 
plants, the course will study blue-green algae, slime molds and 
fungi, followed by a discussion of eucaryotic algae, mosses and 
primitive tracheophytes and concluding with a survey of the gym- 
nosperms and angiosperms. Mary D. Albert 

Bi 459 Plant Biology Laboratory (F; 1) 

Laboratory exercises to accompany Bi 458. 



Mary D. Albert 



Bi 460 Understanding Evolution 

Not offered 1982-1983 



Bi 461-463 Undergraduate Research* (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the chairperson 

Undergraduate students of advanced standing may participate in 

research projects in the laboratory of a faculty member. 

The Department 

Bi 465-467 Advanced Undergraduate Research* (F, S; 3, 3) 

Seniors who have completed at least one semester of undergrad- 
uate research may enroll in this course with the permission of 
the chairperson. The Department 

Bi 470 Introduction to Biochemistry (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ch 231-232 



24 / Arts and Sciences 

CHEMISTRY 



A study of the biochemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic 
acids, proteins, enzymes and coenzymes. Certain aspects of elec- 
tron transport, bioenergetics, gene action, control mechanisms 
and macromolecular biosynthesis will also be included. Two 
seventy-five minute lectures per week. Joseph A. Orlando 

Bi 471 Introduction to Biochemistry Laboratory* (S; 1) 

Laboratory exercises to accompany Bi 470. Joseph A. Orlando 

Bi 490 Tutorial in Biology (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and chairperson 

A directed study through assigned readings and discussions of 

various areas of the biological sciences. The Department 

Bi 493—495 Current Concepts in Cancer Chemotherapy* 

Not offered 1982-1983 

Bi 496—498 Seminar in Carcinogenesis 

Not offered 1982-1983 

Bi 510 General Endocrinology (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Bi 200-202 

A study of phylogenesis of endocrine systems; the embryology, 
gross and microscopic anatomy of endocrine glands; the bio- 
chemical and hormone action including clinical considerations. 
Two two-hour lectures per week. Jolane Solomon 

Bi 520 Plant Physiology (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Bi 200-202 

A structural and functional study of physiological processes in 
developing and mature plants. Topics include nutrition, vascular 
transport, photosynthesis; and the regulation of growth, differ- 
entiation, flowering and aging by environmental and hormonal 
factors. Agricultural, ecological and industrial applications of 
these topics are pointed out. Two lectures per week and a term 
paper. Jonathan Goldthwaite 

Bi 521 Plant Physiology Laboratory* (S; 1) 

One three-hour laboratory per week. Optional, can be taken in 
conjunction with Bi 520. Jonathan Goldthwaite 

Bi 538 Biology of Cell Cycle 

Not offered 1982-1983 

Bi 540 Immunology (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Bi 200-202, Ch 109-110 

The biology of the immune response: cell-cell interactions, an- 
tibody synthesis, the immunoglobulins, evolution of self recog- 
nition vs. nonself (antigen), antigenicity, antibody-antigen 
reactions, immune protection, immune destruction, and prob- 
lems in cancer and transplantation immunity. The course will 
consist of a series of lectures, group seminars and guest speakers. 
Two seventy-five minute lectures per week. Allyn H. Rule 

Bi 552 Neurobiology (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

The development, structure, and function of the nervous system. 
A study of factors influencing neurogenesis, organization of the 
nervous system, electrochemical behavior of nervous tissue, 
inter- and intracellular communication and neuroendocrine 
interactions. Raymond E. Sicard 

Bi 556 Developmental Biology (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Bi 300 or permission of instructor 
Modern aspects of developmental biology with emphasis on mo- 
lecular and cellular interaction in developmental processes. 

William H. Petri 

Bi 560 Biological Statistics (S; 2) 

Prerequisite: Bi 200-202 

A discussion of probability, chi-square, t-distribution and Poisson 

distribution, as well as various correlations. Chai H. Yoon 



Chemistry 



Bi 561 Biological Statistics Workshop (S; 1) 

Required of all undergraduates enrolled in Bi 560. 



Chai H. Yoon 



Faculty 

Professor Joseph Bornstein, B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology 

Professor Paul Davidovits, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Professor Andre J. de Bethune, B.S., St. Peter's College; Ph.D., 
Columbia University 

Professor T. Ross Kelly, B.S., Holy Cross College; Ph.D., University 
of California at Berkeley 

Professor Jeong-long Lin, Chairman of the Department 

B.S., M.S., National Taiwan University; Ph.D., Queen's University 

at Ontario 

Professor Robert F. O'Malley, B.S., M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Professor Yuh-kang Pan, B.S., National Taiwan University; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University 

Professor Dennis J. Sardella, B.S. Boston College; Ph.D., Illinois 
Institute of Technology 

Professor George Vogel, B.S., D.Sc, Prague Technical University 

Associate Professor O. Francis Bennett, B.S., Bridgewater State 
College; M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity 

Associate Professor E. Joseph Billo, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., McMaster 
University 

Associate Professor Michael Clarke, A.B., Catholic University; 
M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Associate Professor Evan R. Kantrowitz, A.B., Boston University; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professsor David McFadden, A.B., Occidental College; 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor Kenneth M. Nicholas, B.S., State University of 
New York at Stony Brook; Ph.D., University of Texas 

Lecturer Clarence C. Shubert, S.J., B.S., Spring Hill College; M.S., 
Canisius College; S.T.L., Woodstock College; Ph.D., Princeton 



Program Description 

The Chemistry Department offers a flexible curriculum to those 
who wish to acquire a knowledge of chemistry within the envi- 
ronment of a liberal arts college. Two levels of concentration are 
offered to the chemistry major. First, there is the professional 
degree program intended for students who wish to prepare for 
graduate school as well as for those who will enter the chemical 
profession directly from college. Second, there is a degree pro- 
gram requiring a lesser concentration in chemistry for those stu- 
dents who wish to combine molecular science with intensive 
studies in other disciplines, such as computer science, mathe- 
matics, economics, social sciences, business, law, humanities, 
psychology, medicine, physics or biology. 

Requirements: Two semesters of general chemistry (Ch 109-110) 
and laboratory; two semesters of organic chemistry (Ch 231-232) 
and laboratory; one semester of analytical chemistry (Ch 351) and 
laboratory; two semesters of physical chemistry (Ch 475—476); 
one semester of inorganic chemistry (Ch 520); three advanced 
electives (numbered in the 500's) one of which must include a 
laboratory as part of the course. Physics and calculus are taken 
in the first year along with general chemistry. Intermediate cal- 
culus should be taken the following year. Two semesters of Ger- 
man are strongly recommended and should be taken during the 
first three years. For the professional degree program, the rec- 
ommendations of the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Com- 
mittee on Professional Training should be followed: a second 
semester of analytical chemistry; a semester of qualitative organic 
analysis, one semester of physical chemistry laboratory, advanced 
work in senior year in the traditional areas of chemistry or in 
areas such as independent research or advanced courses in math- 



Arts and Sciences / 25 

CHEMISTRY 



ematics or sciences given outside the department. The Chemistry 
Department is approved by the A.C.S. Committee on Professional 
Training. 



Course Offerings 

An asterisk after a course title indicates that a course carries a 
laboratory fee. All courses numbered Ch 500 through Ch 999 have 
as a prerequisite previous courses in organic, analytical and phys- 
ical chemistry. 

Ch 101 Fundamentals of Chemistry (F; 3) 

A course for non-science majors for whom chemistry or a labo- 
ratory science is a requirement. The course treats basic chemical 
concepts and principles drawn from the area of general chemistry. 
The course is applicable to the University Core requirement. Co- 
requisite Ch 103. Robert F. O'Malley 

Ch 102 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or Ch 101 
A one semester course designed for non-science majors for whom 
chemistry or a laboratory science is a requirement. It deals with 
organic and biochemistry including a study of the structures, 
reactions and metabolisms of protein, carbohydrates and lipids. 
The course is applicable to the University Core. Corequisite Ch 
104. Robert F. O'Malley 

Ch 103 Fundamentals of Chemistry Laboratory* (F; 1) 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in Ch 101. One three- 
hour period per week. Robert F. O'Malley 

Ch 104 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry Laboratory* 
(F, S; 1) 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in Ch 102. One three- 
hour period per week. Robert F. O'MaJley 

Ch 105-106 Chemistry and Society (F, S; 3, 3) 

A course designed exclusively for those not majoring in the nat- 
ural sciences. The structure and methodology of science as ex- 
emplified by chemistry is treated along with the practical effects 
of chemistry upon society. The application of chemical principles 
to environmental problems will be stressed. No prior knowledge 
of chemistry is required and the use of mathematics is minimal. 
No laboratory required. The course is applicable to the University 
Core requirement. Andre /. de Bethune 

Ch 109-110 General Chemistry (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry 
This course is intended for students whose major interest is sci- 
ence or medicine. It offers a rigorous introduction to the princi- 
ples of inorganic chemistry, with special emphasis on quantitative 
relationships, chemical equilibrium, and the structures of atoms, 
molecules, and crystals. The properties of the more common ele- 
ments and compounds are considered against a background of 
these principles and the periodic table. The course is applicable 
to the University Core requirement. Corequisites Ch 111-112, Mt 
100-101. Paul Davidovits 

Evan R. Kantrowitz 
Jeong-Iong Lin 

Kenneth M. Nichols 

Ch 111-112 General Chemistry Laboratory* (F, S; 1, 1) 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled Ch 109-110. One 
three-hour period per week. Paul Davidovits 

Evan R. Kantrowitz 

/eong-long Lin 

Kenneth M. Nicholas 

Ch 123-124 Accelerated General Chemistry (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry 
An intensive and demanding course in the fundamentals of chem- 
istry for the prepared and motivated student. Corequisite Ch 
125-126, Mt 110-200. Michael /. Clarke 



Ch 125-126 Accelerated General Chemistry Laboratory* (F, S; 1, 

1) 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in Ch 123-124. One 
three-hour period per week. Michael /. Clarke 

Ch 151 Applications of Science I-Communication (F; 3) 

The course is designed primarily for those not majoring in the 
natural sciences. Chemical and physical principles and devices 
of communication technology will be discussed, including the 
telegraph, telephone, radio, sound reproduction, television, sem- 
iconductors and lasers. Electromagnetic theory will be explained 
and the operation of the electromagnetic devices will be de- 
scribed. Through individual projects, each student will explore 
the role of communication technology in a field of one's own 
interest. A previous science background is not required, and the 
use of mathematics will be kept to a minimum. The course is 
applicable to the University Core requirement. 

Paul Davidovits 

Ch 152 Applications of Science II-Energy (S; 3) 

A course designed exclusively for those not majoring in the nat- 
ural sciences. Energy will be explored as a natural phenomenon 
and the different types will be examined: mechanical work, ki- 
netic and potential energy, heat and thermal energy, electrical, 
chemical (molecular) and nuclear energy. The sources of energy; 
solar, wind and water power, fossil fuels and nuclear fuels will 
be reviewed. The laws of conservation and dissipation of energy 
and the concept of entropy will be discussed. The politics, eco- 
nomics, and ecology, as well as the history, of the concept of 
energy will be touched upon. The use of mathematics will be 
kept to a minimum. The course is applicable to the University 
Core requirement. Andre /. deBethune 

Ch 231-232 Organic Chemistry (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Ch 109-110 

An introduction to the chemistry, properties, and uses of organic 
compounds. Correlation of structure with properties, reaction 
mechanisms, and modern approach to structural and synthetic 
problems are stressed throughout. In the laboratory, the aim is 
acquisition of sound experimental techniques through the syn- 
thesis of selected compounds. Corequisite Ch 233-234. 

O. Francis Bennett 

Joseph Bornstein 

George VogeJ 

Ch 233-234 Organic Chemistry Laboratory* (F, S; 1, 1) 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in Ch 231-232. One 
four-hour period per week. Corequisite Ch 231-232. 

O. Francis Bennett 

Joseph Bornstein 

George Vogel 

Ch 235-236 Accelerated Organic Chemistry (F, S; 3, 3) 

An intensive course in the principles of organic chemistry for the 
prepared and motivated student. Corequisite Ch 237-238. 

T. Ross Kelly 

Ch 237-238 Accelerated Organic Chemistry Laboratory 
(F, S; 1, 1) 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in Ch 235-236. Co- 
requisite Ch 235-236. One four-hour period per week. 

T. Ross Kelly 

Ch 351-352 Analytical Chemistry (F, S; 4, 4) 

Prerequisite: Ch 109-110 or Ch 123-124 

A study of the fundamental chemical laws and the theory of 
solutions as applied to analytical chemistry. Volumetric and gra- 
vimetric methods will be emphasized in the first semester and 
instrumental procedures in the second semester. Corequisite Ch 
353-354. E. Joseph Billo 

Ch 353-354 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory* (F, S; 0, 0) 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in Ch 351-352. One 
four-hour period per week. Corequisite Ch 351-352. 

E. Joseph Billo 

Ch 391-392 Undergraduate Research (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Ch 109-110, Ch 231-232, Mt 100-101, and the 
consent of the chairperson of the department. Ch 591-592 cannot 
be taken concurrently. 



26 / Arts and Sciences 

CLASSICAL STUDIES 



Undergraduates who have shown exceptional ability engage in 
an independent research project under the supervision of a fac- 
ulty member. The experimental work will be preceded by library 
research on the project and training in essential laboratory tech- 
niques. A written report and an oral presentation are 
required. The Department 

Ch 471-472 Introductory Physical Chemistry (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Ch 109-110, Mt 100-101 

A two-semester course designed for those who are not chemistry 
majors, but desire a foundation in topics traditionally treated, 
such as thermodynamics and kinetic theory. It offers a view of 
the major areas of the field adapted for biology, geology or other 
science majors in the junior or senior year. 

Clarence C. Schubert, S.J. 

Ch 475 Physical Chemistry I (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ch 231-232, Mt 200-201, Ph 211-212 
Fundamental principles and applications of equilibrium thermo- 
dynamics. David L. McFadden 

Ch 476 Physical Chemistry II (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ch 475 

An introduction to reaction rate theory, quantum mechanics and 

spectroscopy as applied to atomic and molecular systems. 

David L. McFadden 

NOTE: All courses numbered Ch 500 through Ch 999 have as a 
prerequisite previous courses in organic, analytical and physical 
chemistry except Ch 552 and Ch 561. 

Ch 520 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry (S; 3) 

An introduction to the principles of inorganic chemistry with 
emphasis on structural and thermodynamic aspects. 

E. Joseph Billo 

Ch 522 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory* (S; 3) 

A course in inorganic synthesis including characterization of the 
products. Kenneth M. Nicholas 

Ch 534 Organic Synthesis (S; 3) 

The most useful reactions of organic chemistry will be discussed 
in detail and practical applications made. Joseph Bornstein 

Ch 535 Physical Organic Chemistry (F; 3) 

A survey of methods useful in determination of reaction pathways 
in organic chemistry. Dennis /. Sardella 

Ch 536 Organic Synthesis Laboratory* (S; 3) 

Methods, techniques, and reactions used in the preparation of 
organic compounds that offer more than usual difficulty. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Joseph Bornstein 

Ch 538 Organic Spectroscopy (S; 3) 

The theory and uses of infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, 
mass, and ultraviolet spectroscopy in structural elucidation are 
discussed at a level above that of a beginning course in organic 
chemistry. No prior knowledge of the field is assumed. 

George VogeJ 

Ch 541 Determination of Organic Structures (F; 4) 
Prerequisite: Ch 231-232 

The course is designed to introduce the student to the method- 
ology of organic chemical research while at the same time af- 
fording him or her a deeper insight into the chemical and physical 
properties of functional groups. The elucidation of the structures 
of a number of organic compounds is carried out by a combination 
of classical and modern instrumental methods; separative tech- 
niques as well as small-scale degradative and synthetic experi- 
mentation are stressed in the process. Practice in the carrying out 
of literature searches and in the solution of numerous textbook 
problems in structural organic chemistry are additional features 
of the course. Corequisite Ch 543. O. Francis Bennett 

Ch 543 Determination of Organic Structure Laboratory* (F; 0) 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in Ch 541. Two four- 
hour laboratory periods per week. Corequisite Ch 541. 

O. Francis Bennett 

Ch 551 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (S; 4) 

A consideration of modern instrumental methods of analysis, 
including atomic emission and absorption, ultraviolet, visible, 



infrared and Raman spectrometry, fluorometry, x-ray methods, 
electroanalytical methods and gas chromatography. Three lec- 
tures and one four-hour laboratory per week. May not be taken 
without Ch 553. Ivan C. Mef/ord 

Ch 553 Advanced Analytical Chemistry Laboratory* (S; 0) 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in Ch 551. 

Ivan C. Mefford 

Ch 561 Biochemistry (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ch 231-232. Recommended: Ch 351-352 
A one-semester introduction to biochemistry. Topics will include 
structure, function and synthesis of proteins; energetics, kinetics 
and mechanisms of biochemical reactions; intermediary metab- 
olism, biochemistry of nucleic acids, and the genetic code. 

Evan R. Kantrowitz 

Ch 566 Bio-inorganic Chemistry (S; 3) 

Discussion of the role of metals in biological systems. Behavior 
of metal ions in aqueous solution. Metal requiring enzymes. In- 
teractions of metal ions with nucleic acids. Transport systems 
involving inorganic ions. Inorganic pharmaceuticals. 

Michael J. Clarke 

Ch 568 Advanced Biochemistry and Enzymology (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ch 561 or equivalent 

A selection of topics which expand upon those in Ch 561. Topics 
will include protein chemistry, enzymology, bioorganic reaction 
mechanisms, and regulation of energy metabolism. 

Ronald W. McCJard 

Ch 571 Physical Chemistry III (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ch 476 

An introduction to statistical thermodynamics and application 

of quantum mechanics to molecular systems. 

David L. McFadden 

Ch 573 Quantum Chemistry and Molecular Structure (F; 3) 

A development of the principles of quantum chemistry as they 
apply to inorganic and organic chemistry. Emphasis on the use 
of molecular orbital method and a discussion of group 
theory. Yuh-kang Pan 

Ch 574 Experimental Physical Chemistry* (S; 3) 

One lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Experiments 
will be chosen to illustrate physical chemical principles, to de- 
velop skills such as constructing circuits and apparatus, the use 
of vacuum techniques, and the operation and calibration of the 
instruments and to reproduce with good accuracy data available 
in the literature, as an introduction to experimental 
research. Clarence C. Schubert, S.J. 

Ch 591-592 Introduction to Chemical Research (F, S; 3, 3) 

The essential feature of this course is an independent research 
project performed under the supervision of a faculty member. 
This is a two semester course and may not be taken for only one 
semester. The individual work will be preceded by a series of 
lectures and demonstrations on the use of the library and several 
essential laboratory techniques. A written report is required at 
the end of the second semester. The Department 



Classical Studies 



Faculty 

Associate Professor Eugene W. Bushala, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment 
A.B., Wayne State University; A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Associate Professor Lowell Edmunds, A.B., Harvard; A.M., Uni- 
versity of California; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor David H. Gill, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
Ph.D., Harvard University; Lie. Theology, St. Georgen, Frankfurt- 
am-Main 

Adjunct Instructor William Batstone, M.A., C.Phil., University of 
California (Berkeley) 



Arts and Sciences / 27 

CLASSICAL STUDIES 



Program Description 



A major in Classics offers an experience of liberal education 
through the study in the original languages and in translation of 
two great literatures which have contributed to the formation of 
Western culture. The department regularly offers introductory 
and intermediate level courses in the Latin and Greek languages 
as well as advanced courses in individual authors. In addition, 
through cooperation with other departments, courses are avail- 
able in the history, art, philosophy and religion of the Ancient 
World. 

There are four different ways in which a student may major in 
Classics. The requirements for each are as follows: 

(1) Major in Greek: 8 courses (beyond introductory) in Greek 
language and literature. 

(2) Major in Latin: 8 courses (beyond introductory) in Latin 
language and literature. 

(3) Major in Classics (Greek and Latin): 12 courses in the orig- 
inal languages. These may include either Elementary Greek or 
Elementary Latin, but not both. 

(4) Major in Classical Civilization (new in 1981-82): 12 
courses, the majority of which may be taken in translation, but 
some knowledge of the languages is required. Requirements: 

(a) Latin or Greek up to the intermediate level. 

(b) Introductory-level course in the other language. 

(c) Two courses in Latin or Greek Literature. 

(d) Two courses in Ancient History. 

(e) Three courses in other areas of Classical Civilization (Art, 
Philosophy, Religion, Mythology, etc.). 

(f) One integrating seminar or reading course in the junior 
or senior year. 

Several courses which apply to the Major in Classical Studies 
are offered each year in departments other than Classics (History, 
Philosophy, Fine Arts, Slavic, Romance Languages, Political Sci- 
ence, Theology). Students should consult at registration time with 
departmental advisers in Classics before selecting courses. 



Course Offerings 

Cl 010-011.01 Elementary Latin/Intensive (F, S; 6, 6) 

This course does not presume any prior knowledge of languages. 
It is designed for serious students who want to continue reading 
Latin and want to proceed at a pace faster than that of the normal 
Latin sequence. The class will meet for lectures and exercises 
three times a week and for drill on forms two times a week. There 
will be frequent quizzes, two midterms and a final. The text has 
not been chosen yet. 

The second semester will be a continuation of the Fall semester 
Intensive Latin. The course will complete the introduction to 
Latin grammar and will include readings in Caesar, Catullus and 
other authors. 

Students who complete the sequence with an A- or better will 
be well prepared to go on to 300 level reading courses. 

William Batstone 
The Department 

CI 010-011.02.03 Elementary Latin (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course will introduce the student to the basic structure and 
forms of the Latin language. The goal will be to prepare the stu- 
dent after one year of study to be able to read some not too difficult 
Latin literature offered in the following intermediate year. 

No prerequisites. The text will be Wheelock's Latin: An Intro- 
ductory Course. Freshmen and Graduate Students are urged to 
elect the section of Cl 010-011.02 which will meet on MWF at 
2:00 and will be taught by Prof. Lowell Edmunds. All other stu- 
dents should elect the section of Cl 010-011.03 taught by Prof. 
Eugene W. Bushala which will meet on MWF at 3:00. 

Lowell Edmunds 
Eugene W. Bushala 

Cl 020-021 Elementary Greek (F, S; 3, 3) 

An intensive introduction to the basic forms and structure of 
ancient Greek. Concentration on forms and syntactical rules is 
necessary in this introductory study and students are expected 



to make liberal use of their memory and time. Eugene W. 
Bushala 

Cl 052-053 Intermediate Greek (F, S; 3, 3) 

A review of the essential grammar of Elementary Greek and an 
introduction to Greek literature. Eugene W. Bushala 

The Department 

Cl 056-057 Intermediate Latin (F, S; 3, 3) 

A thorough review of essential grammatical forms presented in 
Elementary Latin along with a close reading of an introductory 
selection of Roman prose and poetry. Eugene W. Bushala 

The Department 

Cl 209 (Hs 155) History of the Roman Republic (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The course traces the social and political development of the 
Roman Republic from its foundation to the destruction in the 
civil wars of the first century B.C. and will focus on the period 
264-23 B.C. Consideration of the following topics is included in 
this survey: the acquisition of an empire, the nature of Roman 
imperialism, and the social and political description of the first 
century B.C. Sandra Joshel 

Cl 212-213 (Fa 211-212) Art of the Ancient Mediterranean 
World (F, S; 3, 3) 

The visual history and arts of the Ancient Mediterranean world 
will be studied from the rise of civilizations along the Nile, in 
the Holy Land, and Mesopotamia to the fall of the western Roman 
Empire, about 480. Cities, sacred areas, palaces, and building for 
communication, civic services and war will be included, as well 
as painting, sculpture, jewelry, and coinages. 

The Fall Term will emphasize Greek Art to the beginning of 
the Roman Empire. 

The Spring Term will be devoted to Roman Art in its broadest 
sense, beginning with Etruscan and Greek Italy in the Roman 
Republic. Cornelius Vermeule 

Cl 235 (Hs 158) History of the Roman Empire (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The course traces the development of imperial power from the 
foundation of the Principate to the fall of Rome. Emphasis will 
be placed on the social, cultural, and political dynamics of the 
first two centuries A.D. Sandra Joshel 

Cl 313 (Fa 313) Athens in the Age of Pericles (F; 3) 

In the fifth century B.C. the city of Athens was the center of Greek 
artistic and intellectual life. The high classical style that devel-. 
oped here in sculpture, architecture and painting marks a golden 
age of western civilization. This course will study the art and the 
architectural monuments of the Athens that the ancients knew, 
including the topography of the city, tapping both archaeological 
and literary evidence. Kenneth Craig 



Cl 318 Plautus (F; 3) 

Reading in Latin of selected plays of Plautus. 



The Department 



Cl 319 Demosthenes (F; 3) 

All of the de Corona will be read in Greek. Class time will be 
spent primarily on translation and discussion of the text. Grad- 
uate students who take this course will be asked to give pres- 
entations on historical questions and the rhetorical design of the 
speech. William Batstone 

Cl 320 (Th 425) The Greek Fathers (F; 3) 

History of the literary genres of Greek patristic literature, and se- 
lected readings from outstanding authors, with attention to style 
as well as social and intellectual context. Margaret Schatkin 

Cl 323 (Th 423) The Western Fathers (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 

Reading and interpretation of selected works of Latin patristic 

writers. Margaret Schatkin 

Cl 328 Cicero (F; 3) 

We will read in Latin the exordia of several speeches spanning 
Cicero's career and all the pro Milone. Class time will be spent 
primarily on translation and discussion of the rhetorical problems 



28 / Arts and Sciences 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 



Cicero handles in his exordia and in the various sections of the 
pro MiJone. WiJJiam Batstone 

CI 336 Horace, Odes (S; 3) 

We will read Latin selections from Horace's epodes and odes. 
Students will be expected to be able to translate accurately. Class 
time will be spent primarily on literary issues and "close read- 
ings" of the poems. There will be substantial assignments in the 
secondary literature and each student will be asked to take over 
the class for one day: to translate one poem, discuss the meter, 
word order, word choice, shape of the poem and its value (some- 
times called meaning) in terms of the critical literature and the 
student's own experience. William Batstone 

CI 338 The Roman Banquet (F; 3) 

Why did the Romans recline when they ate? Did they like to 
vomit? Did they drink before dinner? What were their favorite 
dishes? What happened at Roman banquets besides eating? These 
and similar questions will be investigated in this course, which 
will study the Roman banquet as an expression of Roman civi- 
lization. 

For students who wish to read some of the Latin sources in the 
original, an extra meeting will be held each week. Classics majors 
who attend this meeting and take an examination on the material 
covered may count this course toward requirements for the 
major. Lowell Edmunds 

CI 363 Aristophanes (S; 3) 

A close reading of the Lysistrata. Study of this work in relation 
to the other "peace plays" and in the context of Athenian 
history. Lowell Edmunds 

CI 390-391 Readings and Research (F, S; 3, 3) 

The Department 

CI 394 Vergil's Aeneid in Translation (S; 3) 

The first three weeks will consist of introductory lectures while 
the students will read the Uiad, the Odyssey, and the Aeneid. 
The rest of the semester will be spent closely examining the 
Aeneid book by book. There will be some reading in the secondary 
literature, but the emphasis will fall on the translations we will 
be using. 

Classics majors who meet for an additional hour each week to 
read Vergil in Latin may count this course for credit toward the 
Classics degree. They will be exempted from the research paper 
due at the end of the semester. 

There are no prerequisites for this course. William Batstone 

CI 416 (PI 344) The Aristotelian Ethics (F; 3) 

Reading of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, and examination of 
its principle themes: happiness, virtue, responsibility, justice, 
moral weakness, friendship, pleasure, contemplation. 

Arthur B. Madigan, S.J. 

CI 418 (PI 418) Later Greek Philosophy: The Search for Meaning 

(S;3) 

In their different ways, the Stoics, Epicureans, Sceptics, and Pla- 
tonists were engaged in search for human meaning. Our aims: to 
follow these philosophers in their quest for meaning; to under- 
stand the reactions of Jewish and Christian thinkers; to see how 
the later Greek quest for meaning relates to modern quests, for 
example, that of Viktor Frankl. Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

CI 424 (PI 638) Plato: Selected Dialogues (F; 3) 

A study of (at most) a half-dozen Platonic dialogues, chosen to 
suit the philosophical interests of instructor and students. For 
students with some background in Plato. Arthur B. Madigan, 
S.J. 

CI 425 Tacitus and Pliny (S; 3) 

Readings in the letters of Pliny the Younger and of parts of Tac- 
itus' Annals (the whole will be read in translation). 

Lowell Edmunds 



CI 435-436 Aeschylus (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Greek 

A reading in Greek of plays of Aeschylus. 



Carl Thayer, S.J. 



CI 451 Greek Lyric Poetry (F; 3) 

"Lyric" is a catch-all term for various kinds of poetry composed 
after the time of Hesiod and Homer and down through the 5th 



century. This course will focus on the elegiacs of Theognis, a 
corpus of 1389 lines which divide into gnomic couplets and short 
poems of various sorts. The reading of this corpus will be the 
occasion for study of related stylistic and thematic points in other 
elegiac, iambic and melic poets. Lowell Edmunds 



Computer Science 



Program Description 

The Computer Science major is designed to be both intellectually 
demanding and practical. There are two components to the course 
requirements for the major: courses in computers and courses in 
mathematics. Courses satisfying the requirements are offered pri- 
marily by the Department of Mathematics (Mt) in the College of 
Arts and Sciences and the Computer Science Department (Mc) 
in the School of Management. 

Ten courses are required in the computer component: 

1. Mc 022 or Mt 060-061 (Introductory) 

2. Mc 350 or Mt 390 or Mt 460 (Structured Programming) 

3. Mc 406 or Mt 461 (Data Structures) 

4. Mc 452 or Mt 462 (Assembly Language) 

5. Mc 365 (Systems Analysis) 

6. Mt 463 (Algorithms: Design and Analysis) 

7. Mc 460 (Compilers) 

8. Mc 470 (Operating Systems) 

9. and 

10. Two electives from: 

Mc 400, Mc 404, Mc 455, Mc 456, Mc 480, 
Mq 604, Mq 605, Mq 606, Mt 414, Mt 435, 
Mt 436, Mt 860, Mt 861, Ge 572, Sc 512. 

The first four of these required courses on computers may be 
taken either from the Computer Science Department or from the 
Department of Mathematics. Students with a strong interest in 
mathematics or mathematical applications should take the courses 
offered by the Mathematics Department, as these courses have a 
more mathematical orientation. Where a choice is offered, only 
one of the courses may be taken for university credit. For example, 
a student may not take both Mc 406 and Mt 461 for credit because 
the courses greatly overlap. 

An entering student with computer programming experience, 
perhaps because of courses taken in high school, should speak 
to eitber the Chairman of the Computer Science Department or 
the Chairman of the Mathematics Department about placing out 
of the introductory course. In this case a student would be re- 
quired to take an additional computer elective before graduation. 

For Computer Science majors in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, the computer courses taken in the School of Management 
are included within the 32 courses that must be taken in A&S. 

The mathematics component of the course requirements for the 
computer science major is as follows: 

A. Mt 100-101 or Mt 102-103 or Mt 110 or Mt 112-113 or 
Mt 174-175 or Mt 184 (Calculus of one variable). 

B. Mt 200-201 or Mt 202-203 or Mt 212-213 or Mt 214 
(Multivariate Calculus) 

C. Mt 215 or Mt 216-217 or Mt 316-317 (Linear Algebra) 

D. Mt 420 or Mt 426-427 (Probability and Statistics) 

E. Mt 445 (Applied Combinatorics) 

Finally, it is strongly urged that a student majoring in Computer 
Science have a fundamental knowledge of physics, chemistry, 
and biology, perhaps from courses taken in high school or college. 

Students who hope to major in Computer Science should take 
one of the Calculus of one variable sequences (e.g., Mt 100-101) 
and an introductory programming course in their first year. (Mc 
022 normally is open to freshmen only in the spring semester.) 

Students majoring in Mathematics and hoping to double major 
in Computer Science should take Mt 102-103 (or Mt 112-113) 
and Mt 060-061 in their first year. Double majors may not use 
the same courses to fulfill both the ten-course computer com- 
ponent (listed 1-10 above) for the Computer Science major and 
the course requirements for the Mathematics major. However, 



Arts and Sciences / 29 

ECONOMICS 



mathematics courses taken to satisfy the Mathematics major re- 
quirements simultaneously satisfy the mathematics component 
of the Computer Science major (listed A-E above). 

Because of space constraints, only a limited number of students 
can be admitted to the Computer Science major. Students may 
apply to the major upon completion of a year of calculus and a 
B.C. computer course. This normally will occur at the end of the 
freshman year. Interested students should see either the Chairman 
of the Department of Mathematics or the Chairman of the Com- 
puter Science Department. 

The Computer Science major is administered jointly by the 
Department of Mathematics and by the Computer Science De- 
partment of the School of Management. 



Economics 

Faculty 

Professor James E. Anderson, A.B., Oberlin College; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin 

Professor David A. Belsley, A.B., Haverford College; Ph.D., Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology 

Professor Barry A. Bluestone, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Michigan 

Professor H. Michael Mann, A. B., Haverford College; Ph.D., Cornell 
University 

Professor Robert J. McEwen, S.J., A.B., Boston College; A.M., 
Fordham University; S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., Boston Col- 
lege 

Professor William B. Neenan, S.J., A.B., A.M., S.T.L., St. Louis 
University; Ph.D., University of Michigan; Dean, College of Arts 
and Sciences 

Professor Donald Richter, B.A., M.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology 

Professor Leon Smolinski, A.B., University of Freiburg, Germany; 
A.M., University of Cincinnati; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Professor Donald J. White, B.S., Boston College, A.M., Ph.D., Har- 
vard University; Dean, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 

Associate Professor John H. Ciccolo, Jr., A.B., University of Mary- 
land; A.M., Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor Andre Lucien Daniere, Baccalaureate, Lyons; 
M.S., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Frank M. Gollop, A.B., University of Santa 
Clara; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Marvin Kraus, B.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota 

Associate Professor Francis M. McLaughlin, B.S., A.M., Boston Col- 
lege; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor Harold A. Petersen, A.B., DePauw University; 
Ph.D., Brown University 

Associate Professor Joseph Quinn, A.B., Amherst College; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor Barbara Spencer, B.Ec, Australian National 
University; M.Ec, Monash University; Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon 
University 

Associate Professor Richard W. Tresch, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment 

A.B., Williams College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Assistant Professor Christopher F. Baum, A.B., Kalamazoo College; 
A.M., Florida Atlantic University; Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Assistant Professor Robert J. Cheney, S.J., A.B., A.M., Saint Louis 
University; S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Assistant Professor Scott Freeman, B.A., University of Wisconsin; 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota 



Assistant Professor Joe Peek, B.S., M.S., Oklahoma State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Assistant Professor Bruce D. Smith, B.S., University of Minnesota; 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Instructor Robert C. Steen, B.A., Kenyon College; M.A., Miami 
University; Ph.D. (cand.), Princeton University 



Program Description 

The major in Economics provides a critical examination of how 
the economic system works in the United States and throughout 
the world. The introductory course, Ec 131-132, is a survey of 
economic problems, policies, and theory; and required courses 
in micro theory and macro theory give a deeper analytical foun- 
dation. Electives permit further study in a wide range of fields, 
including money and banking, fiscal policy, international trade, 
economic development, economic history, capital theory and fi- 
nance, Soviet economics, comparative economic systems, labor 
economics, statistics, econometrics, industrial organization, con- 
sumer economics, and urban economics. A total of ten three- 
credit courses is required for the major, including Principles of 
Economics (Ec 131-132), Statistics (Ec 221, Ec 151, or Econo- 
metrics I, Ec 427), Microeconomic Theory (Ec 201 or 401), Mac- 
roeconomic Theory (Ec 202 or 402), and any five electives. 
Students who officially registered for the major on or before 12/ 
31/79 are not required to take Statistics, but they must satisfy the 
ten-course requirement for the major. 

Students from the School of Management may choose Econom- 
ics as an area of concentration. The concentration consists of 
seven courses, including Principles of Economics (Ec 131, 132), 
Microeconomic Theory (Ec 201 or 401), Macroeconomic Theory 
(Ec 202 or 402), Statistics (Ec 151, Ec 221 or Econometrics I, Ec 
427), and any two electives. Students with a serious interest in 
economics, however, are urged to take at least ten courses, the 
equivalent of an Arts and Sciences major. Finally, all School of 
Management students, regardless of their area of concentration, 
are required to take Principles of Economics (Ec 131—132) and 
Statistics (Ec 151 or Ec 221). 

A student choosing to do honors work in economics, whether 
in a college honors program or not, does independent research 
and writes an honors thesis under the guidance of an individual 
professor. The thesis proposal must be approved by the depart- 
ment Honors Committee and must be begun by the initiation of 
classes in the fall term of senior year. Honors students must also 
select the following courses: Honors Microeconomic Theory (Ec 
401), Honors Macroeconomic Theory (Ec 402), and three addi- 
tonal courses at the 400 level, e.g., the Departmental Seminars. 
One of these courses may be Econometrics II, (Ec 428). There is 
also a comprehensive examination at the end of the senior year. 

Honors is conferred by a vote of the Honors Committee at the 
end of the student's senior year. Students planning to do graduate 
work in economics should enter the honors program. Students 
with outstanding records are also encouraged to elect one or more 
graduate courses in their junior or senior years. 

Non-honors students with strong analytical ability are urged 
to fulfill their micro and macro theory requirements by taking Ec 
401 and Ec 402 rather than Ec 201 and Ec 202. Students with 
good mathematical backgrounds should take Ec 427 and Ec 428, 
Econometrics, rather than a single semester of Statistics. Students 
planning to do graduate work in economics should be sure to 
take Ec 711, Mathematics for Economists, or its equivalent in 
courses from the Mathematics Department. 

The major in Economics provides a general background which 
is useful to those planning careers in law, government service, 
or business as well as those planning careers as professional 
economists. Professional economists may take up positions as 
college teachers, as researchers for government agencies or busi- 
ness firms, as administrators or in management positions. 



Course Offerings 

Normally, students must take both Ec 131 and Ec 132 before 



30 / Arts and Sciences 

ECONOMICS 



taking any other Economics courses. Exceptions are Ec 151, Ec 
221, Ec 341—44 for which there are no prerequisites. Ec 131 and 
Ec 132 are offered in both semesters and may be taken in either 
order. They also satisfy the Social Sciences Core requirement. 

Students considering Principles should know the fundamentals 
of high school Algebra, especially the Algebra, and geometry, of 
a straight line. 

Ec 131 Principles of Economics I-Micro (F, S; 3) 

Analysis of prices, output, and income distribution through the 
interaction of households and business firms in a free-enterprise 
economy. Government intervention and alternative systems are 
examined, and basic analytical tools are applied to such current 
economic problems as pollution and congestion, the energy crisis, 
poverty and welfare, and race and sex discrimination. 

The Department 

Ec 132 Principles of Economics II-Macro (F, S; 3) 

Analysis of national income and employment, fluctuations in 
income, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, growth, and inter- 
national aspects of macroeconomic policy. Particular attention 
will be paid to problems of inflation and unemployment in the 
U.S. economy. The Department 

Ec 133 Microeconomics Module I (F; 3) 
Ec 134 Microeconomics Module II (S; 3) 

Microeconomics Modules I and II are designed as alternatives to 
Ec 131, Principles of Economics-Micro, and Ec 201 (or Ec 401), 
Microeconomic Theory. The Modules develop each topic in turn 
through the intermediate level, thus requiring one year to com- 
plete the normal set of micro topics. This approach avoids the 
duplication inherent in the usual sequence. Students may stop 
with Ec 133 and receive core credit as a substitute for Ec 131. 
The Modules are recommended for good students who are fairly 
certain they want to major in economics. Ec 134 receives honors 
theory credit. Andre Daniere 

Ec 135—136 Principles of Economics — French Immersion 
(F, 3; S, 3) 

Professor Daniere will offer Principles of Economics in French 
during 1982-83 as part of the Romance Language French Im- 
merson Program. These courses duplicate the standard Principles 
courses, Ec 131 and Ec 132, respectively. Interested students 
should contact Professor Daniere. Andre Daniere 

Ec 151 Statistics for Management (F, S; 3) 

Probability, random variables, sampling distributions, estimation 
of parameters, tests of hypotheses, regression and forecasting. 
Designed primarily to meet the School of Management Core re- 
quirement in statistics. The Department 

Ec 201 Microeconomic Theory (F, S; 3) 

This course develops a theoretical framework with which to 
analyze the two basic economic units, the consumer and the pro- 
ducer. This analysis is then employed to investigate the deter- 
mination of price and output in various market situations, 
implications for welfare and the construct of general economic 
equilibrium. The Department 

Ec 202 Macroeconomic Theory (F, S; 3) 

This course is intended to equip the student for the analysis of 
the determination of employment and of national income and its 
components. Emphasis will be placed on the Keynesian theory 
of employment, interest, and money and on post-Keynesian cycle 
and growth models. The Department 

Ec 221 Economic Statistics (F, S; 3) 

Probability, random variables, sampling distributions, estimation 
of parameters, tests of hypotheses, regression as applied to eco- 
nomic models. An introductory statistics course required for 
economic majors who registered for the major after 12/31/79. Stu- 
dents with good mathematics backgrounds should consider Ec 
427 as an alternative. Ec 221 satisfies the statistics requirement 
in the School of Management. The Department 

Ec 299 Independent Study (F, S; 3) 

The student works under the direction of an individual professor. 

The Department 

Ec 302 Topics in Macroeconomics (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ec 202 or Ec 402. 



A topics course stressing current controversies in macroeconomic 
policy including: the inflation-unemployment trade-off, supply 
side vs. demand side economics, and other issues based on stu- 
dent interest. Joe Peek 

Ec 340 Labor Economics (F, S; 3) 

This course will introduce students to the methodologies of labor 
economics and industrial relations, but the principal emphasis 
will be on labor economics as that branch of economic analysis 
that deals with such topics as the supply of and the demand for 
labor; the operation of labor markets; the extent and incidence 
of unemployment; and the determination of wages. Special at- 
tention will be paid to the process of collective bargaining, and 
to the impact of labor unions upon the operation of labor markets 
in the United States. Francis M. McLaughlin 

Ec 341 The Consumer Revolution in the World Economy (F; 3) 

The Consumer Revolution: the objective, methods, and effects of 
the consumer revolution. Selected areas and industries, e.g., au- 
tomobiles, credit, health care, food, representing special prob- 
lems. Robert /. McEwen, S.J. 

Not open to Junior or Senior majors. 

Ec 343 Consumer Information and Education (S; 3) 

The economic problem of inadequate consumer information and 
the sources and methods of improving consumer information. 
There are no prerequisites for this course. Not open to Junior or 
Senior majors. 

Ec 353 Industrial Organization-Competition and Antitrust (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ec 201 or Ec 203 or permission of the instructor 
An analysis of the relationship of market structure to the market 
conduct of business enterprises, and of each of these to market 
performance, will be made, with examples from specific indus- 
tries. The market performance that results from different types 
of structure and of conduct will be examined in the light of the 
objectives of public policy. H. Michael Mann 

Ec 354 Industrial Organization-Public Regulation (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ec 201 or Ec 401 or permission of the instructor 
Analysis of sources of market failure which encourage direct gov- 
ernmental intervention into market process. Specific areas ex- 
amined include occupational licensing, natural monopolies, and 
markets susceptible to destructive competition. Implications for 
public policy assessed. H. Michael Mann 

Frank M. Gollop 

Ec 357 Political Economics I (F; 3) 

An investigation of the distribution of economic and political 
power in America will be undertaken. The course begins with an 
inquiry into conservative, liberal, and radical economic perspec- 
tives, continues with an empirical study of social class and eco- 
nomic power, investigates corporate wealth and ownership, and 
finally concludes with a discussion of the role of the state under 
modern capitalism. Barry Bluestone 

Ec 358 Topics in Modern Political Economics (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ec 357 or permission of the instructor 
An in-depth political economic investigation of up to five of the 
following topics in political economics: foreign policy and im- 
perialism, poverty and labor markets, education, discrimination 
and racism, women's liberation and sexism, health care, the en- 
vironment, militarism, taxation, and the urban crisis. 

Barry Bluestone 

Ec 361 Monetary Theory and Policy (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ec 202 or 404, or permission of instructor 
An analysis of the nature of money and other financial instru- 
ments; banks and other financial intermediaries; and central 
banking in the United States economy. With this background, 
alternative views of money and economic activity are presented, 
and the theory and practice of economic stabilization policy are 
discussed. Relevant topics in international finance are also 
introduced. Christopher F. Baum 

John H. Ciccolo 
Scott Freeman 

Ec 366 Public Finance (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ec 201 or Ec 401 or concurrent; or permission 



Arts and Sciences / 31 

ENGLISH 



An analysis of the micro-economic problems of the public sector 
in a market economy including: the proper scope of the public 
sector; decision rules for government expenditures; practical 
problems of cost-benefit analysis; criteria for a "good" tax system: 
special problems of state and local governments. The course 
stresses current U.S. problems William Neenan, S.J. 

Robert C. Steen 
Richard W. Tresch 

Ec 369 Program Planning and Evaluation (S; 3) 

Discussion of the various methods used to plan and evaluate 
government programs, with applications taken from recent ex- 
perience. Cost-benefit analysis receives special emphasis. 

Andre Daniere 

Ec 371 International Trade (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ec 201 or Ec 401 or permission of the instructor 
An analysis of the foundations of trade and the principle of com- 
parative advantage, leading to a sophisticated study of protec- 
tionism. Current U.S. protectionist issues will be illuminated. 
Also, economic warfare, control of international factor move- 
ments, and interaction of trade and economic development. 

The Department 

Ec 372 International Finance (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ec 202 or Ec 402 or permission of instructor. 
Monetary aspects of international trade and balance of payments 
models will be studied under alternative exchange rate regimes. 
Particular emphasis will be placed upon the effects and role of 
monetary and fiscal policies as they relate to balance of payments 
questions. The Department 

Ec 375 Economic Development (S; 3) 

This course considers the economic characteristics of the less 
developed countries, the theories offered as explanations of the 
sources of development and the principal issues facing policy 
makers in these countries. Francis M. McLaughlin 

Ec 380 Capital Theory and Finance (F; S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ec 201 or Ec 401 and Ec 221 or Ec 427 or with 

permission 

Valuation of assets, rates of return, measurement of earnings, 

finance and securities markets, risk and portfolio choice, and 

special problems in investment such as human capital, the public 

sector, and tax incentives to investment. Harold Petersen 

Ec 394 Urban Economics (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ec 201 or Ec 401. 

This course deals with problems facing large U.S. cities-declining 
incomes and population, substandard housing, congested high- 
ways and public transit, rising public expenditures and deteri- 
oration of public services. The determinants of land-use-physical, 
economic and political-are identified and various public policies 
such as urban renewal, local finance, transportation subsidies, 
are evaluated. Robert C. Steen 

Ec 397 Soviet Economic System (F; 3) 

Analysis of factors determining the rate of growth of the Soviet 
economy and of methods used by Soviet planners in mobilizing 
resources and in their allocation. Special attention is given to 
recent reforms of managerial incentives and to the operational 
efficiency of the Soviet economy. Leon SmoJinski 

Ec 398 Comparative Economic Systems (S; 3) 

The main purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with 
the operational principles of noncapitalist economic systems 
such as democratic socialism, Soviet type economies, and Yu- 
goslav market socialism. Special attention is given to the theory 
and practice of economic planning and to the ways in which 
various economic systems attempt to achieve rapid growth, ef- 
ficient resource allocation, and social welfare. Leon Smolinski 

Ec 401 Microeconomic Theory Honors Level (F; 3) 

A more intensive analytical treatment of the same material pre- 
sented in Ec 201. Some mathematical tools will be developed as 
needed. Open to anyone who has done well in Principles of 
Economics and highly recommended for students interested in 
doing graduate work in economics. Marvin C. Kraus 



Ec 402 Macroeconomic Theory Honors Level (S; 3) 

A more intensive analytical treatment of the same material pre- 
sented in Ec 202. Some mathematical tools will be developed as 
needed. Open to anyone who has done well in Principles of 
Economics and highly recommended for students interested in 
doing graduate work in economics. Donald Richter 

Ec 427 Econometrics I: Probability and Statistics (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Calculus 

This course presents the statistical background required as an 
introduction to the study of econometrics; probability, sampling 
distributions, statistical problems of point and interval estimation 
and hypothesis testing. Harold Petersen 

Ec 428 Econometrics II (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Calculus, and Ec 427 or its equivalent 
This course focuses on parameter estimation and hypothesis test- 
ing in linear economic relationships. Topics covered include sim- 
ple and multiple regression, multicollinearity, heteroskedasticity, 
serial correlation, specification errors, errors in variables, and an 
introduction to simultaneous equation estimation. 

Joseph Quinn 

Ec 403-497 Departmental Seminar Series (F, S; 3) 

Each semester the Department will offer up to five small seminar 
style courses in economic theory or policy, limited to 15 to 20 
students each. The seminars are intended to create possibilities 
for student-student and student-faculty interaction that do not 
exist in the larger Ec 300 electives. The seminar series is part of 
the Honors program in that an Honors candidate must choose at 
least three seminars as three of his/her ten courses, but the sem- 
inars are open to non-Honors students as well. Any major with 
a solid record in Principles and the Theory courses is encouraged 
to participate. The Department 

Ec 498 Senior Honors Thesis (S; 3) 

Required of all Seniors seeking a degree with Honors in Econom- 
ics. The Department 



English 

Faculty 



Professor Leonard R. Casper, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University of Wis- 
consin 

Philomatheia Professor P. Albert Duhamel, A.B., College of the Holy 
Cross; A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Professor Anne D. Ferry, A.B., Vassar College; A.M., Ph.D., Co- 
lumbia University 

Professor Richard E. Hughes, A.B., Siena College; A.M., Boston 
College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Professor John L. Mahoney, A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

Professor John J. McAleer, A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Har- 
vard University 

Professor E. Dennis Taylor, A.B., College of the Holy Cross; A.M., 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Professor Judith Wilt, A.B., Duquesne University; Ph.D., Indiana 
University 

Associate Professor Joseph A. Appleyard, S.J., Chairman of the 

Department 

A.B., Boston College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Henry A. Blackwell, A.B., Morgan State Col- 
lege; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Associate Professor Rosemarie Bodenheimer, A.B., Radcliffe Col- 
lege; Ed.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., Boston College 

Associate Professor Adele M. Dalsimer, A.B., Mt. Holyoke College; 
M.S.-, Hunter College; Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor Paul C. Doherty, A.B., College of the Holy 
Cross; A.M., Boston University; Ph.D., University of Missouri 



32 / Arts and Sciences 

ENGLISH 



Associate Professor John J. Fitzgerald, A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Associate Professor Robert Kern, A.B., City College of New York; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Joseph A. Longo, B.S., M.Ed., A.M., Ph.D., Rut- 
gers University 

Associate Professor Robin R. Lydenberg, A.B., Barnard College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Associate Professor John F. McCarthy, A.B., Harvard University; 
A.M., Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor Daniel L. McCue, Jr., A.B., Boston College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Associate Professor Kristin Morrison, A.B., Immaculate Heart Col- 
lege; A.M., St. Louis University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor John H. Randall, III, A.B., Columbia Univer- 
sity; A.M., University of California at Berkeley; Ph.D., University 
of Minnesota 

Associate Professor Charles L. Regan, A.B., Boston College; A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Robert E. Reiter, A.B., St. Bonaventure College; 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Associate Professor Richard J. Schrader, A.B., Notre Dame Uni- 
versity; A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Associate Professor Cecil F. Tate, A.B., University of Maryland; 
A.M., Ph.D., Emory University 

Associate Professor Andrew J. Von Hendy, A.B., Niagara Univer- 
sity; A.M., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Associate Professor William Youngren, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

University 

Assistant Professor Raymond G. Biggar, A.B., Bowdoin College; 
M.A.T., Harvard University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Assistant Professor Howard A. Eiland, A.B., Northwestern Uni- 
versity; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Assistant Professor Dayton Haskin, A.B., University of Detroit; 
A.M., Northwestern University; B.D., University of London; 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Assistant Professor Paul Lewis, A.B., City College of New York; 
A.M., University of Manitoba; Ph.D., University of New Hamp- 
shire 

Assistant Professor Joseph M. McCafferty, A.B., A.M., Boston Col- 
lege 

Assistant Professor Francis J. McDermott, A.B., A.M., Boston Col- 
lege; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor John J. Sullivan, Assistant Chairman of the 

Department 

A.B., Harvard University; A.M., Boston College 

Assistant Professor Francis W. Sweeney, S.J., A.B., College of the 
Holy Cross; Ph.L., Weston College; A.M., Boston College 

Assistant Professor Christopher P. Wilson, A.B., Princeton Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Yale University 

Lecturer Sr. Elizabeth S. White, R.S.C.J., A.B., Manhattanville Col- 
lege; A.M., Radcliffe College; Ph.D., Catholic University 



Program Description 

In an academic milieu fragmented into departments and spec- 
ialized disciplines, the study of literature is one of the few re- 
maining elements of the old liberal education which still offers 
students a point of view from which they can integrate the di- 
versity of their own experience. Language is the mirror of the 
human mind and literature the record of its preoccupations — 
intellectual, aesthetic, psychological, political and social, histor- 
ical, moral and religious. The study of literature is thus a school- 
ing in human experience, and its primary use is for the development 



of those who study it. It is also, of course, good training for any 
field in which understanding of behavior is valued. And the tools 
used, because they deal with language and the forms of expres- 
sion, have applicability in any kind of work where precise and 
effective communication is important. English majors can de- 
velop these skills to a considerable degree while undergraduates, 
and non-majors will find that taking even a few well-chosen 
courses beyond the Core requirement can widen their knowledge 
of literature and sharpen their linguistic abilities. 

Requirements for a Major 

1. Students normally begin an English major in their sopho- 
more year, after having had two semesters of the core course or 
its equivalent. They must take ten courses from among the de- 
partment's offerings, in addition to the two core courses, for a 
total of twelve courses. As a first step students are required to 
take two introductory courses, in sequence: En 201: Studies in 
Poetry and then En 202: Practice of Criticism. Both courses train 
students intensively in the close reading of literary texts and in 
writing with critical awareness about literature. Other courses 
may be useful at this point to fill in students' knowledge of the 
background out of which English literature developed. A rec- 
ommended course is En 110: Classical and Biblical Backgrounds 
of English Literature. 

2. As a second step students are required to take at least two 
courses in the history of English and American literature. (If a 
student's program allows it these may be taken simultaneously 
or in overlap with En 201 and 202). Only certain specific courses 
satisfy this requirement: the two parts of En 210—211: Survey of 
English Literature I &■ II, and the four English Literary History 
courses (En 221, 222, 223, 224). En 401: Major American Writers 
I also satisfies this requirement, and is especially recommended 
at this point for students who have a special interest in American 
literature and intend to study it further. Students may satisfy this 
historical requirement by mixing these courses in any combina- 
tion, so long as they take at least one course from the first of these 
two blocks: 



Block I 

Survey I 

ELH I: Chaucer to Spenser 

ELH II: Donne to Dryden 



Block II 

Survey II 

ELH III: Pope to Keats 
ELH IV: Tennyson to Eliot 
Major American Writers I 



Students who have a special interest in American literature are 
advised to take Major American Writers I at this point, as a foun- 
dation for later courses. 

After these two steps, students should be in a position to begin 
making their own choices about how they will complete the major 
requirements. They will have a great many options from among 
the thirty or so electives the department offers each semester in 
English and American literature, in Irish studies, in writing, in 
the different genres, and in particular themes. By senior year 
students ought to be able to focus on some well-defined topics 
(individual authors, important single works, specialized themes). 
Seniors should also consider courses in literary criticism and 
theory, which provide an integrating point of view towards their 
experience of studying literature. Each year the department will 
offer some of these senior-level courses as Senior Seminars, lim- 
ited in enrollment and restricted to seniors, to enable them to 
work closely with a faculty member on a topic of special interest. 

As in the past, students may also fulfill the major requirements 
by an alternate method. With the aid of an advisor and the ap- 
proval of a departmental committee, they may design an indi- 
vidualized sequence of courses which suits their own special 
interests. This plan is particularly appropriate for students in- 
terested in interdisciplinary work — for example, in American 
Studies. Students who satisfy their major requirements this way 
may count for English credit up to two courses taken in other 
departments. 

Students who are seniors in the Fall of 1982 may satisfy either 
the old or present requirements for majoring in English. The old 
(pre-1981) requirements consist of a total of eight courses beyond 
the two Core courses. Five of these have to be distributed among 
the various periods and genres in the following way: one course 
in medieval language or literature, one other course in pre-1900 



Arts and Sciences / 33 

ENGLISH 



literature, one course in criticism, one course in poetry, and one 
course in another genre. 

English Courses for Non-Majors 

Students majoring in other subjects have always been welcome 
in English courses, for the diversity of viewpoint and variety of 
knowledge they often bring with them. From the students' point 
of view, English courses offer the enjoyment of reading good 
literature; insight into history, culture, and human character; and 
a chance to polish skills of reading and writing. Students who 
are not English majors, however, should consider the degree of 
difficulty of particular courses and the preparation other students 
are likely to have. Course descriptions, particularly the more de- 
tailed ones which the department distributes in advance of each 
registration period, are useful sources of this kind of information. 

Irish Studies Program 

Irish Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to the culture 
and society of Ireland. Individual courses cover the areas of social, 
political, and economic history, literature, medieval art, sociol- 
ogy, and the Irish language. In addition, there are several courses 
that are jointly taught by faculty from various disciplines. These 
include: a three-semester sequence of courses integrating the his- 
tory and literature of Ireland, from the eighteenth to the twentieth 
centuries, a study tour of Ireland, a one-semester course culmi- 
nating in three weeks of field study in Ireland. 

Irish studies offers a junior-year Irish Studies Program at Uni- 
versity College, Cork, which provides intensive exposure in areas 
of Irish culture not normally available in the United States, such 
as Irish ethnography, folklore, and anthropology. Interested 
students should apply to the Junior Year Abroad Office or see 
Professors Dalsimer and O'Neill of the English and History De- 
partments. 

Students interested in studying the Irish language should con- 
sult the Evening College Catalogue. 

Minor in Secondary Education 

Students in the College of Arts & Sciences majoring in English 
may apply to minor in Education, in order to gain certification 
for teaching. The program begins in the Junior Year. Interested 
students should contact the Coordinator of Secondary Education 
or the Associate Dean in the School of Education during the first 
semester in sophomore year. They should also consult the English 
Department's advisor for students in this program, John J. Fitz- 
gerald, Carney 451. 

University of Nijmegen Student Exchange 

The English Departments of Boston College and the University 
of Nijmegen in the Netherlands exchange one student each year. 
Usually a junior English major goes to Nijmegen, and a graduate 
student comes here. Tuition is waived for both students. Nijme- 
gen is a city of some 150,000 inhabitants located on the Rhine 
near the German border, and the university has 16,000 students, 
about 350-400 in the English Department. The Boston College 
student may attend both undergraduate and graduate courses. All 
teaching in the department is done in English, and outside the 
English Department faculty and students usually have a fair 
knowledge of English. Interested students should apply to the 
Chairman of the English Department by late February. 

Student Advisors 

Advising Program 

Director 
Advanced Placement 
BA/MA Program 
Secondary Education 

Minor 
Graduate Study in 

English 
American Studies 



Irish Studies 
Medieval Studies 



Margaret Dever, Carney 448 

Judith Wilt, Carney 443 
Chairman, Carney 450 
John Fitzgerald, Carney 451 

John Mahoney, Carney 462 

Christopher Wilson, Hovey 

House, Carney 438 
Adele Dalsimer, Carney 439 
Joseph Longo, Carney 452 



Course Offerings 

NOTE: The numbering system for English courses was changed and 



expanded in the 1981-82 Bulletin. Some numbers in the new system 
may designate courses which had different numbers before 1981-82. 

En 021-022 Critical Reading and Writing (F, S; 3, 3) 

A two-semester course designed to train students in the reading, 
analysis, and understanding of literature and in the writing of 
expository and persuasive prose. The literature includes signif- 
icant works of drama, prose fiction, essay, and poetry. Regular 
writing assignments, carefully examined and discussed, are an 
important part of the course. En 021-022 fulfills the Core re- 
quirement in English. The Department 

En 041-042 English for Foreign Students: Intermediate 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is designed to enable Boston College students and 
personnel whose native language is not English to acquire the 
fluency and skill in English — speaking, listening, writing and 
reading — necessary to function satisfactorily — academically and 
socially — in the Boston College community. 

It is intended for Intermediate students only, NOT for beginning 
students. 

A total of ten hours of English a week is available: four hours 
of class, four hours of language laboratory, and two hours per 
week of free tutoring by Boston College students. Extra writing 
assignments are expected of those who do not attend the language 
laboratory. 

During the Fall semester, the emphasis is on speaking and lis- 
tening with understanding, accompanied by writing assignments 
and the reading of short stories. The sounds and structures of 
English are examined. The second semester is a continuation of 
the first, with a quick grammatical review, and with greater con- 
cern for reading short stories and a novel, and for expository 
writing. 

This course is graded P (pass], F (fail), or J (continue). A P 
signifies the student's readiness to take En 021—022 or En 
043-044 (with the advice of the instructor); a J indicates that the 
student should continue in En 041-042; an F indicates failure. 
En 041-042 is a credit course for undergraduates; but it does 
NOT fulfill the Core requirement in English. It is a non-credit 
course for graduate students, staff, faculty spouses, etc., who re- 
ceive a grade of S (satisfactory). 

Open to off -campus students (see the Professor; do NOT register 
in the Evening School). Free to all Boston College students and 
personnel. The Department 

En 043-044 English for Foreign Students: Advanced (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is designed to fulfill the Core requirement in English 
for students whose native language is not English. It is NOT in- 
tended for foreign students whose competence in English is very 
close to that of native students. Such students should enroll in 
En 021-022. 

In addition to the four hours of class, free tutoring by Boston 
College students and use of the language laboratory are available. 
Grammar, pronunciation, the structure of the English sentence 
and expository writing are discussed both semesters. The liter- 
ature read critically will include the short story and novel the 
first semester, and drama and poetry the second. 

Undergraduate students in En 043-044 receive credit for two 
Core requirements in English upon satisfactorily completing both 
semesters. The first semester is graded P (pass), J (continue), or 
F (failure). A P signifies the student's readiness to take En 021 
or 022; a J indicates that the student should continue in En 044; 
an F indicates failure. The second semester is graded by the 
University's standard letter grades. 

En 043—044 is a non-credit course for graduate students, staff, 
faculty, faculty spouses, etc., who receive a grade of S (satisfac- 
tory). Open to off-campus students (see the Professor; do NOT 
register in the Evening School). Free to all Boston College students 
and personnel. The Department 

Un 105 Perspectives on Modernism (F, S; 6, 6) 

A full-term course in the literature, music, and visual arts usually 
connected with the term "modernism." The first eight weeks of 
the term will be devoted to literature, the last five of the first term 
and the first five of the second to music, and the last eight of the 
second term to the visual arts. Among authors read during the 
literature segment will be Baudelaire, Dostoevsky, Ibsen, Eliot, 
Kafka, and Joyce. The composers listened to during the music 



34 / Arts and Sciences 

ENGLISH 



segment will include Wagner, Debussy, and Stravinsky; there will 
also be at least one week on jazz. The visual arts segment will 
emphasize not only painting but also sculpture and architecture. 
Classes will mainly be conducted in open discussion rather than 
as lectures. Howard Eiland 

Andrew von Hendy 
William Youngren 

En 110.01 Classical and Biblical Backgrounds of English 
Literature (F; 3) 

A course designed to acquaint students with the classical and 
biblical tests which form the background of so much English 
literature — Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Vergil's Aeneid, the 
Greek dramas, and some of the principal books of the 
Bible. Howard Eiland 

Dayton Haskin 

En 201 Studies in Poetry (F, S; 3) 

Close reading of poetry, developing the student's ability to ask 
questions which open poems to analysis, and to write lucid in- 
terpretative papers. Rosemarie Bodenheimer 

AdeJe Dalsimer 

Howard Eiland 

Anne Ferry 

John Fitzgerald 

Robert Kern 

Robin Lydenberg 

John McCarthy 

Andrew von Hendy 

Judith Wilt 

En 202 Practice of Criticism (F, S; 3) 

Further close reading of texts — including longer poems, prose 
fiction, and drama — and practice in writing critically about them. 

Henry Blackwell 

Rosemarie Bodenheimer 

Paul C. Doherty 

Robert Kern 

Daniel McCue 

Robert Reiter 

Dennis Taylor 

Elizabeth White 

Judith Wilt 

William Youngren 

En 210 Survey of English Literature I (F; 3) 

The major authors of literature in English up to 1700. 

Richard Hughes 

En 211 Survey of English Literature II (S; 3) 

The major authors of literature in English from 1700 to the present 
century. Elizabeth White, R.S.C.J. 

English Literary History 

These courses cover major writers in different genres, and aim 
at giving students a sense of the issues and idioms and of the 
changes and continuities across the periods covered. 



En 221 ELH I: Chaucer to Spenser (F; 3) 

En 222 ELH II: Donne to Dryden (S; 3) 

En 223 ELH III: Pope to Keats (F; 3) 

En 224 ELH IV: Tennyson to Eliot (S; 3) 



Raymond Biggar 

Robert Reiter 

Daniel McCue 

John McCarthy 



En 315 Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales (S; 3) 

A close reading of the Tales, with discussion of the relevant four- 
teenth-century background. Raymond Biggar 

En 317 Chaucer (F; 3) 

A close reading of Chaucer's poetry, including The Canterbury 
Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, with discussion of the relevant 
14th century background. Richard Schroder 

En 320 Modern Arthurian Literature (S; 3) 

This course will survey a number of post-medieval works con- 
nected with the "Matter of Britain," the stories of King Arthur 
and his knights. The authors include Malory, Tennyson, Twain, 



Edwin Arlington Robinson, T. H. White, Charles Williams, C. S. 
Lewis, and Mary Stewart. Richard Schroder 

En 326 Shakespeare I (F; 3) 

A study of the Histories and Comedies, with detailed analysis of 
the texts of Richard II, I Henry IV, Romeo and Juliet and Twelfth 
Night. p. Albert Duhamel 

En 327 Shakespeare II (S; 3) 

A study of the Tragedies and Romances, with detailed analysis 
of the texts of Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra 
and The Tempest. P. Albert Duhamel 

En 328 Shakespeare I: The Major Genre (F; 3) 

A study of selected comedies from the canon. The course will 
trace the development of Shakespeare and Renaissance theories 
of love (esp. Plato, Christian ideals, and courtly love) and of 
history. The approach will be through an awareness of Shake- 
speare as 'philosopher' (the history of ideas) and 'dramatist' (Ren- 
aissance theatrical conventions). The plays selected for intensive 
analysis are Love's Labour's Lost, A Midsummer Night's Dream, 
The Tempest, Richard II, and the first part of Henry IV. 

Joseph Longo 

En 329 Shakespeare II: The Major Tragedies (S; 3) 

A study of the canon from 1600-1610. The focus will be Shake- 
speare's examination of tragedy — its protagonist, experience, 
ideas, etc. — and the probability of its resolution. The approach 
will be through an awareness of Shakespeare as 'philosopher' 
(the history of ideas) and 'dramatist' (Renaissance theatrical con- 
ventions). The plays selected for close analysis will be Hamlet, 
Troilus and Cressida, Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. 
The course is designed to offer the student of Shakespeare an 
introduction to the man and his milieu, with primary emphasis 
given to the plays rather than the general background. 

Joseph Longo 

En 331 Courtly Love Tradition (F; 3) 

A historical survey of English and continental love literature from 
Andreas Capellanus to Chaucer. The course will attempt to assess 
the significance of the tradition and to apply its chief characteris- 
tics to a reading of Chaucer's Troilus. Joseph Longo 

En 351 English Romanticism (S; 3) 

The development of Romanticism in nineteenth-century England. 
The course will focus on the major poetry and literary theory of 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Keats. There will also be consider- 
ation of important historical and philosophical backgrounds. 

John Mahoney 

En 361 (Hs 425) The Victorian World (F; 3) 

By combining readings in history and Victorian novels, this 
course aims at building a picture of the dramatic changes in social 
organization and attitude that accompanied the process of ur- 
banization and industrialization in 19th century England. We will 
focus especially on the complex and changing mixture of stresses 
that defined Victorian attitudes to social class, poverty, work, and 
the relations between men and women, comparing our own un- 
derstanding of these changes with the Victorians' visions of them. 
Readings will include social history and novels by Austen, 
Bronte, Dickens, Gaskell and Trollope. 

Rosemarie Bodenheimer 
Peter Weiler 

En 362 19th Century British Fiction (S; 3) 

Detailed work on novels by Austen, Dickens, Gaskell, Eliot, and 
Hardy, with emphasis on the novelists' ways of setting family life 
and generational conflict in relation to the world of enterprise 
and social change. Mostly discussion, with some short historical 
lectures. Rosemarie Bodenheimer 

En 364 1850's (F; 3) 

The 1850's was the golden decade of Victorian literature. Once 
the great Victorian literary forms had been established in the 
1840's they now began to flourish. Arnold, Browning, Elizabeth 
Barrett Browning, Tennyson, Clough, Dickens, Mill, Ruskin, Dar- 
win, Gaskell, Trollope, Meredith, and others (even Wordsworth) 
published what were arguably their greatest works in this decade. 
This course will choose four of the novels, probably Dickens' 



Arts and Sciences / 35 

ENGLISH 



Bleak House, Trollope's Barchester Towers, Bronte's ViJJette, 
Meredith's The Ordea] of Richard Feverel, study their relation- 
ships and place them in the context of the period's great poems 
and great essays. Dennis Taylor 

En 375 D. H. Lawrence: Novels (S; 3) 

A study of Sons and Lovers, The Bainbow, Women in Love, 
Aaron's Bod, The Plumed Serpent, Lady Chatterley's Lover, and 
several of the short novels. Bichard Hughes 

En 377 Modern Drama I (F; 3) 

A study of three important twentieth-century playwrights — Sean 
O'Casey. Arthur Miller and Tom Stoppard — whose work is rep- 
resentative of various ways that modern playwrights deal with 
social questions. Kristin Morrison 

En 381 Bronte, Eliot, Woolf (F; 3) 

This course will examine the autobiographical, ethical, and aes- 
thetic impulses of three major English novelists, Charlotte Bronte, 
George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf. We will examine, compare, and 
contrast narrative voice, perspective, and intention with the 
world and characters each novelists creates. A major concern of 
the course will be to trace the emergence of a female conscious- 
ness and a feminist aesthetic. Eileen Barrett 

En 382 Senior Seminar: Hopkins (F; 3) 

Gerard Manley Hopkins was a poet uniquely Victorian and 
uniquely modern at the same time. The course will first consider 
those contemporary writers who had most impact in shaping 
Hopkins' attitudes — chiefly Newman, Carlyle, Ruskin, Pater, and 
the Pre-Raphaelites — before undertaking a thorough exploration 
of his own poetry and prose. John McCarthy 

En 383 Dickinson and Woolf (S; 3) 

This course is designed as a study of the lives and work of a great 
19th century American poet and a great 20th century English 
novelist not only to compare and contrast Emily Dickinson and 
Virginia Woolf but also to raise several general literary questions 
about women artists and poetic and social identity, about lyrics 
vs. narrative impulses in art, and about the writers' choice of an 
"outsiders" stance. Judith Wilt 

En 384 The Long Poem in the 20th Century (S; 3) 

The course will consider the possibilities available to the writer 
of a long poem inthe 20th Century. In an age that has largely 
abandoned traditional poetic forms, how does the poet structure 
a long poem? In an age that lacks a communal myth, how does 
the poet find a subject matter? We will discuss the problems of 
form and content in the following poems: T. S. Eliot's The Waste 
Land and Four Quartets, Ezra Pound: "Hugh Selwyn Mauberley," 
Wallace Stevens: "Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction," William 
Carlos Williams: Paterson, Allen Ginsberg: "Howl," Geoffrey Hill: 
Mercian Hymns. We will also briefly examine the method of 
poems such as Pound's Cantos, David Jones' Anathemata, and 
Charles Olson's Maximum Poems. Michael Leddy 

En 401.01 Major American Writers I (F; 3) 

An introduction to American literature from 1620 to 1860. Brad- 
street, Taylor, Franklin, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Mel- 
ville, and Whitman. Paul Lewis 

En 401.02; 03 Major American Writers I (F; 3) 

A study of the American literary tradition as it developed in the 
19th century. Readings in the major Transcendentalists (Emerson, 
Thoreau), poets (Whitman, Dickson), writers of romantic fiction 
(Poe, Hawthorne, Melville), realistic writers (Twain, James). 

John H. BandalJ, HI 

En 402.04 Major American Writers II (S; 3) 

Four major writers of "The American Renaissance," Hawthorne, 
Melville, Thoreau and Whitman. Cecil Tate 

En 402.02; 03 Major American Writers II (S; 3) 

Readings in authors of the twentieth century. 

John H. Randall, III 



En 402.05 Major American Writers II (S; 3) 

Readings in American literature of the twentieth century, focus- 
ing on the work of Robinson, Frost, Eliot, Dreiser, Hemingway, 
Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and Bellow. Henry Blackwell 

En 411 American Fiction 1860-1914 (F; 3) 

A study of selected masterpieces of fiction of the late nineteenth 
and early twentieth century, with emphasis upon the intellectual 
and cultural contexts of the writers, their place in American lit- 
erary history, and their dialogues about fiction and the values of 
their time. Twain, Howells, James, Crane, Dreiser, Gertrude Stein 
and Edith Wharton will receive major attention. Writers such as 
Horatio Alger, Bret Harte, G. W. Cable, Sarah Jewett, Ambrose 
Bierce, Frank Norris, Kate Chopin, Paul Dunbar, Charles Chest- 
nut, J. W. Johnson, Jack London, Upton Sinclair, and Willa Cather 
will receive brief mention. Henry Blackwell 

En 418-419 (Bk 106) African-American Literature I & II 
F, S; 3. 3) 

A survey of black American writing from the oral beginnings to 
the Harlem Renaissance' major authors, subject, style and theme. 
Including poetry, prose, fiction and drama. Patricia Brown 

En 420 Senior Seminar: Hawthorne and Melville (F; 3) 

An exploration of the romances and short stories of Nathaniel 
Hawthorne and Herman Melville. Works studied will include 
The Scarlet Letter, The House of the Seven Gables, The Blithedale 
Bomance, Typee, White-Jacket, Moby-Dick, Pierre, and The Con- 
fidence Man. Students should bring to the course some knowl- 
edge of early American literature and culture. Paul Lewis 

En 430 Senior Seminar: 19th Century American Poetry (S; 3) 

A study of Emerson as the founder of a distinctively American 
poetics, of his chief followers, Whitman and Dickinson, and of 
Poe as his dark antagonist. fiobert Kern 

En 450 Fitzgerald and Hemingway (S; 3) 

A chronological survey of the works of F. Scott Fitzgerald and 
Ernest Hemingway, studying both the man and the myth to show 
how each was victimized by the myth in different ways. 

John H. Bandall III 

En 451 Senior Seminar: Society and Literature of the Thirties 
(F;3) 

A study of the social, political, and economic ideas embodied in 
selected works of Nathanael West, John Dos Passos, Clifford 
Odets, John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, 
Thomas Wolfe, Richard Wright, in an attempt to discover whether 
social relevance and aesthetic worth are necessarily incompatible. 

John H. Randall III 

En 452 Southern Renascence in American Literature (S; 3) 

A study of selected major works of American writers of the South. 
Among those to be read will be William Faulkner, Carson Mc- 
Cullers, and Flannery O'Connor. Cecil Tate 

En 472 Contemporary American Fiction (S; 3) 

The neoconventions of Fabulism: in Pynchon, Gardner, Hawkes, 
Joyce Carol Oates, Ishmael Reed, and Tom Robbins. 

Leonard Casper 

En 492 American Business Novel (F; 3) 

This course examines the business novel as a sub-genre of realistic 
fiction in America during the last century. The course will be 
historical in that it will explore changing cultural attitudes to- 
wards business life during the last 100 year; our emphasis, how- 
ever, will fall on the primary concerns of these novels — marriage, 
sex roles, status, and the "presentation of self in everyday life." 
In addition, we will try to determine whether particular literary 
modes — linear narrative, satire, epic — are especially appropriate 
to representing business life at specific moments in 
history. Christopher Wilson 

En 496 Two Black American Writers (F; 3) 

This course is an in-depth analysis of selected works by Richard 
Wright and Amiri Baraka, two famous, prolific, highly influential, 
twentieth-century black American writers. The course will ex- 
amine contexts, themes, and artistry of their major work and 
glance at their debts and their contributions to the mainstream 
of American Literature. Henry Blackwell 



36 / Arts and Sciences 

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En 497 Social and Political Aspects of Literature (S; 3) 

This course concerns itself with the social and political dimen- 
sion of 20th century literature. Topics covered will include the 
modern literary profession, the role of literary "elites" in political 
discourse, "proletarian" literature, and the modern political 
novel. Course readings will focus intensively on 4 or 5 writers 
who have been both theorists and practioners of political litera- 
ture since 1900. Christopher Wilson 

En 500 (Hs 417) Politics and Literature of Irish Independence 
1845-1922 (F; 3) 

This course will examine the interaction of politics and literature 
during the crucial stages of the movement for Irish Independence. 
It will pay particular attention to the development of political 
and literary attitudes and the relationships between such atti- 
tudes and objective historical reality. It will draw upon literary 
and historical readings and lectures in an attempt to integrate the 
two disciplines and achieve a more sophisticated understanding 
of Irish culture. 

This course is taught jointly and cross-registered with the His- 
tory Department. Kevin O'Neill 

Adele Dalsimer 

En 522 Short Fiction of the 19th and 20th Centuries (S; 3) 

The novellas and short stories studied will investigate the char- 
acteristic themes and techniques of representative literary fig- 
ures — of Americans like Hawthorne, Melville, James, Faulkner, 
Porter, and O'Connor — of Europeans like Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tol- 
stoi, Mann, Joyce, and D. H. Lawrence. Joseph McCafferty 

En 523 Information Processing (S; 3) 

Methods of storing, retrieving, and disseminating information in 
our culture from the Middle Ages to the present: manuscripts, 
printed books, libraries, photocopying, electronic tape recording, 
computerized word processing. Daniel McCue 

En 524 The World of Children's Literature I (F; 3) 

An examination of significant creativity, including illustration, 
produced in over two centuries — with a double appeal to the 
young and adult audience. Writers include Perrault, the Brothers 
Grimm, Andersen, Ruskin, Dickens, Carroll, Stevenson, Twain, 
Wilde, Baum, Barrie, Grahame, Milne, E. B. White, C. S. Lewis, 
Thurber, Wilder. Francis McDermott 

En 525 World of Children's Literature II (S; 3) 

Part I is not a prerequisite. Further emphases and new material. 
Attention will be given to more award winners, to picture books, 
the fairy, folk and tall tale, children's verse, teenage fiction, classic 
texts. Examined will be Lear, MacDonald, Collodi, Alcott, Salten, 
Tolkein, Forbes, Lofting, Singer, Jarrell, Lawson, Dahl, Blume — 
and others. Francis McDermott 

En 527 (SI 311) General Linguistics (F; 3) 

An introduction to the history and techniques of the scientific 
study of language in its structures and operations: articulatory 
and acoustic phonology, morphological analysis, historical re- 
construction, and syntactic models. 
Offered annually Michael J. Connolly 

En 530 Tragedy in Drama and Fiction (F; 3) 

This course will look at the "genius of tragedy"; the independent, 
sometimes radical vision of some Elizabethan dramatists includ- 
ing Shakespeare and of some American and Russian novelists. 

Joseph M. McCafferty 

En 531 Crime Fiction (S; 3) 

Detective fiction as an art form studied in the works of Poe, Doyle, 
Chesterton, Sayers, Hammett, Chandler, Stout, Simenon, Van 
Gulik, Christie, Tey, and Macdonald. Critical assessments will 
take direction from appraisals by Auden, Wilson, Barzun, Van 
Doren, Krutch, Grella, Crider, Knox, Highet, and Sir Hugh Greene. 
A transcultural course of literary, psychological, and sociological 
dimensions. John McAJeer 

En 533 The Ulysses Line (F; 3) 

A study of a number of major works in the Western tradition, 
specifically those most important in the formation of James 
Joyce's novel, Ulysses. In addition to Ulysses, the following books 



will be studied in some detail. The Odyssey, Hamlet, and A por- 
trait of the Artist as a Young Man. Paul Doherty 

En 534 The Self-Conscious Novel (F; 3) 

A study of major works in the history of narrative fiction, focusing 
on the development of a tradition of novels about the writing and 
reading of fiction. Readings will include works by Rabelais, Cer- 
vantes, Sterne, Gide, Borges and others. Robin Lydenberg 

En 535 Classics of Fiction (S; 3) 

A study of the major novels representative of English and Amer- 
ican fiction. The novels to be studied are, Jane Austen, Emma; 
Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Thomas Hardy, Tess of the 
D'Ubervilles, and William Faulkner, The Sound and the 
Fury. Joseph Longo 

En 536 Medicine in Literature (S; 3) 

A survey of the wide range of literary forms, from the 1 7th century 
essay of Sir Thomas Browne to the poetry of Anne Sexton and 
a novel of Celine's portraying the problems and preoccupations 
of doctors and patients. P. Albert Duhamel 

En 537 Realism and Naturalism (S; 3) 

Establishment of criteria by which naturalistic and/or realistic 
content of a work of fiction is determined. Considerations of 
counter-romantic commitments of such literature and its success 
in putting existing norms to rout. A close reading of Crane, James, 
Wharton, Anderson, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Dreiser, Capote, Sal- 
inger, and Knowles. 

Lectures, with students having option of interrupting to give 
or seek information. John McAIeer 

En 538 History of Language (S; 3) 

A survey of the changes through history of the English language, 
and of the people who spoke it, at various crucial points in history 
(internal and external history), with an attempt to understand 
how changes in a language reflect important changes in the cul- 
ture and society of speakers of the language (notice current mas- 
culine-feminine confusions in the pronoun). A systematic method 
of looking at and describing a sample of language — past, present, 
or future — will evolve. An interest in language, words, and history 
on the student's part would be helpful. Raymond Biggar 

En 539 Metaphysical Poets (S; 3) 

A study of the religious poetry (and, in the case of Donne, the 
secular poetry) of John Donne, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, 
Richard Crashaw and Thomas Traherne. Richard Hughes 

En 540 Religion and Imagination (S; 3) 

An examination of how the great writers, within and without the 
orthodox religious tradition, sought to answer the ultimate ques- 
tions: where do we come from? what are we? where are we going? 
The great 19th century debates between evangelical and con- 
servative, between liberal and agnostic, take on a new significance 
in the light of post-Vatican II developments: the century strives 
for a synthesis only now becoming fully available. We will trace 
the story of breakthroughs in religious consciousness and literary 
form, in the great novels of Austen, Trollope, Bronte, Eliot, Pater 
and in their contexts in poetry and prose from Wordsworth to 
Wilde. Dennis Taylor 

En 541 Senior Seminar: Eliot (S; 3) 

We will discuss individual poems in detail to build a sense of 
Eliot's poetic development, in which context we will consider 
some of his critical writing. Anne Ferry 

En 542 Humor (S; 3) 

An experimental course that will attempt to see whether the study 
of humor theory and humorous literature can enhance our sense 
of humor and our ability to write humorous prose. Or will this 
process shrivel our brains and leave us incapable of crossing 
streets and changing light bulbs? Theorists to be studied will 
include Freud, Bergson, Koestler, and Rothbart; humorists to be 
read will include Shakespeare, Austen, Poe, and Woody Allen. 
And then we will set out, alone and in groups, to write, perform, 
and evaluate humorous works of our own. Paul Lewis 

En 551 Critical Approaches to Literature (S; 3) 

An opportunity for the advanced undergraduate to evaluate and 
integrate, through the discussion of selected essays from a wide 



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range of modern critics, his/her experience with various ways of 
studying and teaching literature. Through weekly papers the 
course is also intended to provide opportunities for the student 
to develop his/her ability to write critical reviews in any of the 
arts. P' Albert DuhameJ 

En 552 (SI 216) Poetic Theory (S; 3) 

Traditional and contemporary theories of metre and prosody will 
be described and analyzed within the framework of modern struc- 
tural and generative approaches to language as well as from the 
point of view of (Russian) Formalism. Textual material will be 
mainly English although texts from any language may be pre- 
sented by students for analysis in required term papers. 

Lawrence Jones 

En 554 History of Criticism (S; 3) 

Through a reading of the principal classical and English critics, 
this course will investigate the sources of the concerns that have 
been most important to British and American critics of the twen- 
tieth century. Among the authors read will be Plato, Aristotle, 
Horace, Longinus, Sidney, Dryden, Addison, Johnson, Words- 
worth, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Arnold, Yeats, Eliot, Richards, and 
Leavis. William Youngren 

En 570 Techniques of Precise Expression (F; 3) 

Ever feel you can't think of the exact word to express your 
thoughts or feelings? Ever unsure about how accurately the word 
you selected conveys the intended meaning? Have you tried mem- 
orizing lists of words and failed? This course provides an op- 
portunity to develop your active vocabulary and to utilize words 
with precision and flexibility. John Fitzgerald 

En 571 (SI 233) Applied English Grammar and Style (F; 3) 

A review of English grammar on modern principles, with a view 
to their application in the writing of clear English prose. Samples 
of various genres of literary style will be read and used as models 
for composition exercises. Lawrence G. Jones 

En 572 Prose Writing (F; 3) 

A practical course designed to help students sharpen the skills 
needed in all forms of writing: finding and narrowing a subject, 
gathering specific information, addressing an audience, and ed- 
iting to achieve greater clarity and force. Weekly papers and 
weekly conferences. This course is open to majors and non- 
majors, to all students who want to improve as writers. Limited 
enrollment. Paul Lewis 

The Department 

En 573 Writing Workshop: Business Writing (F; 3) 

An integrated series of discussions and exercises designed to 
develop proficiency in clear, vigorous writing, for business and 
other practical applications. Daniel L. McCue, Jr. 

En 578 Writing Workshop: Imitation (F; 3) 

Study and imitation of prose selections (non-fiction) by some 
important English and American writers. Frequent writing as- 
signments. The writers who will serve as models are Pepys, Ad- 
dison, Hume, Gibbon, Hazlitt, Thoreau, Twain, Hemingway, and 
Orwell. Limited enrollment Paul Doherty 

En 579 Writing Workshop: Fiction (F; 3) 

A workshop for improving skills in writing imaginative fic- 
tion. Leonard Casper 

En 580 Writing Workshop: Short Story (S; 3) 

The purpose of the course is to supply opportunities for students 
to write short fiction and to receive critical comment as work is 
in progress as well as when it is finished. John Sullivan 

En 582 Writing Workshop: Film Scenario (F; 3) 

This course will proceed: 

1. from short story to film scenario 

2. from original script to film scenario 

The recently completed TV series on the American Short Story 
(now published in 2 vols.) will furnish short story texts, film 
scenarious, director interviews, and one authoritative analysis of 
the author's work. Joseph McCafferty. 



En 584 Writing Workshop: Technical (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is designed to expose students to the technical writing 
field and to help students develop skill in writing various types 
of reports and business letters. 

This is a practical course offered to prepare students in a variety 
of fields for future report, business letter and proposal writing. 
It is not a remedial course. Students will be encouraged to choose 
writing assignment topics in their own fields of interest. 

Rita Long 

En 585 Writing Workshop Essay and the Article (S; 3) 

Methods of writing non-fiction, with some reading in contem- 
porary writers like E. B. White and George Orwell. Frequent short 
papers will be required. Limited enrollment. 

Francis Sweeney, S.J. 



En 591 Scholar of the College Project 

By arrangement 



The Department 



En 599 Undergraduate Reading & Research (F, S; 3, 3) 

By arrangement The Department 

ELECTIVE COURSES OPEN TO BOTH 
GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

En 600 Contemporaries of Chaucer (F; 3) 

There was a flowering of Middle English literature in the 14th 
century, best represented by the poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer. This 
course examines the most important non-Chaucerian writings — 
often quite different from Chaucer, but not always inferior to 
him — of this creative and vital century, such as William Langland, 
John Gower, the Gawain-poet, and the 14th century English mys- 
tics. The reading is mostly in Middle English, with some readings 
in modern translation. There are no prerequisites. 

Raymond Biggar 

En 601 Arthurian Legend (S; 3) 

An examination of the story of Arthur as found in the early re- 
mains (Nennius, The Annals of Wales), Welsh tales (Mabinogion), 
the chronicles (Geoffrey, Wace, Layamon), the romances (Chre- 
tien de Troyes, Wolfram von Eschenbach, Sir Thomas Malory). 

Charles Regan 

En 606 Old English (F; 3) 

A study of the Old English language through a reading of selected 
prose and poetic texts — the Alfredian Bede and Orosius. The 
Wife's Lament, The Seafarer, The Wanderer, The Battle of Mal- 
don, The Dream of the Rood — with assignments in grammar and 
vocabulary and readings in significant scholarship, with reports. 
Open with permission to undergraduates. Charles Regan 

En 607 Medieval Drama (S; 3) 

A study of the awakening and development of drama in the 
Middle Ages, with emphasis upon the English mystery cycles 
(Chester, Wakefield, N-Town and York) and the morality 
plays. Charles Regan 

En 608 The World of the Anglo-Saxons (S; 3) 

The course will provide a close reading of the heroic poem Beo- 
wulf, which exemplifies the artistic and social ideals of Anglo- 
Saxon England (500—1066). As background we will also read some 
classical works, Viking sagas, and contemporary records, all in 
translation. The course will run on two tracks for the benefit of 
those who have taken En 606 (formerly En 700), but there are no 
prerequisites, and no knowledge of medieval literature is 
assumed. Richard Shrader 



Fine Arts 



Faculty 

Professor Marianne W. Martin, Chairwoman of Department 
A.B., Hunter College; A.M., Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

Professor Josephine von Henneberg, Doctor in Letters, University 
of Rome 



38 / Arts and Sciences 

FINE ARTS 



Associate Professor Pamela Berger, A.B., A.M., Cornell University; 
Ph.D., New York University 

Associate Professor John Michalczyk, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston Col- 
lege; M.Div., Weston College School of Theology; Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Associate Professor Michael W. Mulhern, B.F.A., University of Day- 
ton; M.F.A., Columbia University 

Associate Professor John Steczynski, Acting Chairman of the 

Department 

B.F.A., Notre Dame University; M.F.A., Yale University 

Assistant Professor Edward A. Aiken, B.A., Claremont College; 
B.F.A., California College of Arts and Crafts; M.A., Ohio State 
Univerrity; Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Assistant Professor Kenneth M. Craig, A.B., A.M., Ohio State Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

Assistant Professor Jeffery W. Howe, A.B., Carleton College; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University 

Instructor Toni Dove, B.E.A., Rhode Island School of Design 

Visiting Artist Andrew Tavarelli, B.A., Queens College 



Program Description 

The Department offers two majors, one in Art History and another 
in Studio Art. A wide range of courses in film making, film his- 
tory, film critique and photography is also provided by the De- 
partment. 

Art History 

The major in Art History offers the interested student an oppor- 
tunity to develop a knowledge and understanding of the visual 
environment created by man in the course of time. The depart- 
mental courses provide both a broad foundation in the humanities 
and the preparation for further work that can lead to professional 
careers in art: teaching and research, curatorships, conservation, 
educational positions in museums and art centers, occupations 
as art critic or employment in the art business world such as 
commercial galleries and auction houses. A student majoring in 
Art History plans an integrated program in consultation with the 
departmental advisor. Students are encouraged to take as many 
courses as possible in history, literature, philosophy, foreign lan- 
guages, and other fields related to their specialization. For the 
Art History major a minimum of 11 courses must be completed 
in the following way: 

1. Fa 101-102 Introduction to Art History (2 courses), Fa 103-104 
Art History Workshop (2 courses) to be completed by the end 

of the Sophomore year. 

2. Seven additional courses of which four must have Fa numbers 
above the 300 level and three must have Fa numbers above 
the 200 level. 

At least one course must be chosen from each of the follow- 
ing periods: 

a. Ancient Art 

b. Medieval Art 

c. Renaissance through Eighteenth Century Art 

d. Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Art 

3. Fa 401 Seminar in Art Historical Research (3 credits) is re- 
quired and must be taken during the Junior or Senior year. 
This course may be counted as one of the seven courses listed 
in paragraph #2 above. 

Double Majors in the Department must fulfill all requirements 
for both majors. 

Studio Art 

The major is designed both for the student artist and the student 
interested in art. The departmental courses are conceived as an 
integral part of the liberal arts curriculum, and the studio major 
provides a solid basis for continuing work in graduate school and 
art related fields such as teaching, conservation, art therapy, pub- 
lishing or exhibition design. 



Studio Art Majors are required to take a minimum of 12 courses 
for a total of 36 credits, to be distributed as indicated below. The 
program is to be worked out in consultation with the depart- 
mental advisor. 

1. Fs 101, 102, 103 Foundations of Studio Art (9 credits) 
Drawing, Painting, Sculpture 

To be completed by the end of the Sophomore year. 

2. Fa 101-102 Introduction to Art History (6 credits) 
Fa 103 or Fa 104 Art History Workshop (3 credits) 

3. Six additional courses with Fs numbers. These must include 
at least two 300 level courses and the senior project (Fs 498). 
Students must have taken at least 4 semesters of work relating 
to their senior project prior to the Senior year. 

During their Sophomore year students intending to major in 
studio are asked to present a portfolio and to discuss their choice 
with the Department. 



Course Offerings 

Art History 

Fa 101-102 Introduction to Art History (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course provides a basis for intelligent understanding and 
enjoyment of the arts. The major monuments of western art from 
ancient times to the twentieth century are discussed and consid- 
ered in relation to the larger historical and cultural framework 
in which they were created. The class meets twice weekly for 
lectures and once in small discussion sections. Class assignments 
include the study of significant works of art in Greater Boston. 
The concurrent Art History Workshop (Fa 103-104) offers prac- 
tical experience with an insight into some of the chief technical 
and aesthetic questions facing the artist both in the more distant 
and recent periods. This studio course, which meets once a week, 
is highly recommended for students taking Fa 101-102. (Depart- 
mental majors, please consult requirements.) 

Fa 103-104 Art History Workshop (F, S; 3, 3) 

See course description above. 

Fa 108 Great Art Capitals of Europe (S, 3) 

For art historians, art lovers, urbanists and travelers. The course 
deals with the cities that led the Western world in artistic ac- 
complishments, among them Athens, Rome, Paris, and London. 
In these cities art styles were born and often reached their finest 
expression. Emphasis will be placed on the art that is collected 
in the museums and monuments of each city as well as on the 
city itself as a work of art. The growth of each city will be traced 
and the historic styles that shaped it defined. The Department 

Not open to students who have taken Fa 101 and Fa 102 

Fa 109 Aspects of Art (F; 3) 

This course will attempt to view Western art in terms of a number 
of universal considerations. Specific objects will be investigated 
with regard to such issues as structure, form, color, light, com- 
position and the like. We propose, then, to avoid the usual ap- 
proach to art as an historical sequence of works and styles and 
replace this with a method based on concepts. Hopefully, this 
will result in an alternate means of comparison and evaluation 
that will prove as educational as the more traditional modes of 
instruction. The Department 

Fa 151 Modern Art (F, S; 3) 

An introduction to art in the western world from the late eight- 
eenth century to the present. The work of some of the major 
painters and sculptors will be seen in relation to the contempo- 
rary cultural and political ferment which helped to shape it whilst 
being shaped by it in turn. Emphasis placed on French, English 
and German painters and sculptors. Among those included are: 
David, Ingres, Constable, Monet, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Matisse, 
Picasso, Kandinsky, Mondrian, Duchamp, and Dali. 

Jeffery Howe 

Fa 181 History of the European Film (F; 3) 

From a close study of various European films one detects certain 
patterns which are in retrospect designated as movements. Uti- 
lizing a survey approach, the course examines the principal move- 



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merits of Expressionism in Germany, Neo-realism in Italy, and 
the New Wave in France with an occasional maverick film that 
becomes monumental in the history of cinema. Lectures, read- 
ings, and discussion will reinforce the multiple viewings of 
films. John /. Michalczyk, S.J. 

Fa 182 The Documentary Film (S; 3) 

A film is not created in a vacuum, but represents the historical, 
social, economic and political milieu from which it emanates. 
The documentary works of the masters — Flaherty, Resnais, Ivens, 
Capra and Riefenstahl — will serve as an indisputable witness to 
these complex zones in our contemporary culture. 

John /. Michalczyk, S.J. 

Fa 211-212 (CI 212-213) Art of the Ancient Mediterranean 
World (F, S; 3, 3) 

The visual history and arts of the Ancient Mediterranean world 
will be studied from the rise of civilizations along the Nile, in 
the Holy Land, and Mesopotamia to the fall of the western Roman 
Empire, about 480. Cities, sacred areas, palaces, and building for 
communication, civic services and war will be included, as well 
as painting, sculpture, jewelry, and coinages. 

The Fall Term will emphasize Greek Art to the beginning of 
the Roman Empire. 

The Spring Term will be devoted to Roman Art in its broadest 
sense, beginning with Etruscan and Greek Italy in the Roman 
Republic. Cornelius Vermeule 

Fa 221 Art of the Early Medieval World (F; 3) 

This course treats the Early Medieval period in the East and West. 
The catacombs, the sarcophagi, the illuminated manuscripts, the 
mosaics and wall paintings will be studied with a view to giving 
the students a method of approaching individual works of art, a 
method that should provide them with a language for analyzing 
and interpreting the art work of various ages. Pamela Berger 

Fa 222 Art of the Later Medieval World (S; 3) 

This course treats the arts of the Late Byzantine, Romanesque and 
Gothic periods: architecture, sculpture, mosaics, wall paintings, 
illuminated manuscripts and stained glass windows. Special at- 
tention will be devoted to the Byzantine and Romanesque castles 
with a view to acquainting students with the materials uncovered 
at the Boston College archaeological dig at the Castle of the Forty 
Columns in Cyprus. (See Hs 212 Introduction to 
Archaeology.) Pamela Berger 

Fa 223 Medieval Art In France (F; 3) 

The aims of this course are three-fold: to set forth the development 
of Medieval Art in France, to teach students to analyze significant 
stylistic changes, and to have the student experience what it 
means to deal with this material in the French language. The 
student will be encouraged to look carefully at works of art both 
through slides in the classroom, and through visits to the 
museum. Pamela Berger 

Fa 225 Irish Art (F; 3) 

After a brief view of Irish megalithic art and Celtic art of La Tene 
Age in Europe, this course will turn to a study of the synthesis 
of Celtic motifs and aesthetic into the new Medieval style forged 
in Ireland. Pamela Berger 

Fa 231 The Arts of the Italian Renaissance (F; 3) 

The painting, sculpture, architecture of the Renaissance in Italy 
will be studied from the early fifteenth century in Florence to the 
sixteenth century in Rome. The lives and works of the principal 
artists will be discussed as well as their relationships to the pa- 
tronage of the Medici, the Popes and the princely Courts in North- 
ern Italy. Josephine von Henneberg 

Fa 232 Renaissance Art in Northern Europe (F; 3) 

Painting and sculpture in France, the Low Countries and Germany 
from the late fourteenth through the early sixteenth centuries. 
Emphasis on the roots of fifteenth century art in the International 
Style, on masters of painting such as Campin, the Van Eycks, 
Rogier van der Weyden, Hugo van der Goes, Hieronymus Bosch, 



Griinewald, Diirer, as well as on the sculpture of Tilmann Rie- 
menschneider and Veit Stoss. Kenneth Craig 

Fa 241 The Age of Baroque (F; 3) 

The seventeenth century is one of the great epochs in the history 
of art. The style of this period, the Baroque, swept all of Europe. 
Yet it is hardly a uniform phenomenon since it can range from 
the brilliantly intellectual to the touchingly emotional. What links 
this wonderful variety is the desire to produce a new naturalism 
in the visual arts. This is the thread that connects artists as diverse 
as Caravaggio, Bernini, Rubens, Poussin, Rembrandt, and the Car- 
racci — the Titans of the age. Their work is the principal focus of 
this course. Kenneth Craig 

Fa 251 Modern Architecture (S; 3) 

The evolution of modern architectural form from the late eight- 
eenth century revival styles to individual architects of the twen- 
tieth century such as F. L. Wright, Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, 
Le Corbusier. Jeffery Howe 

Fa 253 Cinema and Modern Art (F; 3) 

The motion picture has had a significant effect on the course of 
20th Century Art. Such artists as Marcel Duchamp, Fernand Leger 
and Salvador Dali not only turned to the cinema as a fertile source 
of new ideas for their paintings, but in addition they also made 
their own films. Artists and poets of such diverse movements as 
Cubism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dada, Surrealism and Con- 
structivism found in the cinema a potent means for the realization 
of their own specific aesthetic programs. Students with an interest 
in film, modern art or poetry will find this course of special 
interest. Edward A. Aiken 

Fa 256 Impressionism and Neo-Impressionism (S; 3) 

The course emphasizes the origins and development of Impres- 
sionism in France, with special attention paid to the art of Rous- 
seau, Daubigny, Millet, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Monet, Renoir and 
Pissarro. Parallel developments in England and Germany will 
also be considered before examining the changes in principle and 
form that were introduced by the Neo-Impressionists, Seurat and 
his friends and followers. The course will conclude with an as- 
sessment of the historical significance of Impressionism as a force 
acting on subsequent artistic endeavors. Jeffery Howe 

Fa 267 From Salt-Box To Skyscraper: Architecture in America 
17th-20th Centuries (F; 3) 

This course will trace the development of architecture in America 
from colonial times to the present. Particular attention will be 
paid to monuments in New England, with field trips to important 
buildings in the Boston Area. In addition to studying stylistic 
changes, the class will consider the significance of changes in 
building technology and social needs for the history of 
architecture. Jeffery Howe 

Fa 272 African Art (S; 3) 

The traditional arts of sub-Saharan Africa are charged with an 
emotional intensity and clarity of form that the art of few other 
cultures can match. This survey will present African sculpture 
as the visible expression of a complex transcendental world of 
African philosophy and religion. Architecture and textiles will 
also be discussed in the context of "tribal" life. Kenneth Craig 

Fa 274 Gods and Goddesses of India (S; 3) 

From the artifacts of the Indus Valley Civilization; through the 
rise of Buddhism and the culmination of Buddhist sculpture in 
the Gupta Period; to Hindu works of the medieval period. (In- 
cludes related Buddhist material in China and Japan). 

The Department 

Fa 282 The Political Fiction Film (S; 3) 

On one hand film has been designed to entertain. On the other, 
it has been created to propagandize especially by a government 
in crisis or an individual with a cause. The political fiction genre, 
internationally launched with Costa-Gavras' Z, combines both 
objectives. It is an attempt to blend cleverly a sophisticated ide- 
ology with attractive entertainment. Films from America (All the 



40 / Arts and Sciences 

FINE ARTS 



President's Men), France (Z), and Italy [Battle of Algiers) will be 
screened to illustrate this thesis. John J. MichaJczyk, S.J. 

Fa 284 The Eastern European Film (F; 3) 

In the films emanating from Eastern Europe prior to and following 
World War II, several thematic patterns can be detected — a preoc- 
cupation with war and Resistance, the absurdity of daily life, 
political manipulation, progressive dehumanization, and collec- 
tive heroism. Polanski, Wajda and Lenica from Poland, Kadar, 
Forman and Menzel from Czechoslovakia. Szabo and Jancso from 
Hungary, and Eisenstein and Pudovkin from the Soviet Union — 
all represent various thrusts to the European cinema industry. 
The films of these directors, often couched in surrealistic, his- 
torical, and animated allegories, are studied carefully for tech- 
nique and content and situated in their historical context through 
parallel readings. John /. MichaJczyk, S.J. 

Fa 286 History of Photography as a Fine Art (S; 3) 

A study of photography from the 1830's to the present day in 
France, England, and the United States. Style and subject matter 
are emphasized rather than technical processes. The course will 
consider the work of individual photographers such as Nadar, 
Talbot, Stieglitz, as well as the reciprocal relationship between 
photography and modern art. The Department 

Fa 288 (Rl 362) A Pleiade of French Literary Film Directors 
(F;3) 

Seven French novelists evolved from the written word to the 
celluloid image each in a unique manner. Cocteau, Malraux, 
Robbe-Grillet, Duras, Giono, Pagnol and Guitry made contribu- 
tions to both media. This course analyzes the technique, content, 
and characterization in both the cinematic and literary work of 
art, as in the case of Cocteau's Orpheus or Malraux's Man's Fate. 
Offered 1982-83 John J. MichaJczyk, S.J. 

Fa 313 (CI 313) Athens in the Age of Pericles (F; 3) 

In the fifth century B.C. the city of Athens was the center of Greek 
artistic and intellectual life. The high classical style that devel- 
oped here in sculpture, architecture and painting marks a golden 
age of western civilization. This course will study the art and the 
architectural monuments of the Athens that the ancients knew, 
including the topography of the city, tapping both archaeological 
and literary evidence. Kenneth Craig 

Fa 332 The Age of Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael (S; 3) 

The "High Renaissance" lasted only a short while, but it produced 
artists of such unqualified excellence that the age became known 
through history as one of the high points of western civilization. 
The lives and works of these men will be examined in detail, 
with the socio-historical conditions that made their development 
possible. Josephine von Henneberg 

Fa 333 Venetian Painting (F; 3) 

Giorgione, Titian, Tintoretto, and Tiepolo are some of the most 
celebrated members of an unbroken painterly tradition that ex- 
tends from the mid-fifteenth to the early nineteenth century and 
beyond. The course focuses on the achievements of these 
masters. Josephine von Henneberg 

Fa 341 Diirer and His Contemporaries (S; 3) 

Sixteenth century art in Germany and the Netherlands. The rich 
and sometimes puzzling imagery of the period will be studied 
against a background of complex artistic and historical influences 
in Northern Europe. The course will concentrate on leading mas- 
ters of the era including Diirer, Cranach, Jerome Bosch, and Pieter 
Bruegel the Elder. The Department 

Fa 342 Age of Rembrandt (S; 3) 

The golden age of Baroque painting in Holland will be studied 
against the historical background of changing patterns in religious 
thought, political alliances and patronage throughout Europe. 
Focus will be on Hals, Rembrandt and Vermeer as well as on the 
development of genre and landscape. Kenneth Craig 

Fa 344 From Bernini to Wren: Architecture of the Baroque (S; 3) 

Soaring domes, undulating facades, and magnificent vistas are 
just a few of the characteristics that make seventeenth-century 
architecture one of the most delightful and rewarding studies in 
the history of western art. Rome was the cradle of this distinctive 



architectural style as artists like Bernini and Borromini changed 
the face of that city. But the Baroque style in architecture spread 
rapidly and it became the symbol of the wealth and power of 
nations. This survey — from Bernini in Rome to Christopher Wren 
in post-conflagration London — will present the great architectural 
monuments of the age as well as the artistic personalities who 
were responsible for their creation. Josephine von Henneberg 

Fa 345 The Art of The Counter-Reformation (S; 3) 

The impact of the Counter-Reformation on the visual arts in Italy 
and northern Europe. Focus on the ideas and events that changed 
the subjects and the styles of painting, sculpture and architecture 
from the mid-sixteenth century to the seventeenth century: John 
Calvin and Protestant iconoclasm; the canons and decrees of the 
Council of Trent; the foundation of the Jesuit order and its sub- 
sequent impact on patronage. Special attention to the work of the 
masters whose styles simmered in the crucible of change such 
as Rubens in Antwerp and Caravaggio and the Carracci ir 
Italy. Kenneth Craij 

Fa 355 From Gauguin to Dali: Late 19th and Early 20th Centurj 
Art (F; 3) 

From an examination of the diverse reactions to Impressionisn 
in the 1880's the course proceeds to a discussion of art nouveau 
sculptural trends around 1900, to the rise of Expressionism ir 
France and Germany. The creation of Cubism, Italian Futurism 
the evolution of abstract art are traced, and, finally, the anti 
rational currents from Dada to Surrealism are analyzed. 

Marianne W. Martir 

Fa 356 Art Since 1945 (S; 3) 

A study of the history of painting and sculpture from 1945 to the 
present. Emphasis will be placed on the origins and developmen 
of Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, and Color Field Painting 
Some attention will also be paid to the persistence of the Sur 
realist tradition. Jeffery Howi 

Fa 357 Modern Sculpture in Europe (F; 3) 

The history of sculpture 1830-1980, with concentration on the 
period 1880-1940. Artists to be studied include: Rude, Carpeaux 
Rodin, Matisse, Brancusi, Duchamp, Lipchitz and Moore. The 
course will analyze and attempt to account for the radical shift} 
in form, content and technique during this era of discovery anc 
innovation. Marianne W. Martir 

Fa 358 Picasso, Stein and Company (S; 3) 

Pablo Picasso and Gertrude Stein as foci of an examination of the 
arts in Paris, circa 1900 to 1920. Other important figures to be 
studied include the painters Matisse, Braque, Leger, Delaunaj 
and Duchamp; the poet and critic Apollinaire; the composer; 
Debussy, Satie and Stravinsky; and the impresario Diaghilev anc 
the dancer Nijinsky of the Ballets Russes. Lectures and extensive 
discussion. Difficulty is one of the hallmarks of modern art gen 
erally. This course seeks to develop skills in the analysis, inter 
pretation and evaluation of difficult works in the several arts 
e.g., Picasso's DemoiseJJes d' Avignon, Stein's Tender Buttons anc 
Stravinsky's Le Sacre du Printemps. Previous work in art historj 
is recommended. Marianne W. Martir 

Fa 381 The Propaganda Film: From the Aesthetic to the 
Manipulative (S; 3) 

The film as a celluloid weapon created to move, incite or educate 
has been utilized socially and politically for more than half i 
century. This course will differentiate between aesthetic and pro 
pagandistic elements in the film by examining a cross-section o 
films on the international scene — Potemkin, Triumph of the Will 
Hearts and Minds, Why We Fight, The Spanish Earth, etc. 

John J. MichaJczyk, S.J 

Fa 391 Museum Studies (F; 3) 

An introductory survey of the history, theory and social function; 
of museums and aspects of museum works, such as acquisition 
conservation, exhibition and cataloguing. Class time will be de 
voted largely to visits to local institutions for talks with theii 
staffs and first-hand study of their operations. The major clas; 
project will be the organization and installation of an exhibitior 
in the Boston College Gallery. Previous work in art history h 
recommended. The Departmeni 



Arts and Sciences / 41 

FINE ARTS 



A nominal fee which includes membership in the Museum of 
Fine Arts is charged for this course. 

Fa 401 Seminar in Art Historical Research (F; 3) 

The seminar aims to acquaint the student with the bibliography 
and research methods necessary for scholarly work in art history. 
The student prepares a substantial research paper under the direc- 
tion of the professor and presents it orally to the class. 

Kenneth Craig 
Jeffery Howe 

Fa 402 Connoisseurship and Art Criticism (S; 3) 

A course dealing with practical and theoretical aspects of the 
critical evaluation of works of art. Various significant critical 
approaches and actual works of art will be examined. 

The Department 

Fa 403-404 Independent Work (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course may be offered from time to time to allow students 
to study a particular topic which is not included in the courses 
that are offered. The Department 

Fa 408 On Quality in Art (S; 3) 

The course explores attempts from Vasari to Gombrich at for- 
malizing critical judgments of artistic works in order to investi- 
gate the possibility of objective judgment. Works of art will be 
discussed in conjunction with the writings of Winckelmann, Bau- 
delaire, Burckhardt, Berenson, Roger Fry, Apollinaire, Breton, 
Panofsky, and others. Marianne W. Martin 

Note: A nominal fee is charged for film courses. 



Studio Art (including Film and Photography) 

Fs 001-002 Introduction to Studio Art (F, S; 3, 3) 

The course, geared to the Liberal Arts student, provides both an 
academic and contemporary approach to drawing and painting, 
with elementary and advanced theory of design, composition, 
and organization. It includes figure drawing from live model, 
formal structure, introductory anatomy, foreshortening, compo- 
sition and chiaroscuro in charcoal, conte crayon, pastel and an 
introduction to color. 

The second semester is devoted to the use of various media: 
oil painting, water color, pastel, conte crayon, and an introduction 
to modeling in clay. Assignments include review portfolios. 

Paul S. Keaveney 

Fs 003-004 Introduction to Ceramics (F, S; 3, 3) 

An introductory course for students desiring a foundation knowl- 
edge in the possibilities of clay. This course will deal with all 
phases of ceramics from slab construction to bowl making and 
a good deal of effort will go into considering a variety of sculptural 
possibilities at a foundation level. 

The emphasis in the second semester will be on combining the 
various techniques and concepts acquired previously into a work- 
ing order, as well as an exposure to additional technical and 
conceptual information. Mark Cooper 

Fs 101-102-103 Foundations of Studio Art (F, S; 3, 3) 

An introductory course for Studio Majors and others pursuing art 
seriously. The course focuses on the attitudes and elements that 
lead to an individual vision. It is divided into three parts: draw- 
ing, painting and sculpture. It is a prerequisite for most other 
studio courses. Each semester's work receives grade and credit 
as one course. Michael Mulhern 

Andrew TavareJli 

Fs 161 Photography for Art Students (F, S; 3) 

This course in beginning photography is oriented toward those 
with an interest in contemporary art and self-expression. Topics 
to be covered include exposure and development of film, printing, 
and mounting for exhibition. Regular visits to galleries, museums 



and lectures will be expected of each student in addition to the 
assembly of a final portfolio. Charles Meyer 

Jim Stone 

Fs 171 Basic Film-making (F, S; 3) 

How an observation can be turned into a vision. Projects in silent 
film-making: angle, cut, light, take, shot breakdown, and dream. 
A class for beginners. Equipment is provided. Ken Brown 

Fs 173 Animation I (F, S; 3) 

This course covers a variety of basic animation techniques. We 
emphasize "hands on" experience in bringing ideas and fantasies 
to life through animation. Work is done both individually and in 
small groups. Ken Brown/Lisa Crafts 

Fs 203-204 Drawing I: Structural Drawing (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 101 or permission of the instructor. 
A course which uses the classical academic drawing tradition as 
a discipline to integrate intellectual analysis, visual accuracy, and 
manual control through the rendering of objects. Students are 
expected to master proportion, perspective, foreshortening, mod- 
eling, and spatial rendering in a variety of media. 

The Department 

Fs 213-214 PrintmakingI (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 
As an introduction to printmaking, this course centers around 
demonstrations and discussions of various etching and engraving 
methods (hard ground, soft ground, aquatint, liftground, engrav- 
ing, and a multiple image). It includes discussions of both the 
historical significance and present use of these more traditional 
techniques in conjunction with contemporary methods of intaglio 
(color, cut plates, found objects, viscosity, mixed medium) and 
relief printing. The focus will be on the print as a vehicle in 
establishing a personal vision. Michael Mulhern 

Fs 221 Color (F; 3) 

A course concerned primarily with sensitizing the student to 
understanding, seeing and using color with more subtlety and 
sophistication. The course has two components: a technical part 
dealing primarily with color mixture and color interaction; and 
an intuitive part, consisting of free color studies. Most work is 
done in gouache and collage. The Department 

Fa 223-224 Painting I (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 
The course focuses on the acquistion of basic painting skills and 
on the attitudes, awareness, and satisfactions that accompany this 
experience. Students will explore still life, figure painting, land- 
scape and abstraction. Although class time is primarily spent 
painting, there are frequent discussions, critiques and slide pres- 
entations of paintings. It is suggested that students have some 
familiarity with and interest in painting or drawing before elect- 
ing the course. Andrew Tavarelli 

Fs 225-226 Watercolor I (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 
An introduction to the various materials and techniques of water- 
color. Toni Dove 

Fs 241-242 Ceramics I (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 101, 103 or permission of the instructor. 
Stress is placed on the basic fundamentals of ceramics as a means 
for self-expression through sculptural or functional concerns. The 
course is conducted through informal talks, slide lectures, and 
demonstrations. These include orientation and exploration of the 
possibilities of clay and glaze, technical background, history and 
attitudes towards ceramic objects. Students are required to spend 
an appropriate time outside of class on specific projects. 

Mark Cooper 

Fs 251-252 Three Dimensional Design I (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 101, 103 or permission of the instructor. 
Focus in the course is placed on realizing and understanding 
forms and objects in space. Design and compositional elements 
of these concepts will be discussed and explored through a series 
of projects. Slide lectures, demonstrations, and critiques will ex- 
amine both traditional (the sculptural object, the relief, etc.) and 
contemporary concerns (chance environmental, 3-D painting, 3- 



42 / Arts and Sciences 

GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS 



D drawing, etc.) Emphasis will be placed on developing a broad 
vocabulary and personal vision. Michael Mulhern 

Fs 261 Photography II (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 161 or permission of the instructor. 
A course exploring the potential of the photographic image for 
personal expression. Lectures will include a brief history of pho- 
tography as a creative art, and the class will visit gallery exhibits 
when appropriate. James Stone 

Fs 273 Intermediate Film-making (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Previous film-making experience and permission of 
the instructor. 

What pictures and sounds do to each other. Projects in sound 
film-making: dubbing, mixing, interview, dialogue, and inner 
voice. Equipment is provided. Charles Meyer 

Fs 275 Animation II (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Animation I, or special permission of the instructors. 
An extension of Animation I, using more advanced techniques 
and working towards several complete short films. Ken Brown 

Lisa Crafts 

Fs 301-302 Drawing II: Figure Drawing (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 203—204 or permission of the instructor. 
Studies from the model with emphasis on the utilization of line 
as an indicator of the musculature and forms of the body. Various 
problems of refinement and spatial consideration: i.e., model in 
relation to Cubist space, architectural space, etc., will be given 
special consideration. Aileen Callahan 

Fs 307-308 Drawing III: Advanced Drawing (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 301-302 or permission of the instructor. 
Problems from a broad range of stimuli and ideas. Pictorial images 
are developed from the internal needs of the drawing itself rather 
that from such external considerations as representation or 
illustration. The Department 

Fs 313-314 Printmaking II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 213-214 

Development of expertise in various intaglio methods of printing, 
particularly color printing, cut plate techniques, collagraphs and 
multicolor (relief-intaglio) dimensional prints, etc. 

While a number of problems will be introduced, students will 
be able to choose and explore the methods most congenial to their 
vision and goals. Michael Mulhern 

Fs 323-324 Painting II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 223-224 or permission of the instructor 
This course is designed for more advanced students who are 
familiar with the fundamentals of painting and wish to broaden 
and strengthen this foundation. The format of the course is similar 
to Painting I but differs in the sophistication and complexity of 
the painting issues covered. Students are encouraged to begin to 
work toward more personal means of painting. 

Andrew Tavarelli 

Fs 343-344 Ceramics II: Wheelthrowing (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 241-242 or permission of the instructor. 
Fundamentals of throwing on the potter's wheel. Emphasis is 
placed on the development of throwing skills and the "vessel as 
a metaphor". During the second semester specific projects are 
given which assist the student in developing throwing skills at 
an advanced level. Emphasis is placed on design, surface, and 
concept. Seminars, lectures, slides, films, and field trips cover 
the possibilities of the ceramic medium. Mark Cooper 

Fs 351-352 Three Dimensional Design II 

Prerequisite: Fs 251-252 or permission of the instructor. 
This course is designed for the more advanced student who is 
familiar with the basic elements of 3-D design. Although the for- 
mat will be similar to 3-D Design I, specific problems such as 
wall environs, serial relations, minimal structures, etc. will be 
introduced to encourage the student to achieve a more individual 
expression. Michael Mulhern 

Fs 363 Advanced Photography II (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 261; 262 or permission of the instructor 

This course is designed for those with a strong commitment to 

still photography as a creative discipline. Students should be 



prepared to work intensively in an area of their own choosing 
with the class acting as a forum for the critique of continuing 
work. Charles Meyer 

Fs 367 Experimental Photography (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Fs 262 or permission of instructor 
This will be a one-semester course for those interested in pho- 
tography as a personally expressive medium. Encouragement will 
be given to the exploration of an individual direction for the 
student artist through non-standard application of photographic 
principles. Topics available for discussion include Sabettier ef- 
fect, High contrast, hand-applied color, toning, photogram, mul- 
tiple printing, and reticulation. Significant work outside of class 
will be expected. Jim Stone 

Fs 385-386 Independent Work (F, S; 3, 3) 

A course allowing students who have sufficient background to 
progress to a higher level or in a more specialized area than other 
courses allow. The student works independently, under the di- 
rection of a member of the Department. The Department 

Fs 485-486 Independent Work (F, S; 3, 3) 

A course allowing students who have sufficient background to 
progress to a higher level or in a more specialized area than other 
courses allow. The student works independently, under the di- 
rection of a member of the Department. The Department 

Fs 498 Senior Project (F; 3) 

Required of all Studio Art majors. Students must have taken at 
least 4 semesters of work relating to their project prior to the 
Senior year. Directed by a member of the Department and eval- 
uated by departmental review. The Department 

Fs 499 Advanced Seminar in Studio Art (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: For Studio or Art History majors only or permission 
of the instructor. 

The content of the seminar will be determined by the ongoing 
studio or art historical and critical work of the participants. This 
course will serve as a forum for the discussion of students' work 
and ideas. Critiques, lectures, slide presentations, readings, gal- 
lery visits, etc., will be utilized in the exploration of contemporary 
work. Michael Mulhern 



NOTE: A nominal laboratory fee is charged in most studio courses. 



Geology and Geophysics 



Faculty 



Professor James W. Skehan, S.J., Director, Weston Observatory 
A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Emanuel G. Bombolakis, B.S., M.S., Colorado 
School of Mines; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor Benno M. Brenninkmeyer, S.J., A.B., Boston 
College; Ph.D., University of Southern California 

Associate Professor George D. Brown, Jr., B.S., Saint Joseph's Col- 
lege; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Associate Professor J. Christopher Hepburn, Chairman of the 

Department 

A.B., Colgate University; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor David C. Roy, B.S., Iowa State University; 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Assistant Professor John F. Devane, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
M.S., Fordham University 

Assistant Professor John E. Ebel, A.B., Harvard University; Ph.D., 
California Institute of Technology 

Assistant Professor Rudolph Hon, M.Sc, Charles University; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 



Arts and Sciences / 43 

GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS 



Program Description 

Major in Geology or Geophysics 

An undergraduate in the Department of Geology and Geophysics 
may develop a program with an emphasis in Geology, Geophysics 
or a combination of Geology and Geophysics, or may formulate 
a more general course of study in Earth Science. Within the 
broadly defined constraints discussed below, programs are in- 
dividually designed to meet the interests and professional objec- 
tives of each student. It is recognized that students may wish to 
major or have concentration in the earth sciences for a variety of 
reasons including: 

1) a desire to work professionally in one of the earth sciences, 

2) a desire to obtain an earth science foundation preparatory 
to post-graduate work in environmental studies, resource 
management, environmental law, or other similar fields 
where such a background would be useful, 

3) a desire to teach earth science in secondary schools, or 

4) a general interest in the earth sciences. 

Broadly speaking, earth scientists seek by investigation to un- 
derstand the complicated dynamics and materials that charac- 
terize the earth. For some, the emphasis is on the composition, 
structure and history of the earth; for others, investigations are 
aimed at understanding geologic processes and the modifications 
of materials they produce. In all the earth sciences, the tools and 
principles of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and bio-sciences 
together with those unique to the fields of geology and geophysics 
are focused on the studies of the earth. For those planning careers 
in the earth sciences, therefore, supplemental work in a variety 
of sciences is required. 

Any major in Geology and/or Geophysics may elect to enroll 
in the Department Honors Program, provided a satisfactory scho- 
lastic average has been maintained (3.3 in the major, 3.2 overall). 
Application to the program should be made no earlier than the 
beginning of the junior year and no later than the beginning of 
the senior year. Each applicant must have a faculty advisor to 
supervise the proposed research project. Honors will be awarded 
upon: a) successful completion of a thesis based upon the pro- 
posed research project as evaluated by the faculty advisor; b) 
approval by the Undergraduate Program Committee of the thesis 
and the candidate's academic record. 

Students in the Department are urged to fulfill at least one of 
the elective courses with a project-oriented research course dur- 
ing their senior year. 

Students may propose substitutes for particular course require- 
ments by petitioning, in writing, the Department Undergraduate 
Policy Committee. 

Geology Major 

Students majoring in Geology will take the following courses: 
Introduction to Geology and Geophysics I and II, Mineralogy, 
Structural Geology I and II, Petrology I and II, Stratigraphy and 
Sedimentation and at least two additional electives (with a min- 
imum of one being numbered 300 or above) in the Department 
to bring the total number of Departmental courses to 10. Also 
required are a minimum of two semesters of Calculus, two se- 
mesters of Physics using Calculus (Ph 209-210 or Ph 211-212) 
and two semesters of Chemistry with laboratory (Ch 109-110, or 
Ch 117—118). The Department strongly advises at least four se- 
mesters of Calculus and a geology summer field course for anyone 
planning a professional career in geology. Credit from a summer 
field course may be used for one of the 300 level Departmental 
electives upon written approval of the chairman prior to taking 
the field course. Elective courses both within and outside the 
Department will be determined by the student and his or her 
advisor. 

Geophysics Major 

Students majoring in Geophysics will fulfill the following course 
requirements: Introduction to Geology and Geophysics I and II, 
ogy, Structural Geology II, Introduction to Geophysics, plus three 
other courses in geophysics, two additional Departmental elec- 
tives numbered 200 or above, and two additional electives ap- 
proved in advance by the student's advisor in Departmental 
courses numbered 400 or above or in advanced courses in Physics 



or Mathematics beyond those required below. (Note: May be ful- 
filled by a combination of courses such as one advanced De- 
partmental course and one advanced Physics course, etc.). Thus 
11 courses are required in addition to the outside science re- 
quirements. These outside science requirements for the Geo- 
physics major are: one year of Chemistry, with laboratory (Ch 
109-110 or Ch 117-118); six semesters of Calculus, and four se- 
mesters of Physics, to include at least two semesters of Physics 
from among the following: Ph 327, Ph 401, Ph 425, Ph 515, in 
addition to two semesters of Introduction to Physics with Cal- 
culus (Ph 209-210 or Ph 211-212). Courses in computer science 
and additional electives in geology are recommended in the elec- 
tive program. Elective courses both within and outside the de- 
partment will be determined by the student and his or her advisor. 



Geology-Geophysics Major 

This major may be desirable for those seeking the advantages of 
both programs and is considered excellent preparation for those 
looking toward employment in industry following graduation 
with a B.S. degree. However, the student is cautioned that this 
combined program is clearly more intensive than either of the 
separate majors in Geology or Geophysics. 

Students majoring in Geology-Geophysics will take the follow- 
ing courses: Introduction to Geology and Geophysics I and II, 
Mineralogy, Structural Geology I and II, Petrology I and II, one 
course in sedimentary geology, and at least three courses in Geo- 
physics. Also required are two semesters of Chemistry with lab- 
oratory (Ch 109-110 or Ch 117-118), six semesters of Calculus, 
and three semesters of Physics to include at least one semester 
of Physics from among the following: Ph 327, Ph 401, Ph 402, Ph 
425, Ph 515, in addition to two semesters of Introduction to Phys- 
ics with Calculus (Ph 209-210 or 211-212). Courses in computer 
science are highly recommended in the elective program. The 
student will plan an elective program in consultation with his or 
her advisor. 

Weston Observatory 

Director: James W. Skehan, S.J., Professor of Geology 

Weston Observatory, formerly Weston College Seismic Station 
(1928-1949), is now part of the Department of Geology and Geo- 
physics of Boston College. The Observatory, located 10 miles 
from Chestnut Hill, is an interdisciplinary research facility of the 
Department for education in the geosciences, and a center for 
research in the fields of geophysics, energy and environmental 
sciences. Research by faculty, research associates, and students 
is directed primarily to seismology, geomagnetism and ancient 
movements of the Earth's plates. Weston Observatory was one of 
the first participating facilities in the Worldwide Standardized 
Seismograph network and also operates a forty-station regional 
seismic network which records data on earthquakes in the north- 
east as well as distant earthquakes. The Observatory is also the 
headquarters of the New England Seismotectonic Study, a co- 
operative effort to determine the distribution and causes of New 
England seismicity. A geomagnetic research facility established 
at the Observatory in 1958, is instrumented for absolute magnetic 
observations, the continuous recording of variations in the com- 
ponents of the earth's magnetic field, and a magnetic field can- 
celling coil system for experiments requiring reduction of the 
ambient magnetic field. Regional geologic and plate tectonic mod- 
eling studies are chiefly concerned with the origin and evolution 
of the Northern Appalachian Mountains of the United States and 
Maritime Canada and their relation to similar rock sequences in 
Ireland, the British Isles, western Europe and Africa. These stud- 
ies include research on the coal-bearing strata of Pennsylvanian 
age (280—310 million years) in the Narragansett Basin in south- 
eastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island and related deposits in 
Pennsylvania and Europe. 

Core Program 

Core Program: The CORE course offerings in the Department re- 
flect the view that the planet Earth is the only one we shall ever 
live upon. This uniqueness requires that we consider the impli- 
cations of our actions in our environment, whether they be the 



44 / Arts and Sciences 

GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS 



discharge of pollution, the use of petroleum and other natural 
resources, or the places in which we choose to live. The physical, 
chemical and biological factors of our environment home are a 
complex that affect all of us, some in direct and serious fashion; 
others in indirect and minor ways. However we view the earth 
we live upon, we are directly tied to it. The courses that we 
include for offering as CORE courses include a variety of subjects, 
approaches, and viewpoints. The variability provides maximum 
freedom of choice at both introductory and advanced levels, al- 
though all presume no prior knowledge of the science. Though 
you will not become scientists by enrolling in these courses, per- 
haps you will learn to view our home planet in a different and 
hopefully, more responsible fashion. 

The following courses are intended for fulfillment of the sci- 
ence core requirement and have no prerequisites unless specified. 
Others may be substituted upon petition and consideration. 

An asterisk after a course title indicates that a course carries 
a laboratory fee. 



Course Offerings 



Core Courses 

Ge 115 Planet Earth I* (F; 3) 

An introduction to the concepts and processes of our only home 
and its environment, planet Earth. Simulated field trips will be 
used in an Audio-Tutorial format to enable the student to expe- 
rience the physical aspects of geology, and guide much of his or 
her own development in the subject. One two-hour A— T session 
and two one-hour lectures per week. The Department 

Ge 125 Planet Earth II* (S; 3) 

A sequel to Ge 115, this course will explore the development of 
planet Earth, especially North America and the United States, 
and the biological evolution of the creatures that inhabit its sur- 
face. The Audio-Tutorial format will be used to examine repre- 
sentative or specific areas. One two-hour A— T session and two 
one-hour lectures per week. Ge 115 is not a prerequisite for this 
course. The Department 

Ge 132 Introduction to Geology and Geophysics I (F; 3) 

An introduction to the important geological and geophysical pro- 
cesses operating on and within the earth. Intended for geology 
and geophysics majors, majors in other sciences, and other stu- 
dents wishing a more advanced course than is given in Ge 
115-125. Fulfills core science requirement. Laboratory (Ge 133) 
is required for geology and geophysics majors. The Department 

Ge 134 Introduction to Geology and Geophysics II (S; 3) 

A continuation of Ge 132 with an emphasis on the use of the rock 
record in interpreting the history of the earth and the evolution 
of life forms. May be taken without Ge 132 with permission of 
instructor. Fulfills core science requirement. Laboratory (Ge 135) 
is required for geology and geophysics majors. The Department 

Ge 133-135 Introduction to Geology and Geophysics Laboratory* 
(F, S; 1, 1) 

Laboratory required for geology and geophysics majors and open 
to other interested students enrolled in Ge 132-134. 
One two-hour laboratory per week and field trips. 

Ge 143 Geologic Hazards, Landslides, and Earthquakes (F; 3) 

The origin of common types of earth material and several land- 
form features will be reviewed during the first few weeks. The 
purpose of this review is to prepare the way for the analysis of 
ancient, modern, and future geologic disasters. The analysis will 
deal with the type of catastrophe that eliminated the entire city 
of Helice, Greece, in 373 B.C.; recent disasters such as the Vaient 
dam disaster and the Alaskan earthquake; and the prediction of 
earthquakes in California and the eastern United States. 

E. G. Bombolakis 

Ge 145 Geophysical Predictions (S; 3) 

An overview of current prediction capabilities for geophysical 
events of the solid earth (earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides), the 
atmosphere (storms, tornadoes) and the hydrosphere (floods). 



Emphasis is placed on societal values of prediction as well as on 

accomplishments and still unsolved problems. 

Not offered 1982-83. /. F. Devane, S.J. 

Ge 150 Introduction to Astronomy* (S; 4) 

The solar system, the universe, bodies in space, and their origins 
and relationship are the focus of this course. The Audio-Tutorial 
format is used to allow for individualized study of selected topics. 
Three hours of lecture and one Audio-Tutorial session or tele- 
scope viewing per week. The Department 

Ge 160-162 The World of Oceans and Coastal Environments* 

(F, S; 4, 4) 

A discovery of the environments of the world's oceans and coast 
lines. Topics examined include a history of the growth of ocean 
basins, a description of the landforms and sediments found on 
the ocean bottom, the characteristics of ocean water, the move- 
ment of the water by waves, tides and currents, and the animals 
and plants that live in the deep and shallow waters. The second 
part is a study of the evolution, ecology and processes of beaches, 
coral reefs, estuaries, and deltas-areas where the ocean meets 
land. Man's effect upon and benefits from each of these environ- 
ments is stressed. 

Two one-hour lectures per week. One one-hour laboratory and 
one demonstration, film and/or discussion each week. Two field 
trips. Second semester can be taken without first semester. 

Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 

Ge 165 Geology and the Environment (F; 3) 

Natural processes on and near the earth's surface and our inter- 
action with them will be explored. The effects of our utilization 
of the earth's natural resources, especially petroleum, and our 
disposal of wastes on natural systems will also be 
examined. David C. Roy 

Ge 170 Introduction to Meteorology (F; 4) 

Description and examination of the properties and characteristics 
of the Earth's atmosphere. Meteorological instruments, analysis 
of relationships involving temperature, moisture, wind systems 
and fronts, and weather modifications will be discussed. 
Three hours of lecture and one discussion per week. 

The Department 

Ge 176 Extraterrestrial Geology (S; 3) 

Man is in the process of exploring the Solar System. The spec- 
tacular results and photographs of recent manned and unmanned 
space programs, including the Apollo (moon), Viking (Mars), Pi- 
oneer and Voyageur (Mercury, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn) will be 
reviewed to help develop models for the "geologic" evolution of 
these bodies and a current picture for the origin of the Solar 
System. The question of life on other planets, particularly Venus 
and Mars, will be discussed as will the impact of space explo- 
ration programs on our understanding of the earth's history. 
Three hours of lecture per week. Not offered 1982-83. 

/. Christopher Hepburn 

Ge 180-182 Introduction to Earth Science* (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course will cover the various disciplines that traditionally 
are considered as the Earth Sciences, namely, Geology, Ocean- 
ography, Meteorology, and Astronomy. The format will include 
an Audio-Tutorial session each week to present principal aspects 
of each of the above fields. The course will emphasize the inter- 
relations of these various disciplines and how they influence our 
existence on earth. 

Two lectures and one two-hour Audio-Tutorial session per 
week. Second semester may be taken without the first semester. 

James W. Ring, S.J. 

Ge 190 Origins of Man (F; 3) 

An introduction to the study of man as a biological creature. 
Organic in concept, this course will consider evolution, genetics, 
and the paleontologic record in establishing man's place in the 
realm of living things. Of particular concern are the primates, 
from Mesozoic ancestors to the present forms and Homo 
sapiens. George D. Brown, Jr. 

Ge 197 The Dynamic Earth (S; 3) 

The focus of this course is the dynamism of the earth as reflected 
in the "drifting" of continents, the opening of ocean basins, the 



Arts and Sciences / 45 

GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS 



devastation caused by earthquakes, the eruption of volcanoes, 
and the formation of mountain ranges. The evidence for the move- 
ments of continents and the opening of ocean basins will be 
examined with the non-science student in mind. The origin of 
earthquakes and recent advances in their prediction and possible 
control will be discussed. David C. Roy 



Major Courses 

The following courses are designed for majors in the Department 
or in sciences in general. Some courses have prerequisites, others 
do not. All however, may be taken by students who seek elective 
credit. 

Ge 200 Mineralogy* (S; 4) 

Prerequisites: Ge 132, 134, first year of Chemistry, may be taken 

concurrently. 

Introduction to crystallography, structure and crystal chemistry 

of selected important minerals and the rock-forming silicates. 

Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. 

Rudolph Hon 

Ge 240 Seminar in Regional Geology (S; 2 or 4 credits) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor 

A seminar which studies the regional geology of a specific area 
of North America or elsewhere. One evening meeting per week. 
Up to 16 students will be selected from the class to participate 
in a two-four week field trip to the study area. Four credits are 
awarded to students who complete both seminar and field trip. 
Oral and written reports are required. The Department 

Ge 264 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation* (S; 4) 

Prerequisite: Ge 132 and 134 or equivalent 

The sedimentary rock strata of the earth's crust will be studied 
in a systematic manner to develop principles and processes of 
origin and deposition. Lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic 
concepts will be considered along with time, time-rock, and rock 
classifications to permit correlation of rock units. Selected ex- 
amples from the past will be examined for these and for paleo- 
ecological and paleoenvironmental interpretations. 

George D. Brown, Jr. 

Ge 270 Petrology I (F; 4) 

Prerequisites: First year of Chemistry, Ge 132, 134, 200 or equiv- 
alent. 

This course has two parts: the principles and theory of polarizing 
microscopy and basic igneous petrology. The first part of the 
course focuses on the basic physics of the interaction of light 
with the crystalline matter and how it can be applied to mineral 
identification using the polarizing microscope. The second part 
of the course covers the basic principles of igneous petrology, 
equilibrium and non-equilibrium crystallization and the use of 
phase diagrams in binary, ternary, and quaternary systems. 

Three hours of lecture per week. Laboratory Ge 271 is 
required. /. Christopher Hepburn 

Rudolph Hon 

Ge 271 Petrology I, Laboratory* (F; 0) 

The laboratory exercises are directly synchronized with Ge 270. 
The student will practice the use of the polarizing microscope 
and will learn how to use it as a tool for identification of rock- 
forming minerals, using the immersion technique as well as the 
thin sections. The petrology and classification of the igneous 
rocks is learned using both hand samples and thin sections. Lab- 



oratory unknowns and problems assigned. Four hours per 
week. /. Christopher Hepburn 

Rudolph Hon 

Ge 272 Petrology II (S; 4) 

Prerequisite: Ge 270 or equivalent 

A continuation of Ge 270. This course is devoted to an under- 
standing of the petrology of sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. 
During the first half of the course the dynamic and geochemical 
factors involved in the formation of sedimentary rocks will be 
explored. The second part of the course is devoted to the study 
of metamorphism including the variables and controls involved 
in the formation of metamorphic rocks. Phase diagrams will be 
used extensively and applications of the phase rule studied. Lab- 
oratory Ge 273 is required. /. Christopher Hepburn 

David C. Roy 

Ge 273 Petrology II, Laboratory* (S; 0) 

Laboratory for Ge 272. The petrology of sedimentary and meta- 
morphic rocks will be examined both in hand sample and in thin 
section utilizing the polarizing microscope. Four hours of labo- 
ratory per week with problem sets and unknowns assigned./. 
Christopher Hepburn David C. Roy 

Ge 285 Structural Geology I:* Field Aspects (F; 4) 

Prerequisite: Ge 132 and 134 or equivalent 

This course is oriented toward the solving of geological structures 
by field exercises and problem sets, emphasizing descriptive and 
geometrical aspects. Three hours of lecture and one 2 hour prob- 
lem solving/laboratory session per week and six Saturday sessions 
in the field. James W. Skehan, S.J. 

Ge 290 Structural Geology II, Analytical Aspects* (S; 4) 

Prerequisites: Ge 132 and 134, Mt 100 and Mt 101, Ph 209, or 
equivalents. 

Quantitative and tectonic aspects of fracture, folding, faulting, 
and igneous intrusion will be treated. The analyses will be made 
utilizing geologic and geophysical constraints deduced from well- 
documented field examples, such as the U.S.G.S. Rangely Oil 
Field study and the Heart Mountain detachment fault system. To 
achieve these objectives, the analyses first will be made of stress, 
strain, and the elastic, brittle, ductile, and creep behavior of rock. 
Three hours of lecture and one discussion-problem session lab 
per week. E. G. Rombolakis 

Ge 292 Reading and Research in Geology (F, S; 3, 3) 

A study of some problem or area of knowledge in geology. 

The Department 

Ge 293 Reading and Research in Geophysics (F, S; 3, 3) 

A study of some problem or area of knowledge in geophysics. 

The Department 

Ge 296 Reading and Research in Oceanography (F, S; 3, 3) 

The Department 

Ge 302 Geochemistry (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: College Chemistry, Ge 200, or equivalent. 
An introduction to fundamentals of geochemical processes and 
how they influence distribution of elements in the natural en- 
vironment. The subjects which will be discussed will include 
nucleosynthesis, isotope geology, water chemistry and chemical 
changes during formation of sedimentary, metamorphic and ig- 
neous rocks. 
Will be offered alternate years. Not offered 1982-83. 

Rudolph Hon 

Ge 330 Principles of Paleontology* (F; 4) 

Prerequisite: Ge 132, 134 or equivalent, or permission of the in- 
structor. 

An introduction to the study of animal life of the past. Consid- 
eration is given to the concept of species, especially the problems 
of taxonomy of individuals and of populations. Living represen- 
tatives of the various phyla are compared with fossil forms to 
offer evidence regarding mode of life, evolutionary development, 
and ecological environment. George D. Brown, Jr. 

Ge 350 Regional Geology of North America (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 132-134, 285 or equivalent 



46 / Arts and Sciences 

GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS 



A systematic investigation of the physiography, stratigraphy, 
structural geology, petrology, and distribution of the major geo- 
logical provinces of North America. Readings, oral and written 
reports. 
Not offered 1982-83. George D. Brown, Jr. 

Ge 391 Introduction to Geophysics (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 132, 134; Mt 200-201; Ph 211-212 

An introduction to the methods of observation and interpretation 

of geophysical phenomena. Topics include: seismology, gravity 

and magnetic fields, age determinations, heat flow, and tectonic 

forces. 

John E. Ebel 

Ge 400 Geology/Geophysics Honors (F, S; 3, 3) or (F, S; 4, 4) 

Independent research undertaken by a student who qualifies, 
under the direction of an advisor. The Department 

Ge 450-^52 Exploration Geophysics I and II (F, S; 4, 4) 

Prerequisites: Ge 132, Mt 200-201, Ph 211-212 
A practical course in geophysical exploration methods; emphasis 
is on applications to petroleum and mineral exploration and 
geoengineering work. Part I covers seismic refraction and reflec- 
tion methods and emphasizes modern techniques and applica- 
tions. Part II covers gravity, and electrical methods and their 
theory, instrumentation, data reduction, and interpretation. 

Second semester may be taken without first semester by per- 
mission of instructor. Three hours of lecture and one problem/ 
discussion session per week. John F. Devane, S.J. 

Ge 460 Modern Sedimentary Environments (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 132, 134, 200, 264 or equivalents 
The course consists of examining the basis for interpreting sed- 
imentary deposits in terms of processes, environments of depo- 
sition, succession of strata and sedimentary tectonics. The 
depositional environments to be studied will include deserts, 
rivers, lakes, glaciers, coasts (deltas, beaches), and marine (coral 
reefs, continental shelf and pelagic deposits). 
Not offered 1982-83. Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 

Ge 470 Ancient Sedimentary Environments (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 132, 134, 264, 272 or equivalents 
Ancient sedimentary deposits will be examined to reconstruct 
depositional environments using physical, chemical, and pa- 
leontological evidences preserved in the rocks. Handspecimen, 
outcrop, stratigraphic sequence, and other criteria will be used 
to determine lateral and vertical facies, environmental relation- 
ships, sedimentary processes, and tectonics. Though intended 
primarily to reconstruct the stratigraphic record, the analyses will 
serve as a basis for the determination of regional geologic settings 
and to assist in the exploration and exploitation of natural re- 
sources. 
Not offered 1982-83. George D. Brown, Jr. 

Ge 485 Instrumental Techniques in Geology (F; 4) 

Prerequisite: One year Chemistry, Ge 200, 272. 
This course is designed to introduce students to the theory, prin- 
ciples of operation and instrumentation of all common instru- 
mental techniques presently used in geological research. These 
will include x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, atomic absorp- 
tion, absorptiometry, electron microscope techniques, neutron 
activation, emission spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. There 
will be laboratory exercises making use of x-ray diffraction, 
atomic absorption and neutron activation instrumentation. 
Will be offered alternate years. Not offered 1982-83. 

Rudolph Hon 

Ge 500 Potential Field Theory (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Mt 300-301; Ph 211-212 

This course will study the vector integral theorems of Gauss, 

Stokes and Green. In addition, potential methods of solving La- 



place, Poisson, diffusion and wave equations under appropriate 

geophysical conditions will be considered. 

Not offered 1982-83. John F. Devane, S.J. 

Ge 505 Micropaleontology* (S; 4) 

Prerequisite: Ge 330 

An introduction to the study of very small but geologically im- 
portant taxa of the plant and animal kingdoms. Groups studied 
will include the Foraminifera, Ostracoda, Conodonts, Bryozoa, 
and Diatoms. Three hours of lecture and one laboratory per 
week. George D. Brown, Jr. 

Ge 520 Sedimentary Petrology* (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 132, 134, 264, 272 

The petrography and origin of the major sedimentary rock types 
will be emphasized. The use of mineral and chemical composi- 
tion together with textural and sedimentary analyses to under- 
stand sedimentary provenance and depositional environments 
will be explored in both the lectures and laboratories. 

Offered in alternate years; to be given 1982-83. David C. Roy 

i 

Ge 525 Theory of Mineral Equilibria (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Integral and differential Calculus, Inorganic Chem- 
istry; some knowledge of Thermodynamics is desirable. 

The course consists of 2 interrelated parts. The first part will 
examine basic principles of thermodynamics; (1st, 2nd, and 3rd 
law of thermodynamics) and the theory of solution and equilibria 
in the chemical system using geological examples. During the 
second part the same principles will be used in understanding 
metamorphic reactions and silicate melt-crystal equilibria with 
special emphasis on geothermometry and geobarometry. 
Offered in alternate years; to be given 1982-83. Rudolph Hon 

Ge 526 Igneous Petrology (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 272, 525 or equivalent 

The origin and evolution of igneous rocks in the light of exper- 
imental and petrographic evidence. Introduction to the principles 
of phase equilibria. 
Offered in alternate years; to be given 1982-83. Rudolph Hon 

Ge 528 Metamorphic Petrology (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 272 or equivalent, Ge 525 recommended 
The nature and origin of rocks that formed by metamorphism 
from pre-existing rocks. Topics will include the interpretation of 
mineral assemblages, their phase relations, and the pressure-tem- 
perature regimes of metamorphism 
Offered alternate years; not offered 1982-83. 

/. Christopher Hepburn 

Ge 530 Marine Geology (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 132, 272 

Recent geological, geophysical and geochemical information on 
the ocean basins is examined. Emphases are placed on modern 
sedimentation and deformation dynamics, and ocean basin his- 
tory revealed by cored and dredged sediments and igneous rocks, 
together with seismologic, gravity, heatflow, and magnetic data. 
Offered in alternate years; to be given 1982-83. 

Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 

Ge 539 Coastal Geology (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 132, 134, Mt 200-201, Ph 211-212 and Ge 
450—452 or equivalent 

Processes of deposition and erosion of the world's coastline. Top- 
ics to be considered are classification of shorelines; sea level 
changes; beach, paludal, deltaic, evaporite and carbonate envi- 
ronments. Special attention is given to shallow water hydrody- 
namics. 
Offered alternate years; not offered 1982-83. 

Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 

Ge 542 Engineering Geology I (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ph 209 and Structural Geology I or equivalents 
Emphasis will be given to analysis of problems frequently en- 
countered in the engineering geology of sediments. The problems 
will include basic processes affecting the mechanical behavior 



Arts and Sciences / 47 

GERMANIC STUDIES 



of sediments, time-dependent ground settlement, slope stability, 

and landslides. 

Not offered 1982-83. E. G. Bombolakis 

Ge 547 Advanced Structural Geology (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

The emphasis will be on basic problems of structural geology, 
utilizing stress-strain relations. These problems will be analyzed 
with respect to well-documented field examples in Californa and 
several other key areas of the Cordillera. The basic problems in- 
clude faulting mechanisms and the development of over-thrusts, 
detachment faults, and drape folds. 

Three hours of lecture per week. Offered alternate years; to be 
given in 1982-83. E. G. Bombolakis 

Ge 548 Geomechanics (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

The principles of rock deformation will be emphasized, with 

recent studies of geomechanics problems incorporated in the 

analysis. 

Not offered in 1982-83. E. G. Bombolakis 

Ge 550 Geostatistics (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 115, 125 or equivalents; Computer Programming 

recommended 

Practical approach to statistical and probabilistic procedures for 

the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of geologic and ecol- 

ogic data. Introduction to mathematical models of gaussian and 

non-normal populations. 

Not offered 1982-83. Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 

Ge 572 Geophysical Data Processing (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ge 391, Computer Programming 
The techniques of convolution, correlation and spectral analysis 
are applied to seismic, magnetic and gravity data, with emphasis 
on the theory and construction of two-dimensional filters in the 
interpretation of gravity and aeromagnetic data. 

John F. Devane, S.J. 

Ge 610 Physical Sedimentation* (F; 4) 

Prerequisites: Ge 132, 134, 264, 272; Mt 100-101; Ph 211 
A study of the physical dynamics of erosion, transport, and dep- 
osition of particulate materials in fluid media. Experimental and 
empirical data on both channelized and nonchannelized flow 
systems will be examined. Special attention will be given to sed- 
imentary structures and their hydrodynamic interpretations. 
Three hours of lecture per week. Laboratory Ge 611 required. 
Offered in alternate years; not offered 1982-83. David C. Boy 

Ge 611 Physical Sedimentation Laboratory (F; 0) 

Ge 650 Regional Stratigraphy of the Northern Appalachians 
(F;3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 264, 272, 285 or equivalent 
This course emphasizes the application of principles of paleon- 
tology, stratigraphy and sedimentation to this important moun- 
tain system consisting in part of unfossiliferous, metamorphic 
layered rocks correlated with those bearing fossils. A research 
project on a region within the Northern Appalachians is required 
of each student. 
Not offered 1982-1983. David C. Boy 

Ge 655 Regional Tectonics of the Northern Appalachians (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 264, 272, 285 or equivalent 
This course emphasizes the application of principles of structural 
geology, igneous and metamorphic petrology to this multi-de- 
formed mountain system. A research project is required. 
Not offered 1982-83. James W. Skehan, S.J. 

Ge 660 Introduction to Seismology (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 391, Mt 300-301 or equivalent 
A basic course in seismology, including seismograph calibration, 
ray theory, body and surface waves, location, magnitude and in- 
tensity. Also discussed are seismicity, energy release, mecha- 
nisms, and fault-plane solutions. John E. Ebel 

Ge 661 Theoretical Seismology (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ph 480, Ge 660 or equivalent 

An advanced course in seismology. Elasticity and development 

of the wave equations, reflection and refraction, energy parti- 



tioning, inversion of body wave data and dislocation theory of 
earthquakes. John E. EbeJ 

Ge 662 Geomagnetism (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ge 391, Ge 500 

Analysis of the Earth's magnetic field in space and time. Origin 
of the field; secular variation; magnetic storms; micropulsations; 
electrical conductivity of the Earth; paleomagnetism and its re- 
lationship to theories of global tectonics. John F. Devane, S.J. 

Ge 663 Gravity Fields (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ph 480 or equivalent 

Derivation of theoretical gravity formulas, geoidal heights, anom- 
alistic gravity reductions, two- and three-dimensional modelling, 
and satellite geodesy. 
Not offered 1982-83. The Department 

Ge 672 Physics of the Earth (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

An advanced course covering the solar system, radioactive age 
dating, the earth's rotation, gravity, seismicity, thermal proper- 
ties, geomagnetism and tectonics. The Department 



Germanic Studies 



Faculty 



Professor Emeritus Heinz Bluhm, A.B., Northwestern College; 
A.M., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Associate Professor Christoph Eykman, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment 
Ph.D., Rhein, Friedr. Wilhelm Universitat, Bonn 

Adjunct Associate Professor W. Michael Resler, A.B., William and 
Mary College; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor Gert Bruhn, A.B., University of British Colum- 
bia; A.M., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Special Lecturer Valda Melngailis, A.B., A.M., Boston University; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 



Program Description 

The major in Germanic Studies is designed to give the student 
an active command of the German language, an insight into Ger- 
man literature and culture, and to provide the background for 
graduate study in the field. 

Students majoring in Germanic Studies are required to com- 
plete a total of 12 courses within the following curriculum: 

1) Composition and Conversation (2) 

2) History of German Literature (2) 

3) Four semester courses in German literature or culture (4) 

4) Two semester courses in subjects related to German culture 
such as the following: Diirer and His Contemporaries (Fa 
341), Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich (Hs 143), Rise of 
Modern Germany 1815-Present (Hs 441-442), Nietzsche — 
Prophet of Nihilism (PI 421), Philosophy of Karl Jaspers (PI 
431), German Existentialism (PI 458), Marx and Weber: The 
Origins of Society (PI 509). Other courses of this nature can 
be taken subject to the approval of the department. (2) 

5) Two electives either in German literature (in German or in 
English translation), or in a second foreign language. (2) 

Subject to departmental approval, the Honors Program in Ger- 
man is offered to interested students who maintain a cumulative 
average of at least 3.3 in German. These students are advised to 
begin in the second semester of their junior year, under the di- 
rection of a member of the Department, a research project which 
will lead to an Honors Thesis. 



Course Offerings 

Gm 001-002 German A (Elementary) (F, S; 3, 3) 

The fundamentals of German grammar and vocabulary. Practice 



48 / Arts and Sciences 

HISTORY 



in listening comprehension and speaking in everyday situations. 
Exercises in reading and in elementary German composition. 

The Department 

Gm 003-004 German R (Elementary Reading German) 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

An introduction to German designed to develop reading and 
translating skills: recognition of grammatical patterns, passive 
vocabulary building, and German syntax. This is a course geared 
to students who wish to achieve a reading proficiency either in 
the Humanities or the Sciences. 
Not offered 1982-83 The Department 

Gm 005-006 German M (Elementary Business) (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is especially designed for SOM students who want 
to enrich their program by acquiring the basic skills of reading, 
writing (correspondence), speaking, and listening-comprehen- 
sion in German in areas such as International Business, Market- 
ing, Finance (incl. Banking), Operations Management, and other 
relevant fields. 
No previous German is required. Christoph Eykman 

Gm 050-051 Intermediate German (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Gm 001-002, or its equivalent 

Further training in active use of the language, with emphasis on 
reading and conversation. Readings in 20th century German 
prose, fiction, and non-fiction. German culture and society. Gram- 
mar review. Discussion and composition. The Department 

Gm 175-176 Highlights of German Culture (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Gm 050-051, or its equivalent 

The cultural and artistic achievements of German-speaking Eu- 
rope from the Middle Ages to the present. Their relation to the 
major trends and movements in German literature. 
Not offered 1982-83 Valda Melngailis 

Gm 199 Intensive Reading Course in German (F; 0) 

The course prepares the student for either a graduate language 
reading examination or the standardized Princeton type of test 
and provides him or her with the ability to read general or spec- 
ialized material in his or her own as well as related major fields. 
Note: No previous German is required for this course. 

The Department 

Gm 201-202 German Composition and Conversation (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Gm 050-051, or its equivalent 

This course is designed to improve fluency in spoken German. 
Short compositions will be written periodically. Course work also 
includes review of selected difficult areas of grammar (with ex- 
ercises), systematic vocabulary building, listening comprehen- 
sion, reading and discussion of newspaper articles, plays, and 
other texts dealing with current aspects of life in modern Ger- 
many. 
A required course for German majors. Christoph Eykman 

Gm 210-211 History of German Literature (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Gm 050—051 (with an honor grade), or its equivalent. 
An introduction to the study of German literature. Selected texts 
from the Middle Ages to the 20th century will be analyzed against 
the background of historical events and European literary move- 
ments. 
A required course for German majors. Valda Melngailis 

Gm 220 Goethe and Schiller (F; 3) 

A study of selected dramas and lyrics of Goethe and Schiller. The 
development on the part of both poets from early Storm and Stress 
to the later Classicism will be systematically traced. Throughout 
the course, the literature will be linked to the larger cultural 
context of its age, with particular attention to the philosophical 
(Herder, Kant, Hegel) and musical (Mozart, Beethoven) heritage 
of Germany in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. 
Lectures and readings are in German. Discussions, paper and 
exams are in English or German. Michael Resler 

Gm 239 German Literature of the High Middle Ages (S; 3) 

A study of the masterpieces of the first great blossoming in Ger- 
man literature. Central to the works of this age (all to be read in 
English translation) are (1) the rise of knighthood and (2) the 



spreading to Germany of the legend of King Arthur and the 
knights of the Round Table. In addition, older Germanic-heroic 
influences can still be detected in some of the works. The liter- 
ature will be discussed in the larger context of its sociological 
and historical background (paganism vs. Christianity, the Cru- 
sades, conflict with the papacy, etc.). The literary traditions of 
France and England will be systematically linked to contempo- 
rary developments in Germany. 
Conducted in English Michael Resler 

Gm 242 Germany, East and West: The Contemporary Scene 

(F; 3) 

A multi-dimensional look at post-war Germany, East and West. 
Politics, social structure, music, art, literature, philosophy, the 
crisis and reform of the West German university system, the 
young generation, Americanization, and other topics. 
Conducted in English. Christoph Eykman 

Gm 271 Thomas Mann (S; 3) 

A study of Mann's craft of fiction and his contribution to the 
modern German novel. Topics to be discussed: art, politics, and 
the daemonic; romanticism and realism; decadence and progress; 
Germany as a theme in Mann's novels and essays; the influence 
of Goethe, Wagner, and Nietzsche. Readings include: Tonio 
Kroger, Der Tod in Venedig, Der Zauberberg, and Doktor 
Faustus. Gert Bruhn 

Gm 280 Goethe's Faust I (F; 3) 

An interpretation of the First Part of Goethe's Faust, one of the 
masterpieces of world literature. The Faust theme in European 
literature before and after Goethe. The intellectual background 
of German Storm and Stress and Classicism: Herder, Kant, 
Nietzsche, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert. Faust seen in the larger 
context of Goethe's general view of life. 
Conducted in English Heinz Bluhm 

Gm 281 Goethe's Faust II (S; 3) 

An interpretation of the Second Part of Goethe's Faust, one of the 
masterpieces of world literature. The Faust theme in European 
literature before and after Goethe. The intellectual background 
of German Classicism and Romanticism: Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, 
Beethoven, Schumann. Faust seen in the larger context of 
Goethe's general view of life. 
Conducted in English Heinz Bluhm 

Gm 299 Reading and Research 

Supervised reading within specific areas, for the solution of in- 
dividual problems of research. This course may be taken only 
with permission of the chairperson. 
By arrangement The Department 



History 



Faculty 

Professor Andrew Buni, A. B., A.M., University of New Hampshire; 
Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Professor William M. Daly, A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., 
Brown University 

Professor John L. Heineman, A.B., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., 
Cornell University 

Professor Janet W. James, A.B., Smith; A.M., Bryn Mawr; Ph.D., 
Harvard 

Professor Raymond T. McNally, A.B., Fordham University; Ph.D., 
Free University of Berlin 

Professor Samuel J. Miller, B.S., A.M., Ohio State University; 
Ph.D., Brown University 

Professor Thomas H. O'Connor, A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., 
Boston University 

Professor John R. Willis, S.J., A.B., Amherst College; B.D., Hartford 
Seminary; Ph.D., Yale University 



Arts and Sciences / 49 

HISTORY 



Professor Silas H. L. Wu, A.B., National Taiwan University; A.B., 
University of California at Berkeley; A.M., Yale University; Ph.D., 
Columbia University 

Associate Professor Paul Breines, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin 

Associate Professor Joseph T. Criscenti, A.B., University of Detroit; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Radu R. Florescu, A.B., A.M., B.Litt., Oxford 
University; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Associate Professor Mark I. Gelfand, A.B., City College of New 
York; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Associate Professor R. Alan Lawson, A.B., Brown University; A.M., 
University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Associate Professor Roberta Manning, A.B., Rice College; A.M., 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Associate Professor Rev. Francis J. Murphy, A.B., Holy Cross; A.M., 
Ph.D., Catholic University 

Professor David A. Northrup, Assistant Chairman of the Depart- 
ment 

B.S., M.A., Fordham University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Cal- 
ifornia, Los Angeles 

Associate Professor Thomas W. Perry, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Associate Professor Carol M. Petillo, A.B., Montclair State College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Associate Professor Alan Reinerman, B.S., A.M., Xavier University; 
Ph.D., Loyola University 

Associate Professor Alan Rogers, Chairman of the Department 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara 

Associate Professor John H. Rosser, A.B., University of Maryland; 
A.M., Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Associate Professor Paul G. Spagnoli, A.B., Holy Cross; A.M., Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

Associate Professor L. Scott Van Doren, A.B., Oberlin College; A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Peter H. Weiler, A.B., Stanford University; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor Benjamin Braude, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Assistant Professor Ellen G. Friedman, A.B., New York University; 
Ph.D., City University 

Assistant Professor Joseph A. Glavin, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston Col- 
lege; S.T.B., Weston College 

Assistant Professor Thomas J. Grey, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
A.M., Georgetown University; S.T.L., Weston College 

Assistant Professor Sandra R. Joshel, A.B., Skidmore College; A.M., 
Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Assistant Professor Leonard P. Mahoney, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston 
College; A.M., Ph.L., S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., Georgetown 
University 

Assistant Professor Kevin O'Neill, A.B., Marquette University; 
A.M., Loyola University; Ph.D., Brown University 

Assistant Professor Judith E. Smith, B.A., Radcliffe College; M.A., 
Ph.D., Brown University 



Program Description 

The Department of History offers the undergraduate student a 
variety of courses in Ancient, Medieval European, Early Modern 
and Modern European, Russian, East European, United States, 
Latin American, Asian, Middle East, and African History. Careful 
planning, with the advice of faculty members, can provide the 
student with a sequence of courses which will prepare him or 
her for the fields of law, government, and the foreign service, and 



for a career in various international organizations, in journalism, 
or in teaching at the elementary, secondary, or college levels. 

A history major is required to take a two-semester sequence in 
European Civilization since the Renaissance (selection from any 
course Hs 001-002 through Hs 093-94), and a two-semester se- 
quence in American Civilization (Hs 181-182). Students planning 
to concentrate in history are encouraged to take European Civi- 
lization in their freshman year, and American Civilization in their 
sophomore year. Once they have fulfilled these requirements they 
will have acquired the prerequisite for most elective courses in 
junior and senior years. Beginning students who have advanced 
placement or who have successfully passed the departmental 
qualifying examinations, offered annually in the fall, may sub- 
stitute an upper-division course in European or American history 
for these required courses. 

In addition to the prescribed courses listed above the history 
major will be required to complete 8 courses in upper division 
electives in history, including at least 2 courses in some field of 
history either before 1500 or Non-Western. Upper division 
courses are listed in two categories: intermediate (Hs 150 through 
Hs 299) and advanced (Hs 300 through 699). 

In order to assure a well-balanced program, no more than 4 
upper division courses may be earned in any single field. For this 
purpose the fields are identified as: Ancient, Medieval, Modern 
Europe, East European and Russian, United States, Latin America, 
and the Third World. 

Within the general context described above, a history major 
may choose to pursue a specialized program in Irish Studies. The 
program offers a junior year in Irish Studies at University College, 
Cork, which provides intensive exposure in areas of Irish culture 
not normally available in the United States, such as Irish eth- 
nography, folklore, and anthropology. Interested students should 
apply to the Junior Year Abroad office or see Professors Dalsimer 
and O'Neill of the English and History Departments. 

In order to facilitate the introduction of research techniques 
the department offers a variety of Readings and Research oppor- 
tunities. These projects must be arranged between the individual 
student and professor, and then receive the permission of the 
departmental chairperson. No more than 2 courses completed in 
this fashion will count toward the history major degree. 



Core 



The University CORE Requirement is a two-semester sequence 
in Modern European History (1500 to the present). All History 
courses numbered between Hs 001-002 and 093-094 fulfill this 
requirement. All of these courses have distinctive emphases, re- 
flecting the interests and expertise of the instructors, and wher- 
ever possible they have been given specific titles which describe 
these emphases. Nevertheless, with the exception of Hs 091-092 
(which is described below), all courses cover the following topics. 

First Semester: The Renaissance, the Reformation, and the 
Counter-Reformation; exploration and overseas trade; the social 
structure of early modern Europe; the development of the bu- 
reaucratic state; international relations and warfare; the scientific 
revolution and the Enlightenment; the development of capitalism 
and the origins of the Industrial Revoution; the revolutions in 
seventeenth-century England and eighteenth-century France. 

Second Semester: Napoleon; the Congress of Vienna; nine- 
teenth-century conservative and liberal political theories; nation- 
alism, the unification of Italy, and German unification; Marx and 
Darwin and their influences on modern thought; the development 
of modern industry; imperialism and colonialism; international 
relations, World War I, and the Russian Revolution; Fascism and 
the Depression; World War II; postwar Europe. 

Hs 083 and 084 cover these topics in reversed sequence and 
are intended primarily for students who need to begin or complete 
their history CORE requirement out of turn. 



50 / Arts and Sciences 

HISTORY 



Course Offerings 

Specific CORE Courses Are: 

Hs 001-002 Cul and Inst Hs of Mod Europe (F, S; 3, 3) 

Dept/Heineman 

Hs 005-006 Soc and Econ Development of Mod Europe 

(F, S; 3, 3) Van Doren/SpagnoJi 



Hs 009-010 Honors Survey European History (F, S; 3, 3) 



Miller 



Hs 011-012 Pol and Soc Hs Mod Europe (F, S; 3, 3) 

Dept/McNally 



Hs 015-016 Cul Hs Mod Europe (F, S; 3, 3) 



Murphy 



Hs 019-020 Pol and Int Hs Mod Europe (F, S; 3, 3) 

Joshel/O'Neill 

Hs 023-024 Soc and Cul Hs Mod Europe (F, S; 3, 3) 

Weiler/Breines 

Hs 027-028 Pol and Cul Hs Mod Europe (F, S; 3, 3) 

Reinerman/Dept 

Hs 039-040 Foundation of the Mod State (F, S; 3, 3) 

Miller/Dept 

Hs 045-046 European Soc and Pol Evolution (F, S; 3, 3) 

Friedman/Dept 

Hs 051-052 The West and the World (F, S; 3, 3) 

Rogers/Northrup 

Hs 059-060 The Rise of Europe: East and West since 1500 

(F, S; 3, 3) Rosser/Braude 

Hs 081 Modern Europe, 1500-1789 (F; 3) The Department 

Hs 082 Modern Europe, 1789-Present (S; 3) The Department 

Hs 083 Europe from 1789 to the Present (F; 3) The Department 

Hs 084 Europe from 1500 to 1789 (S; 3) The Department 

Hs 087-088 Europe from 1500 to the Present (F, S; 3, 3) 

This class fulfills the history core requirement; it is given in the 
French language. The course will meet all the requirements and 
cover the same topics as our other history core courses but all 
the lectures, readings and assignments will be in the French lan- 
guage. Students may enroll in this course only with the permis- 
sion of the Romance Languages Department. Radu Florescu 

Hs 091-092 Western Civilization (F, S; 3, 3) 

This two-semester sequence presents a broader survey of Western 
Civilization for those students interested in a study of European 
history from the birth of Christianity to the present. Students who 
begin this sequence may not transfer into any other course for the 
second semester; similarly, students who have begun their core 
in one of the Europe since 1500 courses may not transfer into 
Western Civilization during the second semester. 

Joseph Glavin, S.J. 

Undergraduate Electives for Non-Majors 

All courses above 100 require as a prerequisite the successful 
completion of the University Core (Hs 001-002 through Hs 
098—099). Most of the following electives, though taught as year 
courses, may be taken for one semester only. Students should 
consult the department or the individual professor for advice. 

Hs 106 Conspiracy in American History (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
An analysis of a number of famous incidents at critical periods 
of American History, which have been described by various his- 
torians as the results of deliberate plots or conscious conspiracies. 
Such incidents would include: Sam Adams and the Boston Tea 
Party; Aaron Burr and the Western Conspiracy; James K. Polk and 
the Mexican War; Abraham Lincoln and the attack on Fort Sum- 
ter; Theodore Roosevelt and the assault on Manila Bay; Franklin 



Delano Roosevelt and the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor; the 
assassination of John F. Kennedy; and Lyndon B. Johnson and 
the Vietnam War. Thomas O'Connor 

Hs 115 A Cultural History of the Irish People (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A survey of the last four centuries of Irish History and civilizaton, 
designed for students who want to explore the economic, social, 
and literary evolution of modern Ireland. Kevin O'Neill 

Hs 129 History of Boston (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A survey of Boston from the 1820's to the present as it has changed 
from a town to a city to a metropolitan center. A full range of 
topics will be covered (aided by guest lecturers) including the 
city's physical growth, political conflicts, social structure (im- 
migrant and Brahmin), literary achievements, architectural splen- 
dor, economic growth, social turmoil, and contemporary problems. 
The course will emphasize the traditions and changes that have 
made Boston the influential and exciting place it is and how and 
why the diverse population has responded. Andrew Buni 

Hs 136 Myth and Superstition (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
This course will study the impact of the non-rational beliefs upon 
men and events of each period and examine their causes down 
to the present. Stress will be placed upon the lives and role of 
the more famous astrologists, oracles, chimorancers, sorcerers, 
and alchemists. The causes of manifestations such as witchcraft, 
vampirism and lycanthropy will be examined. A portion of this 
course will be devoted to folkloric beliefs and their historical 
relevance. The literary interpretations of such myths will also be 
included. Radu R. Florescu 

Hs 138 China Today (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
An historical examination of contemporary China, including such 
topics as the reign of Chairman Mao, the cultural revolution and 
the trial of the Gang of Four. Silas Wu 

Hs 147 History of Horror (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
An historical review of the phenomena of horror using film and 
literature. Raymond T. McNally 

Hs 153 History of China (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 

A survey of the major events that shaped the development of 

modern China. Silas Wu 

Hs 154 History of Japan (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A survey of the major events that shaped the development of 
modern Japan. Silas Wu 

Hs 155 (CI 209) History of the Roman Republic (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The course traces the social and political development of the 
Roman Republic from its foundation to the destruction in the 
civil wars of the first century B.C. and will focus on the period 
264-23 B.C. Consideration of the following topics is included in 
this survey: the acquisition of an empire, the nature of Roman 
imperialism, and the social and political description of the first 
century B.C. Sandra Joshel 

Hs 158 (CI 235) History of the Roman Empire (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The course traces the development of imperial power from the 
foundation of the Principate to the fall of Rome. Emphasis will 
be placed on the social, cultural, and political dynamics of the 
first two centuries A.D. Sandra Joshel 

Hs 181-182 American Civilization (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A survey of the political, social, economic, and intellectual de- 
velopments that have shaped and influenced the growth of the 
United States from a colonial appendage to a world power. Based 
upon a sound foundation of the framework of American history 
this course will give students insights into the institutions, so- 
ciety, economy, and ideas upon which American Civilization is 



Arts and Sciences / 51 

HISTORY 



founded. Consideration will be given to continuity, change, and 
conflict in American Society. The Department 

Hs 207 (Th 152) Islamic Civilization in the Middle East 
(F;3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
Islam has been a dominant element in the Middle East since 
Muhammad first preached in Mecca at the beginning of the sev- 
enth century. Muhammad was both prophet and statesman and 
the impact of this joint mission has been felt through the centuries 
down to the Ayatollah Khomeini in our own day. What have been 
the major achievements of this religio-centric culture at the stra- 
tegic cross-roads of Asia, Africa, and Europe? This course seeks 
to answer these and other related questions as it explores the 
relation of Islam to the religions of late antiquity, the religious 
system of Islam, political and military trends, social and eco- 
nomic tensions, and movements for reform and religious revival. 

Benjamin Braude 

Hs 208 Middle East in the Twentieth Century (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semester of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
Through the last eighty years the Middle East has been the site 
of many wars and conflicts. More recently it has become the most 
important source of the world's energy. This combination of strife 
and economic power has made it a vital and sensitive area for 
the entire globe. This course should help you understand the 
origins of the disputes which have arisen in the region and gain 
a sense of how recent history may affect future 
developments. Benjamin Braude 

Hs 212 Introduction to Archaeology (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
This course introduces the goals and techniques of archaeological 
investigation. Topics include the history of archaeology as a 
scholarly discipline, excavation techniques, chronometric dating, 
the present international crisis of site destruction, and the uses 
of computers and quantitative methods. Two sites will be studied 
in detail: the Green Hill site (about 8000 years old) in the Boston 
area and The Castle of the Forty Columns (Crusader, 12th century) 
in Paphos, Cyprus. John flosser 

Hs 221-222 France in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
Beginning with the Revolution, the first semester will go on to 
trace its liquidation by Napoleon and its legacy in the political 
and social movements of the nineteenth century. The story of 
French economic development will be interwoven with the tur- 
bulent political and social history of the succeeding monarchies, 
empires, and republics, and the intervening revolutions of 1830, 
1848, and 1870—71. The semester will conclude with an exami- 
nation of French society at the turn of the twentieth century. In 
the spring semester the focus of the course will center upon twen- 
tieth-century France's changing perception of her own national 
requirements, both domestically and diplomatically. The pro- 
found impact of World War I, the disarray of the interwar years, 
the impact of the Fall of France, Vichy, and the Liberation will 
prepare the way for the study of contemporary France from De 
Gaulle to Mitterand, from declining world power to dynamic 
European Community member. Rev. Francis Murphy 

Paul SpagnoJi 

Hs 245 Jacksonian America (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A study of the development of new political ideologies, changing 
economic and social patterns during the 1830's and 1840's, with 
special emphasis upon New England and the northeast. 

Thomas H. O'Connor 

Hs 248 The American Civil War (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A study of the crisis of the Union, from the close of the Mexican 
War to the end of the Civil War and the beginnings of Recon- 
struction. Special attention will be given to the varied causes 
which brought war about, and to the political and diplomatic 



considerations which influenced the course of the Civil 
War. Thomas H. O'Connor 

Hs 251-252 Twentieth Century America (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
An in-depth study of the major political, economic, and social 
developments which characterized the history of the United 
States from the opening of the twentieth century to the present 
time. Thomas J. Grey, S.J. 

Hs 256 American Constitutional Development (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
An historical analysis of the formation, organization and major 
decisions of the United States Supreme Court from 1788—1977, 
with emphasis upon the Court's relationship to social change. 

Alan Rogers 

Hs 258 Religion in America (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The background and basic beliefs of the major Protestant denom- 
inations, and the rise of the Catholic Church in the U.S.A., Ju- 
daism and Eastern Orthodoxy. Outside speakers are invited to 
discuss their specialties (e.g. Mormons, Christian Scientists, Ad- 
ventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, Pentecostals). John Willis, S.J 

Hs 259 Business in American Life (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
An examination of the interplay between business ideas and prac- 
tices and American society and politics. This is not an economic 
history course, but a study of how the entrepreneurial spirit has 
helped shape the contours of modern America. Among the topics 
to be covered are the continuing tension between the profit motive 
and the sense of commonweal, the rise of corporate structure and 
corporate power, and the role of government. Mark Gel/and 

Hs 264 Anti-Semitism in Modern Europe (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The course will historically investigate the emergence and un- 
folding of anti-Jewish ideas and movements from the late 18th 
century to the present in Europe. It will examine the shifting 
social situations of Jews as well as the larger social changes in 
Europe to which anti-Semitism was in part a response. Relations 
between political, religious, and racial forms of anti-Semitism 
will be studied, as will some of the variety of Jewish responses. 
The course will also look at several historical and psychological 
theories of anti-Semitism, its origins, and enduring influences. 

Paul Breines 

Hs 267 Society and Health Care in America (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The American experience with disease, epidemic and endemic, 
from the arrival of Europeans to the present; development of the 
medical and nursing professions; medicine without doctors: self- 
help, quackery, and faith healing; city life, poverty, and public 
health; the growth of medical research and technology; health 
insurance and health maintenance organizations. 

Janet W. James 

Hs 269-270 European Christian Thought (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A two semester survey of the development of Christian Thought, 
with special emphasis on such major figures as Origen, Augus- 
tine, Aquinas, Occam, Luther, Calvin, Edwards, Schleiermacher, 
the Niebuhrs, C. S. Lewis. John Willis, S.J. 

Hs 273 USSR After Brezhnev: Prospects and Problems (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
Soon the USSR will be experiencing a major change in its gov- 
erning personnel as the Brezhnev generation of leaders who first 
came to the political fore in the late 1930s pass away. What kinds 
of people are likely to succeed Brezhnev in high office? How are 
they likely to relate to one another and the outside world? What 
sorts of political problems and policy decisions await them? We 
will attempt to answer these and other questions by reviewing 
the achievements and shortcomings of the Brezhnev era and ex- 
amining current Soviet policy debates in a number of key areas, 
like foreign policy and disarmament, relations to third world 
revolution, energy policies, environmental politics, the woman 
question, the impact of the high tech revolution (and its impli- 



52 / Arts and Sciences 

HISTORY 



cations for the Soviet economic system), the decline of dissent 
and its causes, cultural policies in the eighties, the lingering prob- 
lems of agriculture, growing up in the USSR, national minorities, 
the role of Soviet trade unions (or is a Polish style crisis likely) 
and the issue of centralization or decentralization in the political 
and economic spheres. Students should feel free to suggest other 
topics and attempt to shape this course to suit their interests and 
needs. Readings will consist of scholarly monographs and articles 
and excerpts from the Soviet press in translation. Students will 
be required to write a 15 to 20 page paper analyzing current Soviet 
policy debates in an area of particular interest to them (placing 
these debates in their proper historical context) and to lead a 
class discussion on the topic selected. Roberta Manning 

Hs 277 Contemporary Europe (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098 
This course will examine the "New Europe" which has emerged 
from the ruins of World War II. Special emphasis will be placed 
on the vision of Europe developed in the Resistance, the impact 
of the Cold War, the economic recovery, and the building of the 
Common Market, decolonization, the new prosperity, Eurocom- 
munism and the relations of Europe with the non-European 
world. Rev. Francis Murphy 

Hs 283-284 Afro-American History (F, 3; S, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A study of the experiences of the blacks in America, this two- 
semester survey will begin with an examination of slavery in 
Africa and in the first semester continue through the Civil War. 
The second semester will investigate the development of Afro- 
American culture and the role of blacks from the Civil War to the 
present day. This course is designed primarily for non- 
majors. To Be Announced 

Hs 297 Women in Russian History and Culture (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A survey of the history of women in Russia from the ancient 
warrior maidens to the present day, concentrating heavily on the 
revolutionary movement and the Soviet period. An attempt will 
be made to assess the impact of social-economic structures, folk- 
loric traditions, political ideology, religion, family organization, 
peasant value-systems, and literary trends on the evolving posi- 
tion of women. 

No prior knowledge of Russian history or culture is assumed. 

Roberta T. Manning 

Hs 299 Readings and Reseach: Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of Professor and Chairperson. 
Students who wish to pursue a semester of directed readings with 
individual faculty members under this category must secure the 
permission of the faculty member and the chairperson. Lists of 
faculty members available for such courses can be obtained from 
the department at the start of every semester. The Department 

Advanced Electives 

Hs 301 Modern China (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
China's social, political, and economic institutions and Western 
impact during the Ch'ing period (1644-1911). SiJas Wu 

Hs 311 The Atlantic Slave Trade (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
From the sixteenth century to the mid-nineteenth the trade in 
slaves across the Atlantic Ocean linked European commercial 
capitalism with the New World demand for plantation labor and 
the African demand for foreign goods. This course examines the 
origins, evolution, and suppression of this nefarious trade as well 
as its economic, social, and moral effects. European, African and 
American aspects of the trade are all considered. 

David Northrup 

Hs 314 Modern Southern Africa (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
Conflicts between Africans and European settlers in southern 
Africa have deep historical roots. Beginning with the first en- 
counters between European and African societies, the course ex- 
amines the expansion of European dominance, the politics and 



economics of racial inequality, and the resulting African protest 
movements and guerrilla warfare. The course covers South Africa, 
Angola, Mozambique, and Zimbabwe with an emphasis on the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. David Northrup 

Hs 315 Christians and Jews under Islam: Nation-Building and 
Religion in the Middle East (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098, plus 
any two semesters of Middle Eastern History 
Over the past centuries nationalism has seemed to replace religio- 
centric notions of community in the Middle East. In some in- 
stances religion is used to promote loyalty to the nation while in 
others it seems at war with it. How have the past experiences of 
Christians and Jews living under Islam affected their response to 
this transformation? Related topics include: tolerance and intol- 
erance in Islam, Ottoman policies toward non-Muslims, confes- 
sionalism in Lebanon and minorities in the Arab 
world. Benjamin Braude 

Hs 320 Epidemic Disease in Early Modern Europe (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
This course will deal with the appearance, spread, and impact 
of epidemics — and especially of plague — in early modern Europe. 
We shall consider the effects of epidemics on the economy, de- 
mography, social relationships, popular attitudes, religion, and 
institutions of the period. We shall also study the way in which 
civil and ecclesiastical authorities attempted to cope with these 
health emergencies and medical and popular interpretations of 
epidemics. EJJen Friedman 

Hs 326 History of Modern Iran (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
An analysis of the trends and transformations in the political, 
social and cultural history of Iran from the mid-nineteenth cen- 
tury to the present. Major topics to be covered include the chang- 
ing relations between Iran and the Western powers, the 
Constitutional Revolution of 1905-1911, the transition from the 
Qajars to the Pahlavi dynasty, Iran's experience as a modernizing 
state, and the cultural roots and the social-structural causes of 
the 1978-1979 revolution. Ali Banuazizi 

Hs 337 The Late Roman Empire (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
This is the first of a two-semester course on the Roman Empire 
from 284-1453. 

The first semester covers the following topics: the reforms of 
Diocletian, the Germanic invasions, the expansion of Islam, the 
reign of Justinian and Theodora, the rise and function of the holy 
man, and the theological controversies of the 4th and 5th cen- 
turies. One central theme is explored, namely the transformation 
of the Roman Empire into a Christian state with its capital trans- 
ferred from Rome to Constantinople. John Rosser 

Hs 338 The Byzantine Empire (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The "Byzantine Empire" is how many modern scholars refer to 
the medieval Roman Empire from about 660 to the fall of Con- 
stantinople to the Ottoman Turks in 1453. This semester is a 
continuation of Hs 337 and deals with a Roman Empire shorn of 
its western provinces and Greek in its language. The central theme 
of the course is the growing separation of East and West, due in 
part to the issue of papal primacy and to the invasions of Slavs 
and Muslims. This set the stage for the tragic confrontation during 
the Crusades when in 1204 Latin knights conquered Constanti- 
nople, an event which so weakened the Roman Empire and so 
poisoned East-West relations as to make the subsequent Turkish 
expansion relatively easy. John Rosser 

Hs 367 (Rl 367) Spanish History: From the Reconquest through 
the Golden Age (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
This course will deal with the period from the reconquest of the 
Iberian peninsula from the Muslins through the seventeenth cen- 
tury, from the "open" and diverse society that was unique to 
Spain in the middle ages, to the "closed" society of the seven- 
teenth century. Emphasis will be placed on the social, economic, 
and political patterns that emerged from the reconquest and the 
problem of why and how many of these patterns were altered 



Arts and Sciences / 53 

HISTORY 



during the subsequent period, the age of Spain's greatness. Among 
topics to be studied are: the free society of the medieval moving 
frontier; the changing role and position of Spain's religious and 
racial minorities, the Jews and Muslims; the Inquisition; Spain's 
emergence as a world power and its effect on the nation's society 
and economy; the church and religious life; criminals, social out- 
casts, the poor, etc. Because the literature of the period frequently 
mirrored contemporary society, when available and appropriate 
it will be utilized as source material. Ellen G. Friedman 

Hs 368 (Rl 368) Modern Spain: From the Eighteenth Century to 
the Present (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
This course will deal with Spanish history from the eighteenth 
century, through the Franco dictatorship, and up to the new dem- 
ocratic system of the present day. The emphasis will be on the 
emergence of "two Spains" — the old, traditional Spain, opposed 
to change, and the "new Spain," that first seeks moderate change 
on a European model, but later turns to radicalism — and the con- 
flict between them. We will examine various movements on the 
right and the left, including, but not limited to, liberalism, so- 
cialism, anarchism, Carlism, and falangism, as well as phenom- 
ena such as regionalism, anti-clericalism, and working-class 
unrest. Ellen Friedman 

Hs 408 Europe in the 18th Century (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A study of the major political trends of the 18th century, with 
particular emphasis on the traditional monarchy of France, En- 
lightened Despotism, and the intellectual currents of the 
Enlightenment. Samuel Miller 

Hs 417 (En 500) Politics and Literature of Irish Independence 
1845-1922 (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
This course will examine the interaction of politics and literature 
during the crucial stages of the movement for Irish Independence. 
It will pay particular attention to the development of political 
and literary attitudes and the relationships between such atti- 
tudes and objective historical reality. It will draw upon literary 
and historical readings and lectures in an attempt to integrate the 
two disciplines and achieve a more sophisticated understanding 
of Irish culture. 

This course is taught jointly and cross-registered with the Eng- 
lish Department. Adele Dalsimer 

Kevin O'Neill 

Hs 421-422 Modern England (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites - Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
Though beginning with a survey of the medieval background, the 
course will deal primarily with the period from 1485 to the pres- 
ent. Emphasis on politics and constitutional history, but with 
attention also to social, and intellectual developments. 

Thomas W. Perry 

Hs 425 (En 361) The Victorian World (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
By combining readings in history and Victorian novels, this 
course aims at building a picture of the dramatic changes in social 
organization and social attitudes that accompanied the process 
of urbanization and industrialization in 19th century England. 
We will focus especially on the complex and changing mixture 
of stresses that defined Victorian attitudes to social class, poverty, 
work, and the relations between men and women, comparing our 
own understanding of these changes with the Victorians' vision 
of them. Readings will include social history and novels by Aus- 
ten, Bronte, Dickens, Gaskell, Trollope. 

Fiosemarie Bodenheimer 
Peter Weiler 

Hs 430 History of Portugal (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
Principal developments in the history of Portugal, including how 
to win and lose two empires. One semester. Samuel Miller 

Hs 433 Europe 1871-1914 (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
Surveys the development of Europe during the long period of 
peace, prosperity, and world domination that was terminated by 



World War I. Particular stress will be placed upon: 1) the triumph 
of liberalism, and the challenges it faced from new ideologies 
such as socialism and proto-fascism; 2) the diplomacy of the great 
powers, examined with a particular view to explaining both the 
long peace that marked this era, and its abrupt ending in 1914; 
3) the spread of European world domination; 4) the transforma- 
tion of European culture and society that followed from the in- 
dustrial and scientific progress of the age. Alan Reinerman 

Hs 441-442 Rise of Modern Germany 1815-1945 (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A two-semester survey of the political, cultural, economic, and 
intellectual factors which formed modern Germany. The first se- 
mester will concentrate on the developments from Napoleon's 
conquests to World War I, and will stress the search for unifi- 
cation. The second semester will begin with the Weimar Republic 
and continue through the Nazi Dictatorship. 

John L. Heineman 

Hs 448 Eastern Europe in the 20th Century (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A study of the political experience of the small nations of Eastern 
Europe (Rumania, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria 
and Greece) in the light of the conflict of interest among the Great 
Powers. The first part of the course will cover the creation of 
these nations and their progressive disintegration in the interwar 
years. The second will emphasize the formation and apparent 
disintegration of the Russian satellite system following World 
War II. Radu Florescu 

Hs 453 Russian History Up to the Revolution (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A study of the major cultural and social developments in Russia 
from the formation of the first Russian state to the Bolshevik 
Revolution of 1917. Special emphasis will be placed upon recent 
research concerning select problems in the field of Russian 
history. Raymond T. McNally 

Hs 465—466 Modern European Diplomatic History (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
This two-semester course examines the international relations 
between the major European Powers from the establishment of 
the Concert of Europe in 1814 to the adoption of the diplomatic 
policy of detente in the Cold War. Special emphasis is given to 
the development of international law through treaties. 

Leonard Mahoney, S.J. 

Hs 468 Russian Intellectural History (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
Students interested in a general course in modern Russian history 
should consider Hs 453—454. 

An analysis of the major ideas of the Russian intelligentsia from 
the late 18th Century to the middle of the 20th Century, or in 
other words from Radishchev to Solzhenitsyn. An attempt will 
be made to inter-relate these ideas with concrete social issues of 
the times. Raymond T. McNally 

Hs 469-470 Intellectual History of Modern Europe (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
This one-semester course examines the cultural crises and trans- 
formations in western Europe from the close of the 19th century 
to the present day. Three broad focal points will be pursued: 1) 
the social sources of cultural change — urbanization; new tech- 
nologies; emergence of mass culture and mass movements; war 
and revolution; 2) the changing situations of intellectuals; and 3) 
the philosophical, aesthetic, and social theories that emerged 
from these experiences. Regarding the ideas themselves, empha- 
sis will be placed on the range of assaults on 19th century currents 
and values — liberalism, rationalism, realism, individualism — 
and the range of efforts to constitute new values and orientations. 
Lectures will be balanced by intensive discussions. The assigned 
readings are demanding and rewarding. Paul Breines 

Hs 481 The Rise of Nationalism in Europe (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A study of national sentiments and nationalism at the end of the 
19th century. Particular attention will be placed on the crucial 
irredentist problem (Alsace-Lorraine), the Catalan problem, 



54 / Arts and Sciences 

LINGUISTICS 



Schleswig-Holstein, Transylvania, and Bessarabia, and their role 
in intensifying national tensions on the eve of World War I. 

Radu FJorescu 

Hs 505-506 Westward Movement (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The conquest of the American land mass and the influence of 
geography on the development of American society. 

Joseph T. Criscenti 

Hs 520 Topics in the History of Boston (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
Various topics in the development of the modern city of Boston, 
1880 to the present. Andrew Buni 

Hs 537 U.S. since 1929 (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A study of major political, social, and economic developments 
which characterized the history of the United States since 
1929. Mark Gel/and 

Hs 541-542 American Social and Cultural History (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The development of society in America from the Indian cultures 
encountered by the first Europeans up to 1860, and from 1860 
into the twentieth century. The major topics are immigration; 
economic change and the development of American technology; 
the interaction of ethnic groups; religious diversity; social prob- 
lems and reform movements; women, youth, and the family; and 
popular culture, including entertainment and the arts. 

Janet W. James 

Hs 545-546 American Ideas and Institutions (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
A history of thought as it has developed within the framework 
of American society. The course will compare ideas of several 
distinct kinds: those which have expressed the prevailing ways 
of each period; those which have offered alternatives; and those 
which have sought artistically to mirror dreams and realities. 

R. Alan Lawson 

Hs 565-566 Urbanization of America (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
An analysis of the processes of urban growth and development 
including the social, political and economic impact of urbani- 
zation on the people who lived in cities. To be announced 

Hs 567 American Immigration 1880-1928 (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
An analysis of the people and the politics of the new Eastern 
European Migration, the melting pot, nativism and exclusion. 

Andrew Buni 

Hs 571-572 American Foreign Relations in the Twentieth Cen- 
tury (F, S;3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
U.S. foreign policy has been the result of domestic influences as 
well as a response to international realities. In both semesters, 
this course will focus on the ways home grown interests helped 
to shape the U.S. participation in world affairs. (Fall: 1890-1945; 
Spring: 1945-present). Topics will include studies of leadership, 
power, and tradition, as well as the wars, treaties, and economic 
influences more commonly examined in courses of this 
nature. Carol Petillo 

Hs 591 Colonial Period in Latin America (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The course will begin with an anthropological study of Indian 
cultures in the New World on the eve of discovery and the ad- 
justment of the Indian to the white man, the white man to the 
Indian, and then shift to an examination of Spanish and Portu- 
guese political, economic, and religious institutions transferred 
to the New World, their fate here, and their impact on the for- 
mation of a Latin American civilization. Some reading will be 
done in famous contemporary accounts, but the emphasis will 
be placed on relatively recent scholarly monographs. A knowl- 



edge of Spanish or Portuguese is desirable, but not 
required. Joseph T. Criscenti 

Hs 592 Argentina, Brazil, and Chile (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
The emergence of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile as great powers 
in South America. The lectures will stress political and economic 
developments, and will seek to develop in the student an appre- 
ciation for Latin American culture. Numerous illustrations will 
be based on contemporary developments in Latin America. Some 
attention will also be given to new and old interpretations, either 
Latin American or American. Social and intellectual history will 
be touched upon in the readings. A knowledge of Spanish or 
Portuguese is desirable, but not required. Joseph T. Criscenti 

Undergraduate seminars are normally restricted to juniors and 
seniors who have completed the appropriate course work. Each 
seminar will focus on a particular topic. Students will be required 
to write a research paper. 

Enrollment in these seminars is limited and admission is by 
the permission of the instructor. 



Hs 606 Age of Jackson (S; 3) 



Thomas O'Connor 



Hs 618 Nineteenth-Century Ireland: The Human Crisis (S; 3) 

Kevin O'Neill 



Hs 632 Roman Slavery (S; 3) 

Hs 633 European Imperialism in Africa (F; 3) 

Hs 639 Germany after 1945 (F; 3) 

Hs 645 America between the Wars (F; 3) 



Sandra Joshel 

David Northrup 

John Heineman 

Alan Lawson 



Hs 691-692 Honors Project (F, S; 3, 3) 

Proposals should be submitted, accompanied by a supporting 
letter from the directing faculty member, to the Department Chair- 
person no later than May 1st. All proposals for honors projects 
must be approved by the departmental honors committee. 

The Department 

Hs 694 Honors Thesis (S; 3) 

Students who have the approval of the department to enroll in 
a special honors project will carry this course as the credit vehicle 
for the paper produced in that project. This course is open only 
to students who have been given approval to enroll in an honors 
project (Hs 691-692). The Department 

Hs 695-696 Scholar of the College Project (F, S; 6, 3) 

Proposals for possible designation as scholar's projects should be 
submitted to the Chairperson early in the spring. Details of dates 
and required materials are available either from the Chairperson's 
office or from the office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences. All 
proposals must be approved by the Chairperson and the depart- 
mental honors committee. The Department 

Hs 698 Scholar of the College Thesis (S; 3) 

Students who are enrolled in an approved Scholar of the College 
Project (Hs 695-696) will carry this course as the credit vehicle 
for the final thesis submitted to the department in completion of 
that project. This course is open only to students who have been 
designated as candidates for the title of Scholar of the College. 

The Department 



Linguistics 



The description of the major program in General Linguistics ap- 
pears under the Department of Slavic and Eastern Languages. 



Mathematics 



Faculty 

Professor Gerald G. Bilodeau, A.B., University of Maine; A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor John H. Smith, A.B., Cornell University; Ph.D., Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology 

Professor Joseph A. Sullivan, A.B., Boston College; M.S., Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Associate Professor Robert J. Bond, A.B., Boston College; Ph.D., 
Brown University 

Associate Professor Rose Ring Carroll, A.B., Emmanuel College; 
A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Brown University 

Associate Professor Richard L. Faber, B.S., Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology; A.M., Ph.D., Brandeis University 

Associate Professor Margaret J. Kenney, B.S., M.A. Boston College; 
Ph.D., Boston University 

Associate Professor Charles Landraitis, A.B., Wesleyan University; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Ph.D., Dartmouth College 

Associate Professor Harvey R. Margolis, M.S., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago 

Associate Professor John P. Shanahan, B.S., M.S., University Col- 
lege, Galway; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Associate Professor Paul R. Thie, Chairman of the Department 
B.S., Canisius College; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Assistant Professor Paul T. Banks, A.B., A.M., Boston College 

Assistant Professor Richard A. Jenson, A.B., Dartmouth College; 
A.M., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago Circle 

Assistant Professor William J. Keane, A.B., Boston College; M.S., 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Assistant Professor Gerard E. Keough, A.B., Boston College; Ph.D., 
Indiana University 

Assistant Professor Joseph F. Krebs, A.B., A.M., Boston College 

Assistant Professor Archille J. Laferriere, A.B., A.M., Boston Col- 
lege 

Assistant Professor Robert J. LeBlanc, A.B., A.M., Boston College 

Assistant Professor Nancy E. Rallis, A.B., Vassar College; M.A., 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

Assistant Professor Stephen J. Ricci, B.S., University of Notre 
Dame; A.M., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Assistant Professor Ned I. Rosen, B.S., Tufts University; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Assistant Professor Daniel C. Sloughter, B.S., Gonzaga University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Dartmouth College 



Program Description 

The mathematics curriculum is designed to provide a solid foun- 
dation in the main areas of mathematics and mathematical ap- 
plications. Course work is offered in preparation for careers in 
mathematics as well as for graduate study in pure and applied 
mathematics, computer science, operations research, and quan- 
titative business management. 

The following mathematics courses (or their equivalent) are 
required: Mt 102-103, an introduction to calculus; Mt 060-061, 
an introduction to computer programming in BASIC; Mt 202-203, 
a course in multivariate calculus; Mt 216-217, an introduction 
to linear algebra; and Mt 302-303, special topics in advanced 
calculus. Mt 102-103 and Mt 060-061 are taken in the freshman 
year, Mt 202-203 in the sophomore year, and Mt 302-303 in the 
junior year. Mt 216-217 is normally taken in the sophomore year, 
although students double majoring in mathematics and another 
field may wish to take the course in the junior year. Well-prepared 
students can omit some of these courses and be placed directly 



Arts and Sciences / 55 

MATHEMATICS 



into the more advanced courses upon the recommendation of the 
chairperson. 

In addition to the above courses, two electives at the course 
level of 400 or above complete the minimum requirements for a 
student graduating as a mathematics major. (Students placing out 
of the introductory calculus course are required to take four ad- 
ditional electives.) Generally, students will take many more than 
this minimum. The department also strongly recommends that 
its majors take courses in the Department of Physics or some 
other area outside the Department of Mathematics which use a 
substantial amount of mathematics. 

The department offers to qualified students the opportunity to 
graduate with Departmental Honors. For this a student must: (a) 
complete successfully Mt 212-213, Mt 312-313, Mt 316-317; (b) 
complete successfully at least six other courses at the level of 400 
or above including at least one two-semester course from among 
Mt 814-815, Mt 816-817, or Mt 840-841; (c) maintain at least a 
B average in the 12 courses listed in (a) and (b); (d) participate 
in an independent reading or research project. This requirement 
may be fulfilled by doing extra reading or research in one of the 
advanced courses (level 400 or above) the student is taking, sub- 
ject to the approval of the professor. The departmental Curricu- 
lum Committee, at the student's request, may waive one or more 
of the preceding requirements. 



Course Offerings 

Mt 002-003 Introduction to College Mathematics I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

These courses are intended as preparation for calculus courses. 
Topics generally include real numbers, linear equations, quad- 
ratic equations, coordinate geometry and trigonometry. Enroll- 
ment is restricted to students whose high school background is 
deficient. Permission to enroll is required. 

Mt 004-005 Introduction to Finite Mathematics I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course sequence is for students in the humanities, social 
sciences, and the School of Education. The objective is to expose 
the student to mathematical ways of thinking and to the relation 
of mathematics to real world problems. Topics include elemen- 
tary logic, set theory, finite probability theory, vectors and mat- 
rices, and game theory. 

Mt 006-007 Ideas in Mathematics I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course sequence is for students in the humanities, social 
sciences and the School of Education. It is designed to introduce 
the student to the spirit of mathematics, its beauty and vitality, 
and to challenge him or her to do mathematics. Topics vary, but 
may be chosen from elementary number theory, geometry, and 
graph theory. 

Mt 008 Computers, Man and Society (S; 3) 

This course is for students in the humanities and social sciences. 
In this course the student will learn elementary programming 
using the BASIC language in the interactive mode. Through use 
of the language the student will be led to an appreciation of the 
power and versatility of the computer. Beyond learning the use 
of the language, stress will also be placed on the general problem 
solving aspects of programming. In addition several of the pro- 
gramming problems worked on will be used to introduce some 
of the societal and philosophical questions raised by the com- 
puter. 

Mt 010 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (F, S; 3) 

This is a one-semester course designed for students who wish to 
take an introductory calculus course, particularly Mt 100 or Mt 
174, but who feel that their high school preparation in mathe- 
matics is inadequate. Topics include functions and graphs, ex- 
ponential and logarithmic functions, and trigonometry. 

Mt 014-015 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course sequence is for students in the humanities, the social 
sciences and the School of Education. It includes a discussion of 
standard topics in differential calculus. The treatment of the de- 
rivative includes the differentiation of algebraic and transcen- 
dental functions along with applications. The study of the integral 



56 / Arts and Sciences 

MATHEMATICS 



includes a brief survey of methods of integration together with 
applications. A short discussion of analytic geometry is included 
where required. The approach is informal and concrete rather 
than rigorous and theoretical. 

Mt 060-061 Introduction to Computer Programming (F, S; 1, 2) 

This course or the equivalent is required of all mathematics ma- 
jors and is usually taken in the freshman year. The course pro- 
vides an introduction to programming techniques and the language 
BASIC. In the first semester, the emphasis is on the development 
of programming skills and the learning of the language. In the 
second semester, the use of the computer in solving number the- 
ory and calculus problems is demonstrated. Topics such as sim- 
ulation, curve plotting, and files are treated as time permits. 

For credit purposes, completion of the two semesters is con- 
sidered equivalent to the completion of a three-credit one- 
semester course. 

Mt 090-091 Mathematics for Teachers I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is intended to provide an adequate background for 
teaching the basic concepts covered in the K-9 mathematics cur- 
riculum. Emphasis is on content although ideas and activities to 
promote a better understanding of and appreciation for mathe- 
matics will be presented. Topics to be covered include the real 
number system, set theory and mathematical structures, functions 
and graphing, elements of probability and statistics. 

Mt 100-101 Calculus I, II (F, S; 3-F, S; 3) 

This course is primarily for students majoring in a natural science 
or economics and those in the premedical program. It is a course 
in the calculus of functions of one variable. Topics covered in- 
clude limits, derivatives, integrals, transcendental functions, 
techniques of integration, and applications. 

Mt 102-103 Introductory Analysis I, II (F, S; 4, 4) 

This course sequence is for students majoring in Mathematics. 
Topics covered include the algebraic and analytic properties of 
the real number system, functions, limits, derivatives, integrals, 
and applications of the derivative and integral. 

Mt 110 Calculus/Accelerated (F; 3) 

This course is an accelerated version of Calculus I and II, Mt 
100—101, and is designed for students who have had the equiv- 
alent of a one year course in calculus in secondary school. Topics 
include those listed for Calculus I and II and will be treated in 
one semester. 

Mt 112-113 Introductory Analysis (Honors) I, II (F, S; 4, 4) 

Enrollment in these courses is limited to students who have dem- 
onstrated an unusually high aptitude and achievement in Math- 
ematics. Topics covered include the algebraic and analytic 
properties of the real number system, functions, limits, deriva- 
tives, integrals, and applications of the derivative and integral. 

Mt 174-175 Calculus for Management Sciences I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course sequence is primarily for students in the School of 
Management. Topics covered include the analytic geometry of 
algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions, differentiation 
and integration of such functions, the solution of elementary dif- 
ferential equations, and applications of each of these topics to 
business and economics. 

Mt 184 Calculus for Management Sciences/ Accelerated (F; 3) 

This course is an accelerated version of Calculus for Management 
Sciences I and II, Mt 174-175, and is designed for students who 
have had the equivalent of a one year course in calculus in sec- 
ondary school. The calculus of functions of one variable is thor- 
oughly reviewed in one semester. 

Mt 200-201 Intermediate Calculus I, II (F, S; 3-F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 100-101 or Mt 110 

This course sequence is a continuation of Mt 100-101. Topics 
include vectors and analytic geometry of three dimensions, par- 
tial differentiation and multiple integration with applications, 
and an introduction to differential equations. 

Mt 202-203 Multivariable Calculus I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 102-103 

This course is a continuation of Mt 102-103. Topics include vec- 
tor algebra and analytic geometry of three dimensions, curves and 



surfaces, partial differentiation and multiple integration with ap- 
plications, and an introduction to differential equations. 

Mt 212-213 Multivariable Calculus (Honors) I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 112-113 

Enrollment in these courses is limited to those students whose 
work in Mt 113 has been of honors quality. Topics covered in- 
clude vector valued functions including some elementary differ- 
ential geometry of curves and surfaces, partial differentiation and 
multiple integration with applications, and an introduction to 
differential equations. 

Mt 214 Introduction to Multivariable Calculus (F, S; 3) 

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the 
elements of the calculus of functions of several variables. This 
course is designed primarily for students of the social and man- 
agerial sciences and should be considered as an elective for those 
students who have had two semesters of elementary calculus, 
such as, Mt 014-015 and Mt 174-175. The approach will be for 
the most part nontheoretical with emphasis on applications that 
are relevant to the social and managerial sciences. Topics covered 
include functions of several variables, three-dimensional coor- 
dinate geometry, partial derivatives, max/min problems, Lagrange 
multipliers. 

Mt 215 Elementary Linear Algebra (S; 3) 

This course is designed to satisfy the needs of students wanting 
an elementary introduction to matrix theory and linear algebra. 
This includes students in the natural sciences, social sciences, 
and the School of Management. Topics include matrices, vector 
spaces, determinants, linear equations and applications. There 
are no prerequisites although some college level mathematics is 
desirable. 

Mt 216-217 Introduction to Linear Algebra I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is designed to develop the student's ability to do 
abstract mathematics as well as learn the basic notions of linear 
algebra. Topics covered include systems of linear equations, vec- 
tor spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, eigen- 
values and inner product spaces. There will be applications to 
Markov chains and differential equations as time permits. 

Mt 220 Introduction to Statistics (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: High School Algebra 

This is an elementary course in inferential statistics, designed for 
students in fields such as business, nursing and the social sci- 
ences. Topics include such descriptive measures as the mean and 
standard deviation of sample distributions, probability, the bi- 
nomial and normal distributions, estimation hypothesis testing, 
correlation and regression. 

Mt 290 Number Theory for Teachers (F; 3) 

(Not offered in academic year 1982-83.) 

Mt 291 Geometry for Teachers (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 090-091 

This course is intended to fill a basic need of all teachers of grades 
K-9. Geometry now occupies a significant role in the elementary 
mathematics curriculum. The course will treat content but ideas 
for presenting geometry as an activity-based program will be 
stressed. Topics to be covered in depth include the square and 
triangular geoboards, motion geometry, and their relation to the 
standard Euclidean geometry. 

Mt 300-301 Advanced Calculus (Science Majors) I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 201 

This course sequence is designed for majors in Biology, Chem- 
istry, Geology, and Physics. Topics include: sequences and series, 
power series solutions of differential equations, special functions, 
elementary partial differential equations, Fourier series. Appli- 
cations are emphasized and other topics are added as time per- 
mits. 

Mt 302-303 Advanced Calculus I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 203 or Mt 213 

The first semester is designed to develop an understanding of, 
and facility in working with infinite sequences and series, uni- 
form convergence and power series. In the second semester, stu- 
dents will see some advanced applications of the standard topics 



Arts and Sciences / 57 

MATHEMATICS 



of analysis. Topics will include series solutions of differential 
equations, Fourier series, special functions and other topics as 
time permits. 

Mt 312-313 Mathematical Analysis (Honors) I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 213 

Enrollment is restricted to those students whose work has been 
of honors quality. The content of these courses is similar to that 
of Mt 302-303. 

Mt 316-317 Introduction to Linear Algebra (Honors) I, II 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

Enrollment is restricted to those students whose work has been 
of honors quality. The content of these courses is similar to that 
of Mt 216-217. 

Mt 410 Differential Equations (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Linear Algebra and Mt 203 

This course is a junior-senior elective intended primarily for the 
general student who is interested in seeing applications of math- 
ematics. Among the topics covered will be: first order linear 
equations, second order linear equations, general nth order equa- 
tions with constant coefficients, series solutions, special func- 
tions. 

Mt 414 Numerical Analysis (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 201 or Mt 203 

Topics include the solution of linear and non-linear algebraic 
equations, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integra- 
tion, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, ap- 
proximation theory. 

Mt 420 Probability and Statistics (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 201, Mt 203, or Mt 214 

This course is introductory but assumes a calculus background. 
It is open to any mathematics or science major who has not taken 
Mt 426. Its purpose is to provide an overview of the basic concepts 
of probability and statistics and their applications. Topics include 
probability functions over discrete and continuous sample spaces, 
independence and conditional probabilities, random variables 
and their distributions, sampling theory, the central limit theo- 
rem, expectation, confidence intervals and estimation, hypothesis 
testing. 

Mt 426 Probability (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 203 

A general introduction to modern probability theory. Topics stud- 
ied include probability spaces, distributions of functions of ran- 
dom variables, weak law of large numbers, central limit theorems 
and conditional distributions. 

Mt 427 Mathematical Statistics (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 426 

Topics studied include: sampling distributions, introduction to 
decision theory, parametric point and interval estimation, hy- 
pothesis testing and introduction to Bayesian statistics. 

Mt 430 Introduction to Number Theory (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 216-217 

Topics covered include divisibility, unique factorization, con- 
gruences, number-theoretic functions, primitive roots, diophan- 
tine equations, continued fractions, quadratic residues, and the 
distribution of primes. An attempt will be made to provide his- 
torical background for various problems and also to provide ex- 
amples useful in the secondary school curriculum. 

Mt 435-436 Mathematical Programming I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

By providing an introduction to the theory, techniques, and ap- 
plications of mathematical programming, this course demon- 
strates how mathematical theory can be developed and applied 
to solve problems from management, economics, and the social 
sciences. Topics studied from linear programming include a gen- 
eral discussion of linear optimization models, the theory and 
development of the simplex algorithm, degeneracy, duality, sen- 
sitivity analysis, and the dual simplex algorithm. Integer pro- 
gramming problems, and the transportation and assignment 
problems are considered, and algorithms are developed for their 
resolution. 



Other topics are drawn from game theory, dynamic program- 
ming, Markov decision processes (with finite and infinite hori- 
zons), network analysis, and non-linear programming. 

Mt 445 Applied Combinatorics (S; 3) 

This is a course in enumeration and graph theory. The object of 
the course is to develop proficiency in solving discrete mathe- 
matics problems. Among the topics covered are: counting meth- 
ods for arrangements and selections, the pigeonhole principle, 
the inclusion-exclusion principle, generating functions, recur- 
rence relations, graph theory, trees and searching, and network 
algorithms. The problem-solving techniques developed apply to 
the analysis of computer systems but most of the problems in the 
course are from recreational mathematics. 

Mt 451 Topics in Geometry (F; 3) 

(Not offered in academic year 1982-83.) 

Mt 460 Introduction to Structured Programming (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 060—061 or permission of instructor 
This course consists of an introduction to computer programming 
using a high-level, block-structured language. Emphasis will be 
placed on writing structured computer programs, via algorithm 
development and refinement. Examples to be programmed will 
include, but not be limited to, the Calculus, elementary linear 
algebra, and basic statistics. 

Mt 461 Advanced Computer Programming Techniques (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 460 or permission of instructor 
This course will give students the opportunity to solve program- 
ming problems more substantial than those normally seen at the 
introductory level. Recursion will be covered. Elementary data 
structures, such as stacks, queues and lists, will be introduced 
and their use to write recursive programs directly will be ex- 
amined. Other conbinatorial structures, such as trees and directed 
graphs, will also be covered. In addition, students will be ex- 
pected to become familiar with the various means of data entry/ 
retrieval on the B.C. Computing system. 

Mt 462 Internal Machine Structure (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 460—461 or permission of instructor 
Truly efficient programs may only be written provided that there 
is a clear understanding of how the computer itself is organized. 
Toward this end, the course will investigate data representation 
and program execution at the machine level, and develop sub- 
routines and macros as programming structures. Other topics in- 
clude assemblers, linking loaders and debuggers. 

Mt 463 Algorithms: Design and Analysis (S; 3) 

Prequisites: Mt 461 or Mc 406; and Mt 462 or Mc 452 
To be effective, an algorithm must be both correct and make 
efficient use of system resources. This course will present various 
approaches to algorithm design, while at the same time devel- 
oping techniques for evaluating the efficiency of an algorithm 
and verifying its correctness. Topics to be examined include sort- 
ing, searching, parsing, and recursion. 

Mt 699 Reading and Research (F, S; 3) 

This course is open to a student only on the recommendation of 
some member of the faculty and with the approval of the Chair- 
person or Assistant Chairperson. The student will work inde- 
pendently in some advanced or special area of mathematics under 
the guidance of a faculty member. 

Mt 802-803 Analysis I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is intended to emphasize the basic ideas and results 
of calculus and to provide an introduction to abstract analysis. 
The course begins with an axiomatic introduction of the real 
number system. Metric spaces are then introduced. Theoretical 
aspects of convergence, continuity, differentiation and integra- 
tion are treated carefully and are studied in the context of a metric 
space. The course includes an introduction to the Lebesgue in- 
tegral. 

Mt 814-815 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I, II 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

Differentiation and integration of a function of a complex variable, 
series expansion, residue theory. Entire and meromorphic func- 



58 / Arts and Sciences 

MUSIC 



tions, multiple-valued functions. Riemann surfaces, conformal 
mapping problems. 

Mt 816-817 Modern Algebra I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: An introductory course in modern or linear algebra. 
This course will study the basic structures of abstract algebra. 
Topics will include groups, rings, ideal theory, unique factori- 
zation, homomorphisms, field extensions and possibly Galois 
theory. 

Mt 840-841 Topology I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is a first course in topology for both undergraduate 
and graduate students. Topology is the study of geometric phe- 
nomena of a very general sort, and as such, topological notions 
appear throughout pure and applied mathematics. The first se- 
mester is devoted to General or Point-Set Topology with emphasis 
on those topics of greatest applicability. The subject will be pre- 
sented in a self-contained and rigorous fashion with stress on the 
underlying geometric insights. The content of the second semes- 
ter varies from year to year. In general it will be an introduction 
to a specialized area of topology; for example algebraic, differ- 
ential or geometric topology. 

Mt 860 Mathematical Logic (F; 3) 

(Not offered in academic year 1982-83.) 

Mt 861 Foundations of Mathematics (S; 3) 

(Not offered in academic year 1982—83.) 

Mt 899 Reading and Research (F, S; 3) 

Mt 900 Thesis Seminar (F, S; 3) 

Problems of research and thesis guidance, supplemented by in- 
dividual conferences. 

Mt 901 Thesis Direction (F, S; 0, 0) 

A non-credit course for those who have received six credits for 
Thesis Seminar but who have not finished their thesis. This 
course must be registered for and the continuation fee paid each 
semester until the thesis is completed. 

Mt 902-903 Seminar (F, S; 0, 0) 

This is a non-credit course which is required for all candidates 
for the M.A. degree who do not take Mt 900. 



Music 



Faculty 

Associate Professor Olga Stone, Musician-in-Residence; Director 

of Music Programs 

Mus.B., Mus.M., Mus.D., Boston University 

Composer-in-Residence C. Alexander Peloquin 

American Composer-Author Hugo Norden, Mus. D., University of 
Toronto 



Program Description 

Courses in Music are designed to provide the undergraduate with 
an intellectual understanding of Western Music as a science and 
an art. There are courses in history, theory, and piano perform- 
ance. Most courses in Music History include examination of the 
major forms and styles within a specific period with pertinent 
musical examples. 

Courses in Music Theory are of interest to students who have 
played a musical instrument. Orchestration, the study of the in- 
struments of the orchestra, is of particular value for students who 
wish to arrange music. The study of the piano, the foundation of 
all music studies, provides a variety of benefits for students who 
wish to learn to perform music, to learn coordination, rhythm, 
and style firsthand. It affords the opportunity for those students 
who have studied the instrument since childhood to continue 
with advanced work. 

Courses specializing in specific periods in history such as Ba- 
roque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary, piano perform- 



ance as well as the theoretical courses, are identical with courses 
which elsewhere comprise requirements for the Music major 
within a liberal arts curriculum. Therefore, should a student dem- 
onstrate marked musical ability, an Independent Major in Music 
may be designed under the guidance of the Director for approval 
by the Educational Policy Committee. 

Course Offerings 

Mu 059 Music in Western Civilization (F; 3) 

A general introduction from Gregorian Chant to Stravinsky. 

C. Alexander Peloquin 

Mu 060 Survey of the History of Western Music (F, S; 3) 

A comprehensive one-semester foundation course in Western 
music from the ninth century to the present; examination of major 
musical forms, styles and ideas as utilized by the great composers. 

OJga Stone 

Mu 068 Basic Piano (F, S; 3) 

Students will learn to read F and G clefs, to understand the sig- 
nificance of time, meter, rhythm, tempo. The student will prepare 
to play 4-part harmony at the piano. 
Not offered 1982-83 The Department 

Mu 070 Music Theory I (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 068 

Development of musicianship through listening and keyboard 
problems. Chord grammar developed through harmonization of 
melodies and figured basses. Introduction to systematic study of 
form. Hugo Norden 

Mu 071 Music Theory II (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 070 

Intermediate level work in structural hearing and applied key- 
board harmony; beginning work in score reading. Introduction 
to instrumentation, properties of wind and brass instruments. 
Formal and compositional idioms of the late Baroque. 

Hugo Norden 

Mu 072 Music Theory III (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 070 and Mu 071 

Diatonic and chromatic harmony, form and analysis. 



Not offered 1982-83 



Hugo Norden 



Mu 073 Counterpoint I (S; 3) 

Strict counterpoint in two, three and four parts. The five species 
approach. Imitation and double counterpoint. Hugo Norden 

Mu 074 Instrumentation I (F; 3) 

The study of the instruments of the symphony orchestra, its char- 
acter, timbre, range, ability to read an orchestral score, transpose 
and write instrumental music. Hugo Norden 

Mu 161 Music and the Theatre (S; 3) 

From Monteverdi's Orfeo to the super romantic music dramas of 
Wagner; from Carl Orff's Carmina Burana to West Side Story of 
Bernstein. C. Alexander Peloquin 

Mu 162 Modern Music (F; 3) 

From Erik Satie and Debussy to Copland and Bernstein, masters 
of Europe and the Americas — a full spectrum of the sounds of the 
20th Century. C. Alexander Peloquin 

Mu 163 Music in the Americas (S; 3) 

From Billings, Ives, Gershwin, Ellington, Copland to Chavez and 
Villa-Lobos — modern romantics, iconoclasts and liberals of the 
United States, Mexico, and South America. 

C. Alexander Peloquin 

Mu 165 Beethoven (F; 3) 

All the symphonies. Representative sonatas and quartets from the 

three major periods, covered in general listening. 

Not offered 1981-1982 John R. Willis, S./. 

Mu 170 Brahms (S; 3) 

His life and works. 

Not offered 1982-83 John R. Willis, S.J. 

Mu 171 Wagner (S; 3) 

His life and works. 

Not offered 1982-83 John R. Willis, S.J. 

Mu 172 Music of the Baroque (F; 3) 

Music in the 17th and 1st half of the 18th centuries; from Mon- 
teverdi and Schiitz to Bach and Handel. Rise of new forms and 



Arts and Sciences / 59 

PHILOSOPHY 



growth of instrumental music; opera, oratorio, cantata, trio-son- 
ata, solo sonata, concerto, concerto grosso, the aria, the dance 
suite, the fugue. 
Not offered 1982-83 Olga Stone 

Mu 173 Keyboard Music (F; 3) 

A comprehensive survey of keyboard music from the Baroque, 
Classical, Romantic and Contemporary periods including Mozart, 
Beethoven, Chopin, Debussy and others. 
Not offered in 1982-83 OJga Stone 

Mu 174 Music of the Classical Period (F; 3) 

The formulation of the classic principles of construction by Jo- 
seph Haydn with reference to contributions of C.P.E. Bach and 
the Mannheim School. The fulfillment of the classical ideal in 
the works of Mozart and Beethoven. Olga Stone 

Mu 175 The Music of Beethoven (F; 3) 

A thorough examination of the nine symphonies including form, 
analysis, and style with reference to Beethoven's related works 
within each of the three periods. OJga Stone 

Mu 176 Brahms, Wagner and the Romantics (S; 3) 

Changing concepts of the symphony after Beethoven; the Ro- 
manticists' approach to form. Study of the major symphonies, 
instrumental and chamber works including Berlioz, Chopin, 
Schubert, Schumann, Dvorak, Bruckner and others. OJga Stone 

Mu 178 The Impressionist School (S; 3) 

Music of the twentieth century. Study of stylistic changes in or- 
chestral, instrumental, and chamber music from Debussy to 
Stravinsky. OJga Stone 

Mu 183-184 Piano Tutorial (F, S; 3) 

The study of the foundation instrument, tutorial fee required. 
This course is designed to promote proper reproduction of the 
musical characteristics of compositions in authentic style and 
tradition thereby providing a background for all music courses, 
as well as continuing studies for advanced students. 
By arrangement OJga Stone 

Mu 299 Reading and Research (F, S; 3) 

Supervised reading within specific areas, for the solution and 
expansion of individual projects. This course may be taken only 
with permission of the Director. 
By arrangement OJga Stone 

Mu 303 Bach and Beethoven . . . The Titans (F; 3) 

Perusal of the ideals of the Baroque through the works of its 
greatest master and comparison with ideals of classical Roman- 
ticism as developed by Beethoven. Examination of form and style 
through major works of each. 
Not offered 1982-83 OJga Stone 



Professor William J. Richardson, S. J., Ph.L., Woodstock College; 
Th.L., Ph.D., Maitre Agrege, Louvain 

Visiting Professor Jacques M. Taminiaux, University of Louvain 

Professor Norman J. Wells, A.B., Boston College; L.M.S., Pontifical 
Institute of Medieval Studies; A.M., Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Associate Professor Patrick Byrne, B.S., A.M., Boston College; 
Ph.D., New York State University 

Associate Professor Richard Cobb-Stevens, A.B., A.M., Boston Col- 
lege; Ph.D., Sorbonne 

Associate Professor Joseph F. X. Flanagan, S.J., Chairman of the 
Department 

A.B., A.M., Boston College; S.T.L., Weston College; D.D.S., Wash- 
ington University; Ph.D., Fordham University 

Associate Professor William J. Haggerty, Jr., A.B., College of the 
Holy Cross; A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Boston University 

Associate Professor Peter J. Kreeft, A.B., Calvin College; A.M., 
Ph.D., Fordham University 

Associate Professor Stuart B. Martin, A.B., Sacred Heart College; 
L.M.H., Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies; A.M., Ph.D., 
Fordham University 

Associate Professor Daniel J. Shine, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
A.M., Catholic University of America; S.T.L., Weston College; 
Ph.D., Gregorian University 

Assistant Professor James Bernauer, S.J., A.B., Fordham University; 
A.M., St. Louis University; M.Div., Woodstock College; S.T.M., 
Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D.(cand.) State University of 
New York 

Assistant Professor Joseph H. Casey, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston Col- 
lege; A.M., Fordham University; S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., 
Gregorian University 

Assistant Professor Arthur R. Madigan, S.J., A.B., Fordham Uni- 
versity; A.M., Ph.D., University of Toronto; M.Div. (cand.) Regis 
College, Toronto 

Assistant Professor Francis P. Molloy, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston Col- 
lege; S.T.L., Weston College 

Assistant Professor Gerald C. O'Brien, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston Col- 
lege; Ph.D., Fordham University 

Assistant Professor Francis Soo, A.B., Berchmans College; A.M., 
University of Philippines; B.S.T., Fu-Jen University; A.M., Har- 
vard University; Ph.D., Boston College 



Philosophy 



Faculty 

Professor Frederick J. Adelmann, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., Saint Louis University 

Professor Thomas J. Blakeley, A.B., Sacred Heart Seminary; Ph.D., 
University of Fribourg 

Professor Oliva Blanchette, A.B., A.M., Boston College; S.T.L., 
Weston College; Ph.D., Universite Laval; Ph.L., College St. Albert 
de Louvain 

Visiting Professor Hans-Georg Gadamer, Heidelberg University 

Professor Richard T. Murphy, A.B., A.M., Boston College; S.T.L., 
Weston College; Ph.D., Fordham University 

Professor Joseph L. Navickas, Ph.B., Ph.L., Louvain University; 
Ph.D., Fordham University 

Professor Thomas J. Owens, A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., 
Fordham University 

Professor David M. Ramussen, A.B., University of Minnesota; B.D., 
A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 



Program Description 

Philosophical study at Boston College provides the opportunity 
for open-ended inquiry and reflection on the most basic questions 
that concern man and the ultimate dimensions of his world. In 
this quest for new and fuller meanings, the Philosophy Depart- 
ment offers a balanced program of courses allowing for concen- 
tration in the following specialized areas: Ancient, Medieval and 
Contemporary; American and Contemporary Continental Philos- 
ophy; Philosophy of Religion, Philosophy of Science and Russian 
Philosophy. In addition to these areas of specialization, provision 
is made for interdisciplinary programs. Working under the guid- 
ance of a faculty advisor students can design a well-balanced 
program that will thoroughly ground them in the history of phi- 
losophy and yet allow for development of their major interests. 

Special sections of "core" philosophy courses are also planned 
for philosophy majors. Undergraduate students may, with the 
approval of the chairperson and the individual professor, enroll 
in certain of the graduate philosophy courses. 

The Department offers to qualified students the opportunity to 
do independent research under the direction of a professor and 
replace one course for three credits, extendable to six credits. 
Senior majors may work out a special research program as a sub- 
stitution for normal course requirements. The Department also 
participates in the Scholar of the College Program, details of 



60 / Arts and Sciences 

PHILOSOPHY 



which are to be found in the general catalog description of the 
Program. 

Undergraduate majors who plan to do graduate work in phi- 
losophy will be prepared more than adequately to meet all re- 
quirements of graduate schools. 



Course Offerings 

Depending on student demand, the courses listed below may not 
be offered at the time indicated. If a desired course is not offered, 
please consult with the appropriate professor. It may be possible 
to arrange a Readings and Research course on the desired topic. 



Core Courses 

PI 009 Ethics (F, S; 3) 

An investigation of the rational basis of moral value in an attempt 
to establish ethical principles. Specific application of these norms 
will be examined and applied to various moral problems. 

The Department 

PI 070 Philosophy of the Person I and II (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is based on two Socratic sayings: "know yourself," 
and "the unexamined life is not worth living." This course, there- 
fore, will analyze the key thinkers in Western culture who have 
contributed to our knowledge of ourselves and our society. Spe- 
cific considerations will be given to the problem of the human 
person along with the basic rights and responsibilities that each 
one has to himself, herself, and to others. The Department 

PI 090 Perspectives on Western Culture I and II (F, S; 6, 6) 

This is a special two-semester, twelve-credit course that fulfills 
all the core requirements in philosophy and theology. The course 
will introduce the students into their philosophical and religious 
heritage through a study of the writings of the major thinkers who 
have formed our cultural traditions. The purpose of the course 
is to encourage students to discover the sources of those values 
that have formed their lives as well as to develop a critical and 
creative perspective toward themselves and their future. 

The Department 

Un 105 Perspectives on Modernism (F, S; 6, 6) 

A full-year course in the literature, music, and visual arts usually 
connected with the term "modernism." The first eight weeks of 
the term will be devoted to literature, the last five of the first term 
and the first five of the second to music, and the last eight of the 
second term to the visual arts. Among authors read during the 
literature segment will be Baudelaire, Dostoevsky, Ibsen, Eliot, 
Kafka, and Joyce. The composers listened to during the music 
segment will include Wagner, Debussy, and Stravinsky; there will 
also be at least one week of jazz. The visual arts segment will 
emphasize not only painting but also sculture and architecture. 
Classes will mainly be conducted in open discussion rather than 

as lectures. To be announced 

Un 110 Horizons of the New Social Sciences (F, S; 6, 6) 

The course is designed to lead the student to an understanding 
of the unity that underlies the diversity of the separate social 
sciences of economics, sociology, political science, and law from 
a viewpoint that does not prescind from theological issues. 

To be announced 

Un 120 New Scientific Visions Perspectives IV (F, S; 6, 6) 

Can the study of modern mathematics and the natural sciences 
prove to be a genuine liberation of the human spirit? This unusual 
question will form the central theme of this course. The course 
will explore major developments in the fields of mathematics, 
biology, physics, chemistry and the earth and space sciences from 
ancient Greece, through the modern scientific revolutions of the 
seventeenth century, into the twentieth century achievements 
and paradoxes of modern number theory, the discovery of DNA, 
relativity theories, quantum mechanics and contemporary cos- 
mologies. In particular, the startling innovations wrought by the 
concepts of function, energy and randomness in the fields of 
mathematics, biology, physics and chemistry will be explored. 
These developments will be presented in their mutually condi- 



tioning relationships to one another, and in terms of their impacts 
upon our philosophical world-view. Patrick H. Bryne 

PULSE Courses 

PI 088-089 Person and Social Responsibility (F, S; 6, 6) 

This is a two-semester, twelve-credit course that fulfills all the 
core requirements in philosophy and theology. The course re- 
quirements include both ongoing involvement in one of the field 
projects available through the PULSE Program (see Special Study 
Programs section), as well as participation in a correlated class. 
The course will focus on problems of social injustice, and the 
possibilities of surmounting those injustices. The field projects 
will put students directly in contact with people experiencing 
the consequences of one or another form of social injustice — 
delinquency, poverty, psychological problems, prejudice, alien- 
ation. The classes will attempt to take a deeper look into these, 
especially with regard to their individual, group and cultural 
origins. Drawing on the works, both contemporary and tradi- 
tional, of key philosophical and religious figures, the classes will 
engage students in the challenge of personal self-discovery and 
growth as they relate to the question of what it really means to 
assume responsibility for overcoming these injustices. 

To be announced 

PI 202 Housing and Reality (F, S; 3, 3) 

An in-depth study of housing, the purchasing of, investment in, 
management of, and trends of the market with views in the urban 
neighborhoods. 

The effects of the multiple factors affecting housing such as 
design, construction, methods, urban planning, political manip- 
ulation and financing with its relationship to the various eco- 
nomic groups of society. Harry GottschaJk 

PI 217 The Structure of Community Life (S; 3) 

This is a seminar intended for juniors and seniors with PULSE 
experience in the South End. The aims of the course include 
reflection upon the problems of government and power at the 
neighborhood level and an investigation of the symbolic config- 
urations of local life. David Manzo 

PI 233 Values, Health and Welfare (F; 3) 

This course will undertake a multidisciplinary critique of health 
delivery as a system in the United States. A primary objective 
will be the development of critical modes of thinking as a way 
to understand and influence social change. This course is open 
to all interested, although concurrent participation in a PULSE 
field project is strongly recommended. David Manzo 

PI 291-292 Philosophy of Community I and II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Limited to members of the PULSE Council. 
A study of community: its structure, power and change. The dy- 
namics of community will be examined by sharing impressions 
and insights with various teachers and community workers. Spe- 
cific theoretical models of analysis will be studied and critiqued. 
The purpose of the course is to begin developing new approaches 
for learning about social change and for building new visions for 
the direction that a PULSE student's responsibility to social 
change might take. Joseph Flanagan, S.J. 

PI 293-294 Culture and Social Structure: Philosophy of PULSE I 
and II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Membership on PULSE Council. 
The course will concentrate on the interrelationships between 
American political, economic, social and military institutions. As 
these interrelations are explored on a "macro" scale, a microan- 
alysis of like patterns at the neighborhood and city level will also 
be undertaken. 
Offered 1983-1984 Joseph Flanagan, S./. 

Electives 

PI 121 Major 20th Century Philosophers (F; 3) 

This course is intended to introduce beginning students to some 
of the leading 20th century philosophical movements. It begins 
with an examination of the background tradition of modern ra- 
tionalism and empiricism (Descartes, Hume, Kant). Then the fol- 



Arts and Sciences / 61 

PHILOSOPHY 



lowing philosophical movements are considered: Life Philosophy 
(Bergson, Nietzsche); Existentialism (Kierkegaard, Heidegger); 
American Philosophy (Peirce, James, Dewey, Whitehead); Phe- 
nomenology (Husserl). Key texts from each philosopher will be 
selected for reading and analysis. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Thomas /. Owens 

Pi 150 Contemporary Analysis of Myth and Symbol (F; 3) 

An exploration of the relationship between reflective philosophy 
and the interpretation of myth and symbol in the works of Freud, 
Jung, Eliade and Ricoeur. Special emphasis is placed on a phen- 
omenology of the symbols of evil and a structural analysis of the 
mythic content of primitive religions. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PI 161 Philosophy of Religion (S; 3) 

An elaboration of a phenomenological "typology" of the forms 
of religious experience. Consistent patterns of experience will be 
grouped according to the models of participation, encounter and 
community. This method offers an interpretative framework for 
understanding the symbol systems of a wide variety of religious 
expressions, both Eastern and Western. The course will also ex- 
plore the possibility of meaningful religious language in a secu- 
larized culture. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PI 165 Human Person and Love (F; 3) 

This course will examine the notion of love and the experience 

of love from a philosophic viewpoint, with an emphasis on both 

the phenomenology of the loving experience, and the history of 

the philosophic understanding of love in Greek and Christian 

times. 

Offered Fall, 1983 Daniel J. Shine, S.J. 

PI 166 Freedom and Authority (S; 3) 

A cooperative effort to make precise the questions concerning 
freedom and authority will open the course. As an aid to this, 
Adler's booklet Freedom, Maritain's Man and the State and Tho- 
reau's essay on "Civil Disobedience" will be read. After tentative 
answers have been reached we will turn to some of the classical 
works on this subject in hopes of confirming our answers, deep- 
ening or changing our questions or introducing new questions: 
Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Politics, Hobbes's Leviathan, Locke's 
Second Treatise of Government, J. S. Mill's On Liberty. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Joseph H. Casey, S.J. 

PI 183 The Philosophy of Modern Sports (F; 3) 

An inquiry into the nature and role of games and sports in shaping 
various ethical ideals, especially those values which are intrinsic 
to the functioning of a genuine democracy. Among the topics 
examined will be the rise of sports in ancient Greece; the Roman 
tradition; the Mediaeval interlude; sports in the modern era; ideal- 
istic, materialistic and existential reflections on the meaning of 
sports; sports as education, and the role of education in imple- 
menting the Democratic ideal; the Marxist critique of modern 
sports; the Neo-Marxist reflection of all sports; a Weberian anal- 
ysis of the meaning of sports; the dialectics of winning; violence; 
professionalism; sports as kinesthetic art and as theater; the role 
of women in sports. Stuart B. Martin 

PI 193 Chinese Philosophy I: Confucianism, Taoism and 
Buddhism (F; 3) 

Starting from a general introduction to Chinese philosophy as a 
whole, the course will focus on three of the most important phil- 
osophical schools: Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism. Em- 
phasizing social harmony and order, Confucianism deals mainly 
with human relationships and human virtues. Centered on the 
harmony between Nature, Man and Society, Taoism teaches the 
most natural way to achieve this harmony, i.e., Tao. Sinicized as 
soon as it arrived in China, Buddhism reveals that the ultimate 
reality both transcends all being, names and forms, and remains 
empty and quiet in its nature. Francis Y. Soo 

PI 194 Chinese Philosophy II: Neo-Confucianism and 
Maoism (S; 3) 

Within the historical context of modern China (from 1840 up to 
the present), the course will focus on contemporary philosophical 
trends. Two of them are of particular importance. One is Neo- 
Confucianism which tries to revive or modernize not only tra- 



ditional Confucianism but also Chinese Classical philosophies in 
general. 

The other is Chinese Marxism, which under Mao, tries to 'sub- 
stitute' Chinese Marxism for the Classical Chinese philosophies. 
It is very interesting to study how contemporary Chinese philos- 
ophers have tried to philosophize in contemporary China. 

Francis Y. Soo 

PI 203 Analytic Philosophy (F; 3) 

Words cannot express what great value students are likely to 
derive from this course. The questions raised (about thought, 
language, and reality) are fundamental, and those who raise them 
(Bradley, Wittgenstein, Tacelli) are among the most brilliant rep- 
resentatives of their traditions. Ronald Tacelli 

Un 212 Perspectives on Marxism (F; 3) 

This interdisciplinary course is sponsored by the Department of 
Philosophy and the Center for East Europe, Russia and Asia. The 
ten professors (two political scientists, philosophers and histo- 
rians; one each from economics, education, linguistics and so- 
ciology) present a coherent overview, enabling the student to gain 
an understanding of the Marxist phenomenon from all major per- 
spectives and providing an orientation for planning the student's 
further study of the questions raised by this important 
movement. Thomas J. Blakeley 

PI 242 The Philosophy of St. Augustine (F; 3) 

An introduction, via historical overview and careful reading of 

varied primary texts, of the poet, philosopher, lover and saint 

who was one of the three or four most influential thinkers of all 

time. 

Offered Fall, 1983 Peter J. Kreeft 

PI 246 Contemporary Women in Philosophy (F, S; 3) 

There is growing evidence that in the area of detached philo- 
sophical contemplation, women have made and are making sig- 
nificant contributions to philosophy which bring to it new and 
fresh insights and challenges. With the work of such women as 
Sissela Bok, Simone de Beauvoir, Hannah Arendt — to name but 
a few — one may wonder if philosophy, thought through by 
women, will not eventually produce new and subtle discoveries 
with regard to traditional philosophical problems. Contemporary 
Women in Philosophy is a seminar-styled course for both men 
and women. Throughout the semester, we will read and ponder 
selections from the books chosen and discuss them in light of the 
tradition. Patricia Bowen 

PI 248 Modern Political Philosophy (F; 3) 

This course will consider the political philosophies of six major 

philosophers of the modern period, namely, Machiavelli, Hobbes, 

Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel and Marx. The course will include 

lecture and discussion. A mid-term and a final exam will be 

required. 

Offered Fall, 1983 David M. Rasmussen 

PI 251 Political Philosophy: Machiavelli to Burke (S; 3) 

This course traces the origins of some modern conceptions of law 
and the state, the sources and limits of political authority through 
some of the great modern political philosophers, relating these 
to the classical Aristotelian tradition. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 

PI 254 After Death and Dying (S; 3) 

An exploration of life after death, including such questions as: 
What difference does confronting death make? Is death a hole or 
a door? How are the meaning of life and the meaning of death 
connected? Do we really want to live forever? How is "Heaven" 
different from the genetic promise of an "immortality pill"? 

Peter J. Kreeft 

PI 255 The Meaning of Life (F; 3) 

This is surely the primary question, and all major philosophers 
have explored it, usually in the form of the summum bonum, or 
greatest value. We will survey Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Solomon, 
Jesus, Augustine, Aquinas, Freud, Marx, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard 
and Buddha as alternative or complimentary answers. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Peter J. Kreeft 

PI 257 Oriental Philosophy (F; 3) 

An empathetic and respectful but critical and questioning inves- 
tigation of the central claims of Hinduism, Buddhism (including 



62 / Arts and Sciences 

PHILOSOPHY 



Zen and Tibetan Buddhism) and Taoism regarding the nature of 

reality, the self and its destiny, including treatment of mysticism 

and the occult and comparison with Western philosophy and 

religion. 

Offered Fall, 1983 Peter/. Kree/t 

PI 259 (Sc 250, Th 248) Perspectives on War, Aggression and 
ConflictResolution I (F; 3) 

This course is the result of work by faculty and students interested 
in developing an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Peace 
and War at Boston College. The Boston College Program for the 
Study of Peace and War sponsors this course as one of the two 
introductory offerings in Peace Studies at the university (PER- 
SPECTIVES, part II is offered in the spring semester). PERSPEC- 
TIVES I is centered around analyses of the causes of war and 
conflict in contemporary society. Rein A. l/ritam 

PI 261 The Creative Person (S; 3) 

A creative person is one whose personhood is active, released, 
and known. The most important question here is not 'what' or 
even 'why' but 'how.' This is a course in actual, philosophically- 
significant experiment, followed by reflection — experiments in 
self-discovery in four dimensions: relation to yourself, others, 
nature, and God. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Peter/. Kree/t 

PI 264 Logic (F, S; 3) 

This course will consider the principles of correct reasoning to- 
gether with their application to concrete cases. 

William J. Haggerty 

PI 267 Aristotelian and Propositional Logic (F; S; 3) 

The principles and rules of deduction and the study of fallacies 
in both logics. Joseph Barrett, S.J. 

PI 269 (Sc 251, Th 250) Perspectives on War, Aggression, 
and Conflict Resolution II (S; 3) 

An interdisciplinary course that is concerned primarily with al- 
ternatives and "solutions" to the problem of war, including those 
advanced in the past and present, but also ones that may be 
required to meet the needs of the changing world of the future. 

Rein A. Uritam 

PI 275 Philosophy in Literature: Tolkien (S; 3) 

A complete philosophical world and life view underlies Tolkien's 
two great epics, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion: a 
synthesis of ingredients in Plato (exemplarism), Jung (arche- 
types); Romanticism (sehnsucht) and Norse mythology (a Stoic 
heroism) catalyzed by a Biblical imagination and a Heideggerian 
linguistic. The student will learn to recognize these and many 
other strange creatures in exploring Tolkien's world. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Peter /. Kree/t 

PI 278 Philosophy of Woman (F, S; 3) 

"The proper study of mankind is man", wrote Alexander Pope 
in his Essay On Man. Of course, it is common knowledge that 
Mr. Pope interpreted "man" generically. But the concept of man 
is construed primarily as male "while the concept of woman has 
been considered only peripherally, uncritically, or not at all". We 
need to clarify the concept of woman, WHY IS THIS CONCERN 
A PROPER PHILOSOPHICAL CONCERN TO BOTH WOMEN 
AND MEN? 

A partial answer to this question is found in the act of philos- 
ophizing. Philosophers scrutinize various ways of thinking about 
the world. They analyze concepts. Thus, in studying the "Phi- 
losophy of Woman", we are directing our attention not to women 
themselves, but to ways of thinking about women. In a word, we 
will, together, attempt to understand our understanding of 
woman. To aid us in this enterprise, we will call upon such 
thinkers as: Plato, Aristotle, J.S. Mill, Schopenhauer, Simone de 
Beauvoir, Germaine Greer, Hilda Heine, AND MORE!!! 

Patricia Bowen 

Pi 284 Examination of Self-Knowing (F; 3) 

A study of self-knowledge as found in Aristotle and Aquinas with 
special emphasis on personal, concrete experiences. Attention 



will be paid to contemporary contributions by Lonergan, Grisez, 

Hoenen and Dewart. 

Offered Fall, 1983 Joseph H. Casey, S.J. 

PI 285 Contemporary Ethical Perspectives (F, S; 3) 

A study of modern ethical problems, such as civil disobedience, 
mercy-killing, ethics in business and government, the ethics of 
socialism and communism, abortion, personal ethics, as affected 
by various philosophical systems along with an analysis of ethical 
values, as established by traditional and modern philosophy, in 
an attempt to build a helpful personal and social value system. 

Charles B. Toomey, S.J. 

PI 296 Linguistic Analysis and the Problem of God (S; 3) 

Problems about knowledge of and language about God which 
have arisen from the later thought of Wittgenstein will be treated. 
Authors like Wittgenstein, Ryle, Ayer, Flew, Austin and Mac- 
quarrie will be examined. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Joseph H. Casey, S.J. 



PI 299 Readings and Research 

By arrangement 



(F, S; 3) 



The Department 



PI 303 Philosophical Questions in Religion (F; 3) 

This course is for students who want to form their individual 
opinions rationally on such controversial religious topics as the 
psychology of belief, the problem of evil, arguments for God's 
existence, our knowledge of God, predestination and free will, 
time and eternity, life after death, miracles, the reliability of the 
Bible, mysticism, Eastern vs. Western religions. A problem-ori- 
ented textbook is supplemented by readings in C. S. Lewis and 
Thomas Aquinas. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Peter/. Kree/t 

PI 306 Ancient Greek Philosophy (F; 3) 

A history of the development of Classical Greek philosophy from 
the era of the Pre-Socratics to the closing of the Pagan schools in 
Athens in the 6th Century A.D. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Stuart B. Martin 

PI 308 The Political Thought of the Greeks (S; 3) 

An examination of Greek political philosophy, with special em- 
phasis on Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Politics; an attempt to 
apply the resources of Greek thought to some of the perennial 
issues of political philosophy. Arthur Madigan, S.J. 

PI 309 Marriage and the Family (S; 3) 

The course is designed, from a philosophical perspective, to ex- 
plore the full significance of the most fundamental and intimate 
human relationship: Marriage/Family, on both institutional and 
personal levels. 

The entire course consists of four parts: (1) It begins with a 
cross-cultural understanding of marriage/family by examining 
some of its many cultural variations. (2) Next, we will focus on 
the American traditional marriage/family and see why and how 
it has evolved into its present form, i.e., nuclear system. (3) Thirdly, 
we will try to examine the personal dimension of marriage/family 
and study how interpersonal interactions take place within the 
context of marriage/family. (4) Finally, we will organize a two- 
day seminar to which students will invite speakers of different 
marital (and non-marital) status to share their personal experience 
(both positive and negative) as well as their insights into this very 
foundation of human life. Francis Y. Soo 

PI 314 Immortality: What are the Chances? (S; 3) 

A discussion of the possibility of life after death. 

Ronald K. Tacelli 

PI 315 Aristotle (S; 3) 

A study of the development of Aristotle's fundamental doctrinal 
position; the authenticity and reliability of his extant works; the 
import of his logic for the rise of the mediaeval universities; his 
doctrine of equivocity; the central meaning of "being" in his 
Metaphysics; selected physical doctrines such as "change" and 
"time"; the goal of human existence expounded in the Nicoma- 
chean Ethics; Aristotle's teaching about the nature of the "intel- 



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PHILOSOPHY 



lect"; and some study of the subsequent (Greek, Arabian and 

Latin) commentators on his works. 

Offered Spring, 1984 Stuart B. Martin 

Pi 318 Origins of Romanticism (F; 3) 

Much of the present-day preoccupation with science-fiction, with 
ecological problems, and with the "scientific-technological rev- 
olution" finds its intellectual ground in Friedrich Wilhelm von 
Schelling's reappropriation of German mysticism (Tauler, Seuse, 
Boehme). We will examine this reappropriation as well as its role 
in the formation of Romanticism and neo-Romantic ideologies. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Thomas J. Blakeley 

PI 323 Plato's Republic (S; 3) 

An in-depth study of the most influential work in the entire his- 
tory of philosophy. Peter /. Kreeft 

Pi 324 Philosophy of God Experience (S; 3) 

Distinguishing between knowing God and knowing about God, 
the starting point for this course will be religious experiences. 
We will stay as close as possible to these experiences exploring 
the reasons for justifying the interpreting of them as a God ex- 
perience. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Joseph H. Casey, S.J. 

PI 333 American Theatre and Philosophy I (F; 3) 

Issue: The human person. What dimensions of the human person 
are found in today's drama? To find the answer plays will be 
studied by authors such as Lanford Wilson, Sam Shepard, David 
Mamet, Albert Innaurato. 

The answer will be evaluated. The students will be directed to 
two kinds of readings. First, readings in which the person is 
perceived to have richer dimensions such as Augustine, Confes- 
sions, C. S. Lewis, Surprised By Joy, Kierkegaard, Either/Or. Other 
readings will explain the contemporary understanding of being 
human such as Murray, The Problem of God, G. Marcel, Prob- 
lematic Man, Catholic/Humanist Dialogue, Dunne, A Search for 
God in Time and Memory, Tyrrell, B. Lonergan's Philosophy of 
God, Grisez, Beyond the New Theism. Joseph H. Casey, S.J. 

PI 334 American Theatre and Philosophy II (S; 3) 

Issue: Dying and Killing. Plays successful on the American stage 
will be used to reveal the American perspective on dying or/and 
suicide and euthanasia. The theoretical presuppositions of the 
American perspective will be extracted and studied as philo- 
sophical issues. 

Dying: Plays such as Shadow Box, All Over, Lady from Duluth, 
Camino Real, On Golden Pond, Wings, Lazarus Laughed. Suicide/ 
Euthanasia: Plays such as The Zoo Story, Death of a Salesman, 
Whose Life Is it Anyway?, The Elephant Man. Philosophical 
Works: Plato, Crito, Phaedo, Kreeft, Love Is Stronger Than Death, 
Rahner, On the Theology of Death, Crisez-Boyle, Life and Death 
with Liberty and Justice. 

Collateral reading: Kubler-Ross, On Death and Dying, Moody, 
Life After Life. Joseph H. Casey, S.J. 

PI 335 Platonic Dialogues (F; 3) 

This course is an inquiry into the developing thought of Plato, 
stressing particularly Plato's probing into the questions of the 
nature of man, the relation of the individual to society, the nature 
of human knowing, the foundation of judgments of value, and 
the meaning of a virtuous life. The course will include nearly all 
of what are called the early and middle dialogues of Plato, up to 
and including the Republic. The basic thrust of the course will 
be two-fold: first, to understand Plato's thought as this unfolds 
in each dialogue, and second, to appropriate this thought in an 
understanding of the context of our own time. 

This course is intended for students who are beginning Plato 
or at least have not studied him in depth. No knowledge of Greek 
is required. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 

PI 338 The Heidegger Project I (F; 3) 

This is a course designed to allow undergraduates an opportunity 
to work closely with the major texts of Martin Heidegger, one of 
the leading twentieth-century philosophers. Students will be ex- 
pected to participate in assessing Heidegger's relevance to con- 
temporary issues and in developing their own philosophical 
views vis-a-vis Heidegger's. Some knowledge of traditional phi- 



losophy (e.g. Aristotle, Descartes, etc.) would be helpful, but is 
not an absolute prerequisite. Thomas J. Owens 

PI 339 The Heidegger Project II (S; 3) 

A continuation of PI 338, open only to students participating in 
the course. Thomas J. Owens 

PI 340 Philosophy in the Middle Ages I and II (F, S; 3, 3) 

The examination of the perspectives on God, man and the cosmos 
from Augustine to Ockham. Norman J. Wells 

PI 344 The Aristotelian Ethics (F; 3) 

Reading of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, and examination of 
its principle themes: happiness, virtue, responsibility, justice, 
moral weakness, friendship, pleasure, contemplation. Arthur R. 
Madigan, S.J. 

PI 353 Man in Medieval Thought (S; 3) 

Jumping off from the Condemnation of 1277, the medieval dis- 
cussions about the agent intellect (one for all men?) will be ex- 
amined, along with the tradition on divine illumination. The 
background of this in Aristotle, Augustine and the Islamic think- 
ers will be developed. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Norman J. Wells 

PI 354 The Christian Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas (S; 3) 

A detailed examination of the major philosophical positions of 

Aquinas and their relevance to Modern Thomism. 

Offered Spring, 1984 Normal J. Wells 

PI 358 The Confessions of St. Augustine (F; 3) 

The reflective study of the Christian Neoplatonism of Augustine's 
Confessions with a stress on understanding Augustine in the light 
of his background of conservative African Christianity, Mani- 
cheanism, classical literary education and Neoplatonic philoso- 
phy. The chief emphasis will be on the text of the Confessions 
in translation, but there will also be some reading of other texts 
of Augustine's early works. 

Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 

PI 365 Aquinas Revisited (S; 3) 

A textual analysis of the thought of St. Thomas on the problem 
of knowledge and willing. The lectures will give historical back- 
ground for the understanding of the texts and will show the need 
to update the thought of Aquinas in the light of new scientific 
achievements and the evolution of philosophical reflection. Cer- 
tain key ideas on Aquinas that help to understand contemporary 
problems will be stressed. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Frederick J. Adelmann, S.J. 

Pi 375 Modern Philosophy I: Descartes and British Empiricists 
(F;3) 

A detailed examination of the classical positions taken during 

this period on the self, God, man and the world. 

Offered Fall, 1983 Norman J. Wells 

PI 376 Modern Philosophy II: British Empiricists to Kant (S; 3) 

Continuation of the previous semester, PI 375. 

Offered Spring, 1984 Norman J. Wells 

PI 378 Hume and Kant (F; 3) 

The course will present a confrontation between Hume's empir- 
icism and Kant's rationalism. The theme of this confrontation 
will not be drawn merely from the differences in both philoso- 
phers' theory of knowledge but perhaps more emphatically from 
the realm of ethics or moral philosophy. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Richard T. Murphy 

PI 379 Socrates and Jesus (F; 3) 

Purpose: to make the acquaintance of and to compare the two 
most influential people who ever lived, the inventor of reason 
and the object of faith; philosophy and religion compared at their 
source. Intensive reading and discussion of Great Dialogues of 
Plato and John's Gospel. Peter J. Kreeft 

PI 381 Philosophy of Being I (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: at least three courses in philosophy. 

A systematic discussion of validity and method in metaphysics 

(the question of being), analogy (the notion of being), activity, 



64 / Arts and Sciences 

PHILOSOPHY 



unity, truth and goodness (the properties of being), and becoming 

(the structures of being). 

Offered Fall, 1983 OJiva Blanchette 

PI 382 Philosophy of Being II (S; 3) 

A continuation of Philosophy of Being I with a discussion of 
causality and finality as categories of nature and history (the 
communication of being), and of the ultimate meaning of being 
(the summit of being). The latter part of the course will treat of 
the philosophy of religion in the framework of the notion of being. 
Offered Spring, 1984 OJiva Blanchette 

Pi 390 Neo-Marxism and the Thought of Marcuse (S; 3) 

Neo-Marxism as it has developed in the West among intellectuals 
has broken away from rigid Marxism-Leninism. In its new em- 
phasis on humanism and the person it is indebted to the early 
writings of Marx and the influence of the Frankfurt School in 
particular. This course will study especially the thought of Mar- 
cuse as it has affected many thinkers on the contemporary scene. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Frederick /. Adelmann, S.J. 

PI 395 Philosophy of Dostoevsky (S; 3) 

The aim of this course is the examination of the major philo- 
sophical positions of Dostoevsky. The course will offer a detailed 
analysis of the "Grand Inquisitor". The following issues will be 
examined: the critique of the Catholic Church, the struggle be- 
tween good and evil, the conflict between freedom and happiness, 
and Dostoevsky's dialectical approach. Joseph L. Navickas 

PI 406 Seminar on Life After Death (S; 3) 

Papers (both systematic-original and historical-research) on: tra- 
ditional and non-traditional arguments pro and con life after 
death; comparison of religions on this issue; out-of-body expe- 
riences; the evidence of mysticism; the relevance of immortality 
to the present; the nature of Heaven and Hell. 
Offered Soring, 1984 Peter J. Kreeft 

Pi 415 Great Trials in Western Civilization (F; 3) 

Since the time of Socrates, many of the central issues of human 
existence have been raised and treated in judicial trials. After an 
initial consideration of Kafka's The Trial, this course will ex- 
amine the development of our sense of moral judgment by a study 
of significant trials which have taken place in western civiliza- 
tion. Among those to be considered and the issues raised by them 
are: the trial of Galileo (science and religion), Dred Scott (racism), 
Louis XVI (revolution and justice), Dreyfus (anti-semitism), Nu- 
remberg trials (war and responsibility), Eichmann (modern forms 
of evil). James Bernauer, S.J. 

Pi 418 Later Greek Philosophy: The Search for Meaning (S; 3) 

In their different ways, the Stoics, Epicureans, Sceptics, and Pla- 
tonists were engaged in search for human meaning. Our aims: to 
follow these philosophers in their quest for meaning; to under- 
stand the reactions of Jewish and Christian thinkers; to see how 
the later Greek quest for meaning relates to modern quests, for 
example, that of Viktor Frankl. Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PI 419 Kant and Hegel (F; 3) 

An analysis and comparison of the major themes in Kant and 

Hegel. 

Offered Fall, 1983 Joseph L. Navickas 

PI 421 Nietzsche-Prophet of Nihilism (S; 3) 

An introduction to the central ideas of this highly controversial 
philosopher. The standard interpretation of Nietzsche as the 
prophet of twentieth-century nihilism will be followed by an 
examination of the original and distinctive interpretation made 
by Heidegger. Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PI 423 Introduction to Analytic Philosophy (F; 3) 

The main currents in analytic philosophy, now dominant in 
America and England, will be presented in their historical de- 
velopment. G.E. Moore's impact will be examined first. The in- 
fluence of Bertrand Russell, especially on logical atomism, will 
be assessed. Logical positivism, particularly in the works of Ayer 
and Carnap, will be treated in detail. Finally, the contributions 



of Wittgenstein and ordinary language philosophers will be dis- 
cussed. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Richard T. Murphy 

PI 424 The Phenomenology of Love (S; 3) 

This course will examine the new philosophy of love that 
emerged in the writings of the German phenomenologist Max 
Scheler and the Russian philosopher Vladimir Solovyov. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Joseph L. Navickas 

PI 427 Existential Psychology (S; 3) 

Existential psychology is a "union" of two disciplines, psychol- 
ogy and the philosophies of existentialism. It deals with such 
psychological topics as "experience," anxiety, freedom, etc., but 
is concerned with understanding these aspects of man's life on 
the deeper level of philosophy. Writings of Rollo May, Binswan- 
ger, Heidegger, Boss, Laing and others will be considered. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Daniel J. Shine, S.J. 

PI 429 Freud and Philosophy (S; 3) 

A reading of Freud's principal works will show how psychoan- 
alytic theory has altered our self-understanding. The interpreta- 
tion of dreams and pathological behavior leads to new theories 
of symbolic expression in work, play, humour and art. The anal- 
ysis of sexuality culminates in controversial views on guilt, viol- 
ence, the status of women and religious faith. 

Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PI 431 Philosophy of Karl Jaspers (F; 3) 

The course examines Jaspers' idea of philosophy. It seeks to in- 
vestigate the meaning and functions of the crucial concepts of 
Existenz, Encompassing, Reason. Philosophical Faith, Ultimate 
Situation, Cipher and Foundering. The course aims also at a better 
understanding of the relation between Jaspers' views and those 
of Kant, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Joseph L. Navickas 

PI 434 Topics in Contemporary Science (S; 3) 

Contemporary developments in physics and biology will be ex- 
plored intensively. Emphasis will be placed upon understanding 
the basic concepts, rather than the complex totality, of relativity 
theory, quantum theory, theories of the "origin of life," etc. Phil- 
osophical questions concerning objectivity and reality raised by 
these developments will be discussed. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Patrick H. Byrne 

PI 440 Existential Humanism (S; 3) 

The existentialists have focused on the dramatic plight of twen- 
tieth-century man. They have presented forcefully man's struggle 
for meaning for life in a technologically dominated society and 
in a nuclear age. This course hopes to reveal and evaluate the 
specific features this "philosophy of crisis" has claimed to be 
distinctive of human living in this present moment of history. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Richard T. Murphy 

PI 445 The Origins of American Pragmatism (F; 3) 

Pragmatism is the most characteristic expression of American 
life, its civilization and its mind. A reading of selected works of 
Dewey and James should provide an introduction to the pragmatic 
method of philosophizing and a framework for a discussion of 
the place of pragmatism in American culture. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PI 449 Practical Problems in Business Ethics (S; 3) 

This course will focus on some practical problems in business 
ethics, making use of concrete cases to illustrate the ethical rea- 
soning involved, and its application to actual situations. The em- 
phasis will be on reaching as definite conclusions as possible on 
some contemporary problems in business ethics. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 

Pi 450 Phenomenology and Intersubjectivity (F; 3) 

Communication between persons, dialogue, love — these are ma- 
jor categories in any attempt to analyze the roots of the social 
conflicts that beset the twentieth-century world. This course will 
examine the widely different attempts made by contemporary 



Arts and Sciences / 65 

PHILOSOPHY 



phenomenologists to explore the extent and limits of interper- 
sonal relationships. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Thomas J. Owens 

PI 451 Health Care Ethics (S; 3) 

Starting from a reflection on the basic structure of moral judge- 
ment, the course will move into a discussion of two general areas 
of moral questioning concerning the care of human life: (1) ques- 
tions arising from the development of technology and science 
having to do with genetic control, organ transplants, preventive 
medicine, and the ends of information-gathering about people; 
and (2) questions connected with the care of the sick and dying, 
the idea of health or human wholeness, the social structures af- 
fecting health care in hospitals, labeling, professional dominance, 
the experience of death, and abortion. 
Offered Spring, 1984 OJiva Blanchette 

Pi 452 Perspectives on Addiction (S; 3) 

This course attempts to apply the ordering and integrating func- 
tion of philosophy to the multifaceted problem of addiction. The 
chief focus is on alcoholic addiction, but includes addiction to 
other drugs as well. Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 

PI 455 Kierkegaard and Nietzsche (S; 3) 

Kierkegaard and Nietzsche are the two most important giants of 
thought in the nineteenth century and the two leading influences 
on contemporary thought. This course will study their lives and 
the predominant themes of their thought along the lines of Chris- 
tian belief and Atheistic Humanism. The class will include lec- 
tures, student reports, and analyses of some of their important 
writings. 

Stuart Martin 

PI 458 German Existentialism (F; 3) 

This course will study the profound analyses of modern man as 
expounded by the two leading figures of German Existentialism, 
Heidegger and Jaspers. The course will include introductory lec- 
tures, student seminar reports and analyses of some of their major 
writings. 
Offered Fall, 1983 

PI 467 Jean-Paul Sartre (S; 3) 

An analysis of Sartre's early writings on imagination and con- 
sciousness. Emphasis will be placed upon his penetrating studies 
of freedom, bad faith and the sado-masochistic dimensions of 
interpersonal relations. Both literary and philosophical texts will 
be discussed. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PI 472 Science and Religion (S; 3) 

The religious roots of ancient and modern scientific thought will 
be presented. The origins of the assumption that modern science 
and religion are basically incompatible will be traced, with a view 
toward a new understanding of their relation. Out of this new 
understanding, the possibility of religion's contribution to the 
problem of the misuse of science will be explored. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Patrick H. Byrne 

PI 473 Kierkegaard: Philosopher, Poet, Theologian (F; 3) 

After considering the significant events in Kierkegaard's life and 
some of the key influences on his thought (e.g., Luther, Lessing, 
Hegel), we will examine the main themes of his extensive corpus. 
Special attention will be given to issues such as the relationship 
between time and the self, the stages of human development, and 
Kierkegaard's notion of faith and Christian commitment. Some 
of the works to be considered include The Sickness l/nto Death, 
The Concept of Dread, Repetition, Either/Or, and Concluding 
l/nscienti/ic Postscript. Richard Spinello, S.J. 

PI 484 Greek Tragedy and Greek Philosophy (F; 3) 

While Greek tragedy is far from a mere dramatization of philo- 
sophical theses, it does raise philosophical issues. The aims of 
this course are: to become better acquainted with Greek tragedy, 
and more alert to the philosophical issues it raises, and to see 
how these issues shaped the thought of Plato and Aristotle and 
how they might affect our own thought. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PI 485 Philosophy of Comparative Religions — East & West (S; 3) 

This course has a twofold purpose. First, it explores one of the 
fundamental questions in philosophy: the religious or a-religious 



nature of man. Is man essentially a religious being, and hence is 
self-sufficient per se. Or is man essentially an a-religious being, 
and hence is self-sufficient per se. Secondly, this course is also 
a comparative study of philosophies of Western and Eastern re- 
ligions. Five of the world's major living religions (Judaism, Chris- 
tianity, Taoism, Buddhism and Shintoism) will be studied 
separately, and then follows a comparative evaluation of them. 
It is hoped that a synthetic understanding of the religious or a- 
religious nature of man would be achieved. Francis Y. Soo 

PI 491 Philosophy and Power (F; 3) 

Philosophy has played a decisive role in the formulation of the 
principles for each of the major political movements of our age: 
Liberalism, Fascism, Communism. This course will study these 
principles in the interest of discovering certain key relationships 
between expressions of philosophical thought and practices of 
political power. 
Offered Fall, 1983 James Bernauer, S. J. 

Pi 495 Metaphor and Interpretation (S; 3) 

A metaphor is "a poem in miniature." Hence, a satisfactory anal- 
ysis of metaphor requires a study of the creation of meaning in 
language. This course will bring together representative view- 
points on metaphor from the fields of linguistics, literary criticism 
and the philosophy of language. The role of metaphor in philo- 
sophic discourse will also be discussed. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PI 502 Pre-Marxist Russian Philosophy (S; 3) 

The course provides an historical survey of the various doctrines, 
insights, and trends in the pre-revolutionary Russian thought. A 
special attention will be given to the philosophy of Skovoroda, 
Chaadaev, Herzen, Dostoevsky, and Solovyov. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Joseph L. Navickas 

PI 509 Marx and Weber: The Origins of Society (F; 3) 

A comparison of the way in which these two men approach the 

question of the origin of modern society. 

Offered Fall, 1983 David M. Rasmussen 

PI 512 Virtue and Pleasure (S; 3) 

An examination of how Plato, Aristotle, and Epicurus related 
virtue and vice to pleasure and pain, and of how well or ill they 
succeeded. Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PI 513-514 Contemporary French Philosophy I & II (F, S; 3, 3) 

During the past few decades, French philosophical reflection has 
had an extraordinary impact on our self-understanding. A com- 
bination of original thought and brilliant style created a living 
philosophy, assured of a wide international audience and an un- 
usually immediate cultural influence. Writers like Camus, Sartre, 
De Beauvoir, Levi-Strauss and Foucault have shaped the ways in 
which we think about many of the great ethical issues of our day. 
This two-semester course will be offered in French. The readings 
have been selected both for their lucid style and engaging content. 
Discussions and examinations will be conducted in French. 

Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PI 520 Basic Marxist Thought (F; 3) 

An examination of the development of the thought of Karl Marx 

from The Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts through Kap- 

ital. 

Offered Fall, 1983 David M. Rasmussen 

PI 523 The Prison Experience (S; 3) 

An examination of the prison experience from a variety of per- 
spectives: historical, sociological, literary, cinematic and philo- 
sophical. Initially, the course will investigate the historical 
appearance of the prison institution as a common form of pun- 
ishment. We shall then consider the literature produced from 
within the prison experience and recent cinematic expressions 
of its meaning. Finally, we will study the model of rationality 
contemporaneous with the birth of the prison and the philo- 
sophical sources of penology as human science. 
Offered Spring, 1984 James Bernauer, S.J. 

PI 525 Revolution and Counter-revolt (S; 3) 

There will be five general topics covered in the lectures: 1) Mar- 
cuse and the Neo-Marxists 2) The Modern Humanists, and the 



66 / Arts and Sciences 

PHILOSOPHY 



dying Liberals 3) The Problems of Methodology 4) The God Prob- 
lem, 5) The Problem of Dialogue and Detente. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Frederick /. Adelmann, S.J. 

PI 528 Metaphysics of Praxis (F; 3) 

A study of the concrete approach to transcendence through hu- 
man action as found in Maurice Blondel's science of practice and 
its relation to practical science. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Oliva Blanchette 

PI 534 Community and Law (S; 3) 

Starting from the understanding of "community" and "society" 
in sociological analysis, the course will move into a more radical 
reflection on community as an experience of liberation as well 
as of sociality, and from this reflection will attempt to account 
for the need of authority and law as the historical means for the 
good of communion. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Oliva Blanchette 

Pi 538 Law, Business and Society (S; 3) 

This course is to explore the relationship and interaction among 
Law, Business and Society, i.e., among the political, economic 
and social spheres of human life. 

Starting from the notion of law and (human) rights, the course 
will move into a critical reflection on various forms of societies — 
Greek, Medieval, Modern and Contemporary — -as developed 
throughout history. It will examine how, in each of the above 
societies, law originated, developed and was manifested within 
concrete economic and social structures. Francis Y. Soo 

PI 540 Education and Revolution (S; 3) 

A discussion of the origins of revolutionary action in the con- 
sciousness of oppression and in the effort to articulate common 
problems to be resolved by a community, and of the role of "ed- 
ucators" and "education" in fostering or frustrating this process. 
Readings will include Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed, 
Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth, Malcolm X's Autobiography, 
and others. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Oliva Blanchette 

PI 542 Science and Society (S; 3) 

The course will explore the interrelation of scientific knowledge 
and technology, and the structures and institutions of society as 
found in a variety of historical and cultural settings. In particular 
the question of the use of scientific knowledge for good or evil 
in our present era will be posed. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Patrick H. Byrne 

PI 543 20th-century Thought (F; 3) 

Over the course of the 20th century thus far, four main currents 
have been confronting each other or living in reciprocal ignorance 
one of the other. We examine here the origins of each of the four 
(neo-Thomism, neopositivism, phenomenology, the Marxisms), 
their interplay, and the central issues that occupy them: problems 
of man, nature, society and God. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Thomas Blakeley 

PI 545 Social Philosophy in Classical Antiquity (S; 3) 

A study of ancient man's outlook on man-in-society and the poJis 
starting from Hesiod and other early poets or other pre-Socratic 
wise men down to Attic tragedy and the political philosophies 
of Plato, Aristotle and Cicero. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Oliva Blanchette 

PI 546 19th Century Philosophy (S; 3) 

A survey of some of the key figures who contributed to the great 
intellectual revolution of 19th century Europe. We will discuss 
some of the writings of Hegel, Feuerbach, Strauss, Marx, Kier- 
kegaard, and Nietzsche. Special consideration will be given to 
the critique of Christianity and culture which emerges in these 
writings. Richard A. SpinelJo, S.J. 

PI 554 Philosophy of Poetry and Music (F; 3) 

This course will deal with the history of poetry, painting, sculp- 
ture, architecture, music and dance. A major perspective will be 
the interrelation of these art forms to their respective cultural 



periods. Students will be encouraged to work out their own proj- 
ects or to select studies on Eastern or Western Art. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Joseph Flanagan, S.J. 

PI 557 Logic for Human and Machine (S; 3) 

An introduction to formal logic, designed to familiarize students 
with the expression of ordinary statements in symbolic form, with 
truthtables, and with other such basic logical themes. Particular 
stress will lie on practical exercises, both on the PDP-11 70 and 
on the VAX-11, so as to examine how Aristotelian and Boolean 
logics perform in a time-sharing context. Thomas Blakeley 

Pi 561 Freud and Phenomenology (F; 3) 

The course will present the chief principles and concepts be- 
longing to the method of psychoanalysis developed by Sigmund 
Freud. After the close examination of his general psychological 
theory a philosophical critique of the Freudian method will be 
given from the phenomenological viewpoint. This critique will 
introduce a brief sketch of the phenomenological method as ap- 
plied in existential analysis. Richard T. Murphy 

PI 563 The Great Philosophers I (F; 3) 

The course is designed for philosophy majors and interested sen- 
iors. It is an attempt to provide inquisitive and historically ori- 
ented students with a full year survey of the major thinkers in 
the Western tradition. The principal objective of this course is to 
trace the development of philosophy beginning with the pre- 
Socratics and moving up through the medievals to the 
moderns. Joseph L. Navickas 

PI 564 The Great Philosophers II (S; 3) 

This course is a continuation of the Great Philosophers I. The 
purpose of the present course is to exhibit philosophy as the 
thought of remarkable individuals, not as an integral part of cul- 
tural, social, and political life. This purpose demands more ac- 
count of individual thought than is usually given by the 
historians. Joseph L. Navickas 

PI 571 Art and Science (S; 3) 

This course will explore possible relations between the human- 
ities and the natural sciences. Special emphasis will be given to 
the shift from classical to contemporary scientific theories of time 
and space and their artistic analogues. The course is experimental 
and students will be encouraged to work on personal projects. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Joseph Flanagan, S.J. 

PI 574 Approaches to Language (F; 3) 

A comparative study of the different but complementary tradi- 
tions in German, French and Anglo-Saxon philosophies of lan- 
guage. Emphasis will be placed upon the themes of symbolic 
expression underlying structural codes and the nature of the 
speech act. Essays by Cassirer, DeSaussure, Wittgenstein, Austin 
and Searle should provide a rich and varied backdrop for a dis- 
cussion of the mystery of human speech. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PI 577 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (F; 3) 

An introduction to formal logic, designed to familiarize students 
with the expression of ordinary statements in symbolic form, 
truth-tables, validity of arguments and proofs, quantification of 
predicates and relations (propositional functions). The impor- 
tance and limits of logical thinking will be discussed. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Patrick H. Byrne 

PI 578 Philosophy of Mathematics (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: PI 577 

A study of the formal foundations of arithmetic and geometry. 

Besides presenting in detail principles and theorems from these 

two areas, this course will investigate the nature of mathematical 

thought operative in these presentations. The contribution of 

David Hilbert to the understanding of mathematical thinking will 

be stressed. The relation between mathematics and the sciences 

will also be discussed. Though no particular mathematical topics 

beyond high school geometry will be presupposed, familiarity 

with mathematical thinking will be helpful. 

Offered Fall, 1983 Patrick H. Byrne 

PI 580 Philosophy of the Cinema (S; 3) 

The study of film has traditionally taken place in a closed uni- 
verse of discourse unrelated to developments in the larger realm 



Arts and Sciences / 67 

PHILOSOPHY 



of aesthetics. This course will attempt to relate philosophical 
theories of interpretation — structualism, phenomenology, psy- 
choanalysis — to the study of film aesthetics. A series of films will 
be shown and discussed. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PI 581 The Matter of life (F; 3) 

This course will provide an analysis of the process of biological 
thinking. After an historical introduction, in which some great 
biologists of the past (Galen, Harvey, Claude Bernard) as well as 
their specific approaches to the matter of life are reviewed, at- 
tention will focus on modern biological thinking: the rise of 
models and theories, the emergence of explanations, etc. A final 
section will deal with the limits of biological theory: how is the 
biological approach related to other sciences, how is the body 
related to "mind," etc. Geert Verschuuren 

PI 582 Contemporary Marxism (S; 3) 

This course will consider modern versions of Marxism as found 
in contemporary Russia (Soviet Philosophy) and contemporary 
movements in China. Also trends in the United States emanating 
from the thought of Marcuse will be considered. 

Frederick /. Adelmann, S.J. 

PI 587 Man and Evolution (F; 3) 

The point of depature of this course is the development of evo- 
lutionary theory since Darwin. After a critique of neo-Darwinism, 
its applicability to sociobiology will be investigated: To what 
extent are individual behavior and common culture biologically 
rooted? What are the consequences for the philosophical problem 
of human freedom and for the religious problem of creation? The 
course will end on a futuristic note: What consequences can be 
drawn in the area of public policy-making in issues affecting the 
future of human kind? Geert Verschuuren 

PI 594 Metaphysics (S; 3) 

First philosophy, or metaphysics, is the core of philosophic ac- 
tivity, its subject-matter being expressed as "being as being." We 
will make it our task to examine all the central issues of meta- 
physical concern: what is being? what are the main traits of being 
as being? what are the main types of being? what are the fun- 
damental operations of being as being? in what ways is being 
known? This systematic study will be complemented by some 
attention to the metaphysical principles of Aristotle, Thomas 
Aquinas, Nicolai Hartmann and Jean-Paul Sartre. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Thomas /. Blakeley 

PI 596 Intentionality and the Free Will (F; 3) 

The lectures will begin by discussing the notion of intentionality 
as found in St. Thomas and then as developed by Brentano and 
Husserl. The will theory discussed will have its roots in St. 
Thomas but then will be up-dated in the light of intentionality. 
The criticism of determinists like Skinner and of the Existen- 
tialists like Sarte will also enter into the final 
discussions. Frederick /. Adelmann, S.J. 

PI 602 Soviet Philosophy Today (F; 3) 

Among contemporary philosophical trends, Marxism-Leninism 
stands out not only as the most extensive but also as the most 
threatened by modern developments in science and society. 

We will examine its origins in the "classics of Marxism", its 
codification in the textbooks of the 1940's and 1950's, the "de- 
Stalinisation", ending up in "peaceful coexistence" and "detente". 

Emphasis will be on the Soviet ability to respond to the "sci- 
entific-technological revolution", to empirical sociology, to 
Freudian psychology, to East-European humanism, to dialogue 
and Christian renewal, as well as to more theoretical challenges; 
for example, from neopositivism and from neo-Marxism. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Thomas /. Blakeley 

PI 603 The Enlightenment and the Birth of Modernity (F; 3) 

A study of the birth of modern rationality in the period of the 
Enlightenment. The course will examine a variety of Eighteenth 
Century thinkers in the perspective of the age's major themes: 



God and Reason, Thought and Superstition, History and Progress, 

the Idea of Humanity. 

Offered Fall, 1983 James Bernauer, S. /. 

PI 604 Philosophy and History (F; 3) 

The first part of the course will aim to clarify the nature of his- 
torical understanding by examining the work of several histori- 
ans. We shall then consider several attempts (Hegel, Toynbee, 
Voegelin) to articulate a philosophical understanding of historical 
development. 
Offered Fall, 1983 James Bernauer, S. /. 

PI 609 The Greek Intellectual Adventure (F; 3) 

It would be hard to match the Greek thinkers of the sixth and 
fifth centuries B.C. for creativity and bold imagination. This 
course explores Greek philosophy up to Socrates with special 
emphasis on the Pre-Socratics and Sophists, and relevant back- 
ground from poetry, drama and history. 
Offered Fall, 1983 Arthur Madigan, S. /. 

Pi 612 Personality and The Human Sciences (S; 3) 

this course will study the role which three human sciences (an- 
thropology, psychology and sexology) have played in shaping our 
contemporary understanding of personality and in directing our 
philosophical questions with respect to it. 
Offered Spring, 1984 James Bernauer, S. J. 

PI 615 British Empiricism (S; 3) 

This course introduces British Empiricism through the exami- 
nation of the works of Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. These authors 
will be considered within their historical context. Their influence 
on contemporary philosophies will be evaluated. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Richard T. Murphy 

PI 616 The Development of The Will (F; 3) 

It may be news to us, but the idea of will had to be developed. 

How did this happen? We will try to answer this question through 

an examination of, among others, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the 

Stoics. 

Offered Fall, 1983 Arthur Madigan, S.J. 

Pi 617 Humanism and Anti-Humanism (S; 3) 

Humanism, an invention of Athens and Rome, received its most 
fundamental criticism in twentieth-century Paris. Initially, this 
course will examine the formation and development of western 
humanism and the challenge posed to it by the philosophies of 
Nietzsche and Heidegger. Most of the course will be spent in 
studying the attempt by contemporary French thinkers (Barthes, 
Foucault, Levi-Strauss) to articulate an authentically anti-hu- 
manistic philosophy. 
Offered Spring, 1984 James Bernauer, S.J. 

PI 622 Michel Foucault (S; 3) 

This course will study the works of Michel Foucault. We will 
examine his philosophical analysis of several modern forms of 
knowledge (psychology, medicine, penology, sexology) and the 
relationship of these human sciences to models of rationality and 
modes of political action. James Bernauer, S.J. 

PI 625 The Problem of Self Knowledge (S; 3) 

"The unexamined life is not worth living." Socrates' proclama- 
tion forms the basic assumption of this course. However, impor- 
tant developments in Western culture have made the approach 
to self-knowledge both more difficult and more essential. Stu- 
dents will be invited to discover in themselves dimensions of 
their subjectivity which lead to resolution of fundamental issues. 
The work of Bernard Lonergan will serve as a guide. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Patrick H. Byrne 

PI 626 Hannah Arendt (S; 3) 

An examination of Arendt's philosophical achievement: her treat- 
ment of the active life of labor, work, action, and the mind's life 
of thinking, willing, judging. In additional to reading her major 
texts, there will be- consideration of the political and philosoph- 
ical contexts within which she formulated her thought. 
Offered Spring, 1984 James Bernauer, S.J. 

PI 628 Ayer and Wittgenstein (S; 3) 

This course introduces Analytic Philosophy (now dominant in 
contemporary American philosophical circles) through the ex- 



68 / Arts and Sciences 

PHYSICS 



amination of the two most influential thinkers: Ayer and Witt- 
genstein. Since these philosophers have had such an impact, they 
will be considered within the historical context. 

Richard T. Murphy 

PI 630 Science and the Growth of Knowledge (F; 3) 

Stimulated by the appearance of T. S. Kuhn's The Structure of 
Scientific Revolutions, major developments in our thinking about 
science have taken place over the past two decades. These de- 
velopments have profoundly affected the social sciences as well 
as the natural sciences. This course will undertake a careful study 
of the major contributors to this new view — Kuhn, Popper, Lak- 
atos, Shapere, Feyerabend, Toulmin and Suppe — and situate their 
thinking in its historical context. 
Offered 1983 Patrick H. Byrne 

PI 638 Plato: Selected Dialogues (F; 3) 

A study of (at most) a half-dozen Platonic dialogues, chosen to 
suit the philosophical interests of instructor and students. For 
students with some background in Plato. Arthur R. Madigan, 
S.J. 

PI 640 The Evolution of Greek Metaphysics (S; 3) 

What is the root of the metaphysical impulse? How do meta- 
physical systems grow? These questions will guide a study of 
Paramenides, Heraclitus, the Atomists, Plato, Aristotle, and Plo- 
tinus. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Arthur Madigan, S.J. 

PI 642 The Critique of Historical Reason (S; 3) 

This course will consider the question, "How is the history of 
philosophy to be thought?" After an initial consideration of the 
work of Wilhelm Dilthey we shall focus upon the conflict of 
approaches between the American school of the history of ideas 
and the French school of structural analysis. Finally, there will 
be an examination of what principles guide the appropriation of 
the history of philosophy by contemporary philosophers and his- 
torians. 
Offered Spring, 1984 James Rernauer, S.J. 

Pi 645 Christian Existentialism: Pascal and Marcel (S; 3) 

A thoughtful and intensive study and discussion of two little 
masterpieces: Pascal's Pensees and Marcel's The Philosophy of 
Existentialism, emphasizing the issues of skepticism, values, self- 
knowledge, love, death, faith and freedom. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Peter/. Kreeft 

PI 647-648 Ethics and Politics I & II (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course will originally focus upon modern attempts to re- 
construct theories of ethical action in the context of political life 
dating from Kant to the present. Particular emphasis will be given 
to contemporary continental and Anglo-Saxon schools of thought. 
The first semester will focus upon the work of modern utilitari- 
ans, intuitionists and critical theorists. In particular, the work of 
both Jurgen Habermas and John Rawls will be highlighted. In the 
second semester we will consider ethics in historical perspective 
beginning with Plato and Aristotle and moving to the present. 
The overall concern of this two semester course will be to con- 
struct a model for ethical action based on hermeneutic, life-world 
and historic considerations. The course will be both lecture and 
seminar. It is intended for both graduate and advanced under- 
graduate students. David M. Rasmussen 

PI 650 Russian Cultural Philosophy (F; 3) 

This course provides an historical, continuing survey of the var- 
ious trends and developments in the pre-revolutionary, pre-Marx- 
ist Russian thinking. It seeks in every aspect of Russian thought 
the significance of culture for man and his social environment. 
A special attention will be given to the philosophy of Chaadaev, 
Lavrov, Chernyshevsky, and Dostoevsky. Joseph L. Navickas 

PI 654 The Emergence of Reality (F; 3) 

The theory of evolution profoundly affected the view of reality 
held in Western thought. The "process philosophies" which arose 
out of the new world-view continue to have an important impact 
upon psychology, literature and theology. This course will pro- 
vide a critical study of major process thinkers — especially A.N. 



Whitehead — and compare their views with more traditional 

views concerning being. 

Offered Fall, 1983 Patrick H. Rryne 

PI 657 Greek Ideas of the Divine (S; 3) 

How much of our thinking about God do we owe to the Greeks? 
We will try to answer that question through an examination of 
the gods and the Good in Plato, of Aristotle's First Mover, and 
of the Plotinian One. Special attention will be paid to the way 
in which a philosopher's view of the divine affects his view of 
the human condition. 
Offered Spring, 1984 Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PI 670 (Mc 670) (Sc 670) Technology and Culture (S; 3) 

This course examines the philosophical, psychological, social, 
legal and economic sources, impact and direction of modern tech- 
nology. Attention will focus upon the effects on the individual, 
society in general and on organizations. The student should ex- 
pect to raise and analyze significant issues in these areas. A per- 
son taking this course should have at least an elementary 
understanding of some aspect of applied modern technology (e.g. 
computers, mass communications, etc.), and an interest in where 
society is and is going in virtue of this burgeoning 
technology. William Griffith 

PI 680 The Phenomenology of Edmund Husserl (F; 3) 

A study of the major themes of Husserl's early works: intention- 
ality, time-consciousness, the interplay of experience and lan- 
guage, seeing as interpretation. Emphasis will be placed upon the 
ontological implications of phenomenology. 

Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PI 682 Towards an Ontology of Language (F; 3) 

An analysis of the problem of language focusing on recent Eu- 
ropean thinkers, including Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. 
Offered Fall, 1983 William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PI 683 Religion After Freud and Jung (F; 3) 

A critical examination of the influences of Freud and Jung in the 

area of religious attitudes and values. 

Offered Fall, 1983 William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PI 686 Hermeneutics (F; 3) 

An examination of a certain number of major issues in contem- 
porary theories of interpretation. William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PI 693 Merleau-Ponty and the Problem of Self (F; 3) 

A study of the major texts of Merleau-Ponty as they relate to the 

problems of the human self. 

Offered Fall, 1983 William J. Richardson, S.J. 



Physics 



Faculty 

Professor Robert L. Carovillano, Chairman of the Department 
A.B., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Professor Joseph H. Chen, B.S., Saint Procopius College; Ph.D., 
University of Notre Dame 

Professor Baldassare Di Bartolo, Dott. Ing., University of Palermo; 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor Robert L. Becker, B.S., Missouri Schools of 
Mines; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Associate Professor George J. Goldsmith, B.S., University of Ver- 
mont; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 

Associate Professor Francis McCaffrey, B.S., Providence College; 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Associate Professor Solomon L. Schwebel, B.S., City College of New 
York; M.S., Ph.D., New York University 

Associate Professor Rein A. Uritam, A.B., Concordia College; A.B., 
Oxford University; A.M., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Assistant Professor John H. Kinnier, S.J., B.S., A.B., A.M., Boston 



Arts and Sciences / 69 

PHYSICS 



College; M.S., Catholic University of America; S.T.L., Weston 
College 

Assistant Professor Francis A. Liuima, S.J., M.S., Boston College; 
Ph.D., St. Louis University 

Research Professor Pradip M. Bakshi, B.S., University of Bombay; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Research Professor Robert H. Eather, B.Sc, Newcastle, University 
College of the University of South Wales; Ph.D., University of 
South Wales 

Research Professor Gabor Kalman, D.Sc, Israel Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Research Associate and Lecturer Dennis Pacheco, A.B., Brown 
University; M.S., Ph.D., Boston College 



Program Description 

The Department of Physics offers alternative courses of study 
leading to the B.S. or the A.B. degree. 

The B.S. program is designed to prepare a student for advanced 
graduate studies and a professional career in physics. Minimum 
requirements in the B.S. program are adequate for students plan- 
ning on immediate employment upon graduation or undertaking 
certain career directions outside of physics. Courses are in clas- 
sical and modern physics and emphasize physical concepts and 
experimental methods. The laboratory program offers broad ex- 
perience in experimental physics and opportunity to work closely 
with faculty and graduate students on advanced research projects. 
Minimum degree requirements for the B.S. are: ten approved 
courses in physics of which at least eight are numbered above 
301; Ph 203-204, Ph 405-406, and with approval, either Ph 
505-506 or Ph 535; mathematics through the level of advanced 
calculus; and two courses in science outside of physics and di- 
rected at science majors. The course Ph 480 may be used to replace 
one semester of the advanced calculus requirement. The normal 
B.S. physics program includes the intermediate level courses Ph 
321, 322, 401, 402, 411, 412, plus approved electives. 

The A.B. program is intended for students who desire a com- 
prehensive understanding of physical science, but do not plan 
to do graduate work in physics. Minimum degree requirements 
for the A.B. are: eight approved courses in physics of which at 
least four are numbered above 212; two credits of introductory 
laboratory; Ph 405-406; two courses in calculus; and two courses 
in science outside of physics. 

A physics major with a satisfactory scholastic average (3.3 or 
higher) may apply for entry into the departmental honors pro- 
gram. Application must be made to the Undergraduate Affairs 
Committee no earlier than the beginning of junior year and no 
later than the first quarter of senior year. Each applicant must 
solicit a faculty advisor to supervise the proposed research proj- 
ect. Honors will be granted upon: a) Satisfactory completion of 
a thesis based on the research project; b) Demonstration through 
an oral examination of a broad comprehension of physics in gen- 
eral and the special field of the thesis. The examining committee 
shall be appointed by the chairperson and consist of a two mem- 
ber faculty Honors Committee and one additional examiner from 
the physics faculty or graduate student body. 



Course Offerings 

Courses numbered below 200 are introductory courses directed 
generally at non-science majors or A.B. physics majors. These 
courses have no prerequisites and utilize no mathematics beyond 
ordinary college entrance requirements. Introductory physics 
courses may be used to fulfill the university science core require- 
ment. Ph 209-210 Introductory Physics I, II (Calculus) or Ph 211- 
212 Introduction to Physics I, II (Calculus) and Ph 203-204 In- 
troductory Physics Laboratory I, II are required of all B.S. biology, 
chemistry and physics majors. Courses numbered above 301 are 
advanced offerings primarily for physics majors. 



Introductory Courses (Core) 

Ph 111-112 Physics for the Curious I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is designed to introduce the non-technically oriented 
student to physics. The scientific view of the world and the pro- 
cess by which physical laws are discovered are examined with 
a historical perspective. The impact on society and upon methods 
of thought and investigation of such great scientific ideas as Gal- 
ileo's conception of motion and Einstein's theory of relativity are 
broached. Areas of study include the microcosm of atoms and 
particles, planetary motion and structure of the solar system, the 
super macrocosm of stellar media, the modern conception of light, 
radiation and lasers. Recommended laboratory (optional): Ph 101- 
102 John H. Kinnier, S.J. 

Ph 115-116 Structure of the Universe I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

An introductory course directed at non-science majors. Physical 
principles are developed and applied to our space and astro- 
physical environment. Topics include: structure and evolution 
of the solar system; physics of the sun and planets; space dis- 
coveries; creation and structure of stars and galaxies; relativity 
and cosmology; extraterrestrial life; astronomical concepts. 

Michael Heinermann 

Ph 130 Ideas of 20th Century Physics (S; 3) 

A course for non-science majors who wish to become conversant 
with some of the leading ideas in contemporary science that have 
had a major impact on the modern world, presented in a way that 
a non-mathematically inclined student can understand. Some of 
the topics covered include the new ideas of space and time in 
Einstein's relativity, the non-intuitive concepts of causality in 
quantum physics, applications of these to atomic physics, nuclear 
weapons and nuclear power, and the highly exciting new dis- 
coveries and theories in space, such as pulsars, quasars, and black 
holes. Gabor Kalman 

Ph 131 Scientific Thought: Concepts and Growth 

The objective of this course is to illuminate those concepts and 
views of the physical world that play so large a part in our lives. 
Starting with the contributions of the Greeks and bringing it up 
to the present, the course will outline the role of mathematics, 
philosophy, astronomy, physics, chemistry, biology and geology 
in the formation of our present view of the world about us and 
the view we have of ourselves. The course is open to all students; 
there are no prerequisites. The emphasis will be on the concepts 
of the various sciences, not on their techniques. 

Ph 136-137 Space Exploration I, II (F; 3) 

This course deals with Space Age discoveries. Satellites have 
been used to explore wide areas of the solar system and of deep 
space; the results from space missions and from dramatic devel- 
opments in ground based observational capabilities provide the 
basis of the course. Physical concepts are developed in context, 
with an historical perspective provided from the ideas of the early 
astronomers and philosophers to the current space findings. Top- 
ics include the Sun-Earth system, including solar flares, the solar 
wind, the magnetosphere and auroras; comparative studies of the 
other planets; the Moon and planetary satellites; comets; X-ray, 
gamma ray and radio wave pictures of deep space. 

Robert H. Eather 

Ph 138 Science and Theology 

A study of the interrelationships existing between man and nature 
and God and nature, as conceived by the scientist and by the 
theologian. Scientific theories of the origin and continuing ex- 
istence of the universe will be related to the nature and action 
of a Supreme Being on a material world. Coordination of physical 
and theological concepts will be achieved through the use of 
elementary logical and metaphysical principles. 

Ph 168 Physical Principles in Medical Technology and in the 
Delivery of Health Care (S; 3) 

A course primarily designed for students in the School of Nursing 
consisting of an examination of physical principles of instru- 
mentation and practices commonly employed in medicine, such 
as traction, blood circulation, fluid pumps, suction and drainage, 
temperature measurements, optics of the eye, ultrasound, display 
instruments including graphic recorders and cathode ray tubes, 
electrocardiography and pacemakers, X-ray and nuclear radia- 



70 / Arts and Sciences 

PHYSICS 



tion. Demonstration of medical instruments. Films on relevant 
topics will be shown. Joseph H. Chen 

Ph 171-172 Energy and the Environment, a Technoscientific 
Perspective I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

A course primarily for non-science majors in which the cultural, 
historical and scientific origins of our contemporary technolog- 
ical society are explored; the fundamental principles of energy 
utilization examined; and the impact of technology on resources 
and the environment studied. Emphasis is on the people and 
processes of science-technology, and on the fundamental limi- 
tations to the availability of energy as a background to the in- 
vestigation of problems of population, resources, and pollution. 
Three lectures per week. George Goldsmith 

Ph 183-84 Foundations of Physics I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

An introduction to the principal concepts of classical and modern 
physics. Elementary algebra is used in this course but emphasis 
is on physical understanding rather than mathematical manip- 
ulation. Topics include mechanics, electricity and magnetism, 
heat, sound, optics, and some revolutionary 20th century ideas 
in relativity and quantum physics and their application to the 
subatomic world. Recommended Laboratory (optional): Ph 101- 
102. Robert L. Becker 

Ph 199 Special Projects (F; S) 

Individual programs of study and research under the direction 
of physics faculty members. Credits and requirements by arrange- 
ment with the approval of the chairperson. The Department 

Ph 209-210 Introductory Physics I, II (Calculus) (F, S; 4, 4) 

Prerequisite: Mt 100-101 (may be taken concurrently). 
A course primarily intended for those majoring in the physical 
sciences. The principal areas of physics will be covered at the 
introductory level with an orientation toward future study of 
these areas. Primary emphasis will be on classical mechanics and 
on electricity and magnetism, and also on wave phenomena, ther- 
modynamics, kinetic theory, optics, and topics in modern phys- 
ics. Four lectures per week. Recommended laboratory (optional): 
Ph 203-204. Dennis P. Pacheco 

Ph 211-212 Introduction to Physics I, II (Calculus) (F, S; 4, 4) 

Prerequisite: Mt 100-101 (may be taken concurrently). 
First Semester: An introduction to classical mechanics, including 
Newton's laws, energy, angular motion, oscillations and gravi- 
tation; wave motion acoustics, the kinetic theory of gases and 
thermodynamics. Second Semester: The fundamentals of elec- 
tricity and magnetism, electrical and magnetic properties of mat- 
ter, electromagnetism, electromagnetic oscillations and waves, 
geometrical optics and optical instruments, the wave properties 
of light, and selected topics in modern physics. Four lectures per 
week. Recommended laboratory (optional): Ph 203-204. 

The Department 

Electives (General) 

Ph 248 Computer Applications in Natural Sciences 

Prerequisite: Ph 209-210 or Ph 211-212 and calculus beyond the 
level of Mt 100-101. 

The student will become familiar with a high-level computer 
language designed for application in science, and with some 
mathematical procedures frequently utilized on computers, in- 
cluding numerical approximations, eigenvalue problems, fourier 
transforms, optimization and simulation. Also, assembly lan- 
guage for one microcomputer system will be employed, with at- 
tention to the procedures for the exchange of information between 
computers and various laboratory devices. The course should be 
equally useful to students majoring in any area of science; how- 
ever it is not intended to satisfy the minimum requirements for 
courses within any major. 

Ph 301 Introduction to the Principles and Techniques of 
Photography (F; 3) 

This course is designed to provide students in the arts, sciences 
and humanities with a working knowledge of photographic tech- 
niques and of the use of photography as a medium for artistic 
expression. It covers the techniques for utilization of common 
photographic equipment and materials as well as photography's 



historical origins and physical fundamentals. Practical experi- 
ence in darkroom procedures and in the utilization of various 
types of photographic apparatus is provided through laboratory 
exercises. No previous background in science or math is required. 
Enrollment limited. Two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Lab fee: $50.00. George J. Goldsmith 

Laboratory Offerings 

Ph 101-102 Basic Laboratory I, II (F, S; 1, 1) 

A course which provides laboratory demonstration of physical 
principles and demands minimal use of mathematics in inter- 
preting the results of experiments or demonstration experiments. 
One two-hour laboratory period per week. This course carries a 
laboratory fee. Francis McCaffrey 

Ph 203-204 Introductory Physics Laboratory I, II (F, S; 1, 1) 

A laboratory course which provides an opportunity to perform 
experiments on a wide range of topics in mechanics, electricity 
and magnetism, optics, acoustics, heat, and modern physics. One 
two-hour laboratory period per week. This lab is intended for 
students in Ph 209-210 or Ph 211-212. This course carries a lab- 
oratory fee. Francis McCaffrey 

Ph 405-406 Physics Laboratory I, II (F, S; 1, 1) 

Selected experiments in atomic, nuclear and solid state physics, 
electronics, and spectroscopy designed to familiarize the student 
with experimental methods. Primarily for physics majors. Others 
may be admitted with permission of the instructor. One laboratory 
period per week. This course carries a laboratory fee. 

The Department 

Ph 505-506 Experimental Physics I, II (F, S; 1, 1) 

A continuation of Ph 406 with emphasis on contemporary physics 
problems. Primarily for senior physics majors. Others may be 
admitted with permission of the instructor. One laboratory period 
per week. This course carries a laboratory fee. 

The Department 

Electives (Primarily for Majors) 

Ph 321 Introduction to Relativity and Quantum Physics (F; 4) 

A study of the structure of matter according to quantum princi- 
ples: thermal radiation and Planck's postulate; photon properties; 
relativity; wave-particle duality; the Bohr atom; introduction to 
wave mechanics; simple solutions to the Schrodinger equation. 

John H. Kinnier, S.J. 

Ph 322 Introduction to Thermal and Statistical Physics (S; 4) 

A study of the structure of matter according to classical and quan- 
tum principles: basic probability concepts; the application of sta- 
tistical ideas to systems of particles in equilibrium; the interrelation 
of atomic concepts and general macroscopic thermodynamics; 
methods of statistical mechanics and applications to simple sys- 
tems. John H. Kinnier, S.J. 

Ph 327 Applied Physics (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ph 209-210 or Ph 211-212 and Mt 100-101 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

The physical principles of the application of solid materials to 
electronic, optical, and electro-optical devices. Topics will in- 
clude preparation and structure of semiconductor crystals; and 
the basic physics of the electrical properties of solid state devices 
including junctions, diodes, transistors, photoconductors, and 
lasers. George Goldsmith 

Ph 332 Optics (F; 3) 

A treatment of geometrical, physical, and modern optics, with 
emphasis on the latter areas including applications. Optical sys- 
tems, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, interference, polariza- 
tion, Fourier transform spectroscopy, holographs, and lasers. 

Robert L. Becker 

Ph 399 Scholar's Project (F; S) 

Reserved for physics majors selected as Scholars of the College. 
Content, requirements, and credits by arrangement with the ap- 
proval of the chairperson. The Department 

Ph 401 Mechanics (F; 4) 

Classical mechanics at the intermediate level. Particle dynamics 
and oscillations in one dimension. Conservative forces. Conser- 



Arts and Sciences / 71 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 



vation principles: energy, momentum, angular momentum. Par- 
ticle dynamics, orbit theory, and stability for central forces; the 
Kepler problem; Rutherford scattering. Accelerating frames of ref- 
erence. Rigid body dynamics. Introduction to Lagrange's equa- 
tions. Dennis P. Pacheco 

Ph 402 Electricity and Magnetism (S; 4) 

Electricity and magnetism at the intermediate level. Electrostat- 
ics; Laplace's equation. Magnetostatics. Maxwell's equations; 
electromagnetic waves. Electron theory; dispersion; theory of the 
dielectric constant. Electromagnetic radiation. Joseph H. Chen 

Ph 411 Atomic and Molecular Physics (F; 4) 

A course at the intermediate level: Simple and multi-electron 
atoms; Schrodinger equation; Pauli principle; atomic spectra, 
Zeeman and Stark effects; selection rules; X-rays; molecular phys- 
ics. Baldassare Di Bartolo 

Ph 412 Nuclei and Particles (S; 4) 

A course at the intermediate level: Structure of the nucleus. The 
neutron; the deuteron. Alpha decay; beta decay. Nuclear models. 
Nuclear reactions; collision theory. Nuclear forces. High energy 
physics; systematics and properties of elementary particles; sym- 
metries. Gabor Kalman 

Ph 421 Molecular Structure and Spectra 

This course will present a treatment of the electronic, vibrational 
and rotational spectra of molecules and will relate these spectra 
to the symmetry and structure of these systems. This treatment 
will include both absorption and emission of radiation, selection 
rules, and Raman scattering. Elements of chemical kinetics of 
simple molecules will also be presented. 

Ph 425 Introduction to Solid State Physics (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 100-101; one year of physics. 
A survey of solid state physics, including: crystal structure; phon- 
ons and lattice vibrations; band theory; thermal, optical, electrical 
and magnetic properties of solids and superconductivity. Phys- 
ical characterization of materials. Open to all science majors. 

Joseph H. Chen 

Ph 432 High Energy Physics 

A course that surveys the historical and conceptual development 
of ideas about the subnuclear realm. Topics include kinematics 
of high-energy reactions, particle properties and schemes of sys- 
tematizing particles, invariance principles and symmetries, se- 
lection rules, interaction types, especially the weak and strong. 
Special relativity will be developed as needed. 

Ph 437 Electric and Electronic Circuit Analysis 

Prerequisites: Mt 201, Ph 210 or 212 

This course deals with the responses of electric circuits contain- 
ing resistance, capacitance, and inductance to periodic and non- 
periodic inputs, and an introduction to electronic devices and 
circuitry. Techniques and concepts include nodal, mesh, and 
loop analyses; impedance and admittance; transfer functions; 
complex frequency response analyses, Fourier and Laplace Trans- 
form techniques; transistors; operational amplifiers; and digital 
circuits. Forms a solid foundation for subsequent study of digital 
electronics, control systems, and communication systems. 

Ph 440 Applied Fluid Mechanics (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mt 201 

Fundamental topics of incompressible fluid flow include appli- 
cation of the continuity, momentum and energy equations for 
inviscid flow; linear and angular momentum theorems; vorticity, 
irrotational flows, and stream functions; hydrostatics, buoyancy, 
and density effects; drag, lift, and Bernoulli's equation; dimen- 
sional analysis and dynamic similarity; Navier-Stokes equations 
for viscous flow; and boundary layer phenomena. The concepts 
of turbulent flow are briefly introduced including Reynolds 
stresses, turbulent diffusion of heat and momentum, and turbu- 
lent dissipation. Applications from oceanography, environmental 
and biomedical engineering are introduced throughout. 



Ph 480 Introduction to Mathematical Physics (S; 3) 

Determinants, matrices and their application to the solution of 
linear differential equations. Other areas to be studied are: Fourier 
series, Laplace and Fourier transforms. Solomon L. SchwebeJ 

Ph 525 Plasma Physics (F; 3) 

Introduction to the problems, methods and concepts of plasma 
physics. Applications to controlled fusion research and space and 
astrophysical situations. Particle motions, fluid and kinetic 
models. Equilibrium and stability of plasma configurations. 
Plasma waves. Radiation from plasmas. Pradip Bakshi 

Ph 535-536 Projects in Experimental Physics I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson. 

Individual research problems in atomic, nuclear, and solid state 
physics. Advanced studies in the application of contemporary 
techniques to experimental physics. Project approval must be 
obtained prior to the beginning of the semester, normally at the 
time of pre-registration. One lecture and two laboratory periods 
per week. Lab fee: $50.00. The Department 

Ph 599 Readings and Research in Physics (F; S) 

Individual programs of study and research for advanced physics 
majors under the direction of a physics faculty member. Credits 
and requirements by arrangement with the approval of the 
chairperson. The Department 

Ph 610 Coherent Optics and Lasers 

A course at the advanced undergraduate and graduate level; Huy- 
gen's principle, Fourier transforms, array theorem, image for- 
mation and impulse response, resolution, the transfer function, 
diffraction and interference with partially coherent light, image 
formation with coherent light, coherent optical data processing, 
holography, various types of lasers and their applications. 

Ph 615 Astrophysics and Cosmology 

The overall structure of the Universe: galaxies, clusters, stars. 
Outlines of general relativity. Principles of stellar evolution. Hy- 
drostatic equilibrium, radiative transfer, nuclear processes. Late 
phases of stellar evolution: White dwarfs and neutron stars. Black 
holes. Pulsars. Galactic structure. Quasars. Cosmological theories 
and their tests. 

Graduate Electives with Approval 

Ph 711 Classical Mechanics (F; 4) 

Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations; principle of Least Action; 
invariance principles; rigid body motion; canonical transforma- 
tions; Hamilton-Jacobi theory; special theory of relativity; small 
oscillations; continuous media. Rein A. Uritam 

Ph 732 Electromagnetic Theory I (S; 4} 

Physical basis for Maxwell's equations; electrostatics and mag- 
netostatics; multipole moments; energy and momentum conser- 
vation for the electromagnetic field; wave phenomena; point 
charge motion in external fields. Baldassare Di Bartolo 

Ph 741 Quantum Mechanics I (F; 4) 

Fundamental concepts; bound states and scattering theory; the 
Coulomb field; perturbation theory; angular momentum and spin; 
symmetry and the Pauli principle. Pradip Bakshi 

Ph 835-836 Mathematical Physics I, II (F, S; 2, 2) 

Matrix algebra, linear vector spaces, orthogonal functions and 
expansions, boundary value problems, introduction to Green's 
functions. 



Political Science 



Faculty 

O'Neill Chair Professor Samuel H. Beer, B.A., University of Mich- 
igan; B.A., Balliol College, Oxford; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor Robert K. Faulkner, A.B., Dartmouth College; A.B., Ox- 
ford University; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 



72 / Arts and Sciences 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Professor David Lowenthal, A.B., Brooklyn College; B.S., New 
York University; A.M., Ph.D., New School for Social Research 

Professor Marvin C. Rintala. A.B., University of Chicago; A.M., 
Ph.D., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy 

Professor Robert Scigliano, A.B., A.M., University of California at 
Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Professor Peter S.H. Tang, A.B., National Chengchih University; 
A.M., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Associate Professor Gary P. Brazier, B.S., Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Associate Professor Christopher J. Bruell, A.B., Cornell University; 
A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Associate Professor Donald S. Carlisle, A.B., Brown University; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Robert K. Faulkner, A.B., Dartmouth College; 
A.B., Oxford University; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Associate Professor Donald L. Hafner, A.B., Kalamazoo College; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Associate Professor Marc K. Landy, A.B., Oberlin College; Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

Associate Professor David R. Manwaring, Chairman of the 
Department 

A.B., A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Wiscon- 
sin 

Associate Professor Kay L. Schlozman, A.B., Wellesley College; 
A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Assistant Professor David A. Deese, B.A., Dartmouth College; M.A., 
Felcher School of Law and Diplomacy; M.A.L.D., Ph.D., Tufts 
University 

Assistant Professor Dennis Hale, A.B., Oberlin College; Ph.D., City 
University 

Assistant Professor Susan M. Shell, B.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

Instructor Rolf G. Wichmann, B.A., M.A., University of California 
at Berkeley 



Program Description 

Students majoring in Political Science are prepared for political 
and administrative careers, foreign service, law, journalism, grad- 
uate work, and teaching in the social sciences. 

Requirements: All students in the department are required to 
take Fundamental Concepts of Political Science as the first course. 
A minimum of 8 courses should be taken in Political Science 
electives distributed among each of the following areas: American 
Government, Comparative Government, Political Theory and In- 
ternational Politics. 



Course Offerings 

Core Courses: Introductory 

Students may take only one of these sequences. 

Po 025 Politics and Government in America (F; 3) 

This course will serve as an introduction to American national 
political structures and processes. Topics covered include polit- 
ical parties, pressure groups, Congress, the Presidency, the bu- 
reaucracy and the Supreme Court. Attention will be given to 
contemporary political developments as they illustrate typical 
patterns of American politics. Note: Not open to students who 
have taken Po 061. Counts toward core requirement. 

Marie NatoJi 

Po 041-042 Fundamental Concepts of Political Science 

(F, S; 3, 3) 

Introduction to the study of government systems, basic political 



concepts and political science as a scholarly discipline. For ma- 
jors only. Counts toward core requirement. David Deese 

Dennis Hale 

Marvin Rintala 

John Tierney 

Rolf Wichmann 

Po 061 Perspectives on American Democracy: The Organization of 
Power (F; 3) 

Po 061 and 062 are designed as a year-long sequence providing 
a complete and integrated introduction to the workings of Amer- 
ican politics; however, either semester course may be taken sep- 
arately if desired. Po 061 analyzes the American political system 
with particular attention to how constitutional structure and pro- 
cedure operate to allocate power and influence among competing 
interests in society. Stress is on those aspects of the system that 
make it work the way it does, and on the moral pro's and con's 
of both process and results. Counts toward core 
requirement. David R. Manwaring 

Po 062 Perspectives on American Democracy: Major Issues of 
Public Policy (S; 3) 

Public policies in selected areas (including monopoly control, 
labor-management relations, protection and promotion of civil 
rights, land and water management, social welfare, delivery of 
health and education services) will be surveyed. Examination of 
cultural, social and political factors will attempt to demonstrate 
how public policies are defined, resolved and administered, and 
by whom. For non-majors. Counts toward core 
requirement. Gary P. Brazier 

Po 071 Political Classics (F; 3) 

A one-semester introduction to the study of political matters 
through the careful analysis and discussion of several outstanding 
writings, ancient and modern. Special emphasis is given to the 
problem of determining the nature, aim and forms of political 
community. Readings will be drawn from Plato, Shakespeare, 
Machiavelli, Bacon, Locke, Lincoln, Marx, Churchill, Orwell. The 
class will divide into small discussion sections on Fridays. 
Counts toward core requirement. Non-majors only. 

David LowenthaJ 

Special Undergraduate Courses 

Po 281 or 282 Individual Research in Political Science (F, S; 3) 

One semester of research under the supervision of a member of 
the department and culminating in a long paper or some equiv- 
alent. The permission of teacher desired must be solicited. 

The Department 

Po 291-292 Senior Honors Program in Political Science 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

A year of individual research, culminating in a thesis. For selected 
seniors. Time to be arranged jointly by each student and his or 
her advisor. The Department 



Undergraduate Electives 

Undergraduate seminars, listed at the end of each of the four 
fields, meet once a week and are limited to twenty students, 
primarily juniors and seniors. 

American Politics 

Po 302 American National Government (S; 3) 

This is a survey of American national government and politics. 
Among the topics treated are: the constitutional founding, Con- 
gress, the Presidency, the Supreme Court, political parties and 
elections, and civil liberties and equality. An intensive core 
course; not open to freshmen. Robert Scigliano 

Po 303 The Modern Presidency (F; 3) 

An investigation of the development of the Presidency in the 
Twentieth Century. Special attention will be given to the manner 
in which the activist presidents from Teddy Roosevelt to Jimmy 
Carter have attempted to reconcile the role of domestic steward 



Arts and Sciences / 73 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 



with that of world leader. Note: Not open to students who have 

taken Po 304. 

Not offered 1982-83 Marc Landy 

Po 305 State and Local Government (F; 3) 

Analysis of state constitutions, legislative, executive, and judicial 
organization and procedures; political parties, political interest 
groups and elections; state-local government relations; personnel, 
finance, and major functions. Gary P. Brazier 

Po 306 American Parties and Elections (S; 3) 

A general survey of American political parties and elections. In- 
vestigation of such topics as minor parties, the life and death of 
party machines, the role of the media in political campaigns, the 
importance of money in politics, and changing political com- 
mitments and alignments will entail consideration of the issues, 
personalities and campaign tactics involved in recent elections. 
Emphasis will be placed on the role of parties in structuring 
political conflict and the role of elections in enhancing citizen 
control of political leaders. The Department 

Po 308 Public Administration (S; 3) 

This is a general survey of the theory and practice of adminis- 
tration in the public sector. Among the topics treated are: theories 
of organization and administration, leadership, communication, 
budgeting, administrative law, personnel practices, and public 
unionism. Special emphasis will be placed upon encouraging the 
student to develop an understanding of the problems and poten- 
tial of administration in public organizations. 
Not offered 1982-83 Dennis Hale 

Po 309 The Legislative Process (F; 3) 

This course examines the policy making process in American 
legislatures. It focuses primarily on the U.S. Congress. The course 
attempts to assess the impact of the following factors on the leg- 
islative process: committee structure, interest groups, individual 
personality, established procedure, legislative elections, legisla- 
tive staff, the Executive, and party leadership. John Tierney 

Po 310 Politics and the Administration of Justice (S; 3) 

Intensive treatment of legal, political and moral issues in the 
American system of criminal justice, with particular emphasis 
on the constitutional rights of criminal defendants and various 
factors (congestion, plea-bargaining, etc.) which affect the via- 
bility of those rights. A discussion section will be run for graduate 
students, given sufficient demand. 
Not offered 1982-83 David R. Manwaring 

Po 311 Urban Politics (F; 3) 

This is a general survey of the political institutions, decision- 
making processes, and public policies of urban areas. Among the 
topics treated are: the economic and political development of the 
urban community; the nature of political cleavage and conflict 
in urban areas; the institutions and decision-making processes of 
urban governments; the public policies of the cities; and an as- 
sessment of political alternatives for the governing of urban 
areas. Dennis Hale 

Po 313 Political Life in American Democracy (F; 3) 

Not offered 1982-83 Kay Schlozman 

Po 316 Topics in American Politics: The President, Congress and 
the War Power (S; 3) 

A study of the role of the President and Congress in foreign policy, 
particularly with respect to the use of military force. The course 
considers the intention of the Founding Fathers and political 
practice from the late eighteenth century to the present. 
Not offered 1982-83 Robert Scigliano 

Po 317 American Presidency (F; 3) 

An examination of the American Presidency in the views and 
actions of major Presidents; in electoral politics; and in relations 
with Congress, the courts, and the executive bureaucracy. Special 
attention will be given to an analysis of styles of Presidential 
leadership. Note: Not open to students who have taken Po 
303. Robert Scigliano 

Po 319 National Security Policy (F; 3) 

An analysis of basic security policy issues facing the United States 
in a nuclear world, with specific reference to such contemporary 



matters as current nuclear strategic policy, arms limitation, 
American military commitments abroad, and the relationship of 
the military to a democratic society. (Fulfills departmental dis- 
tributional requirement in either American or International Poli- 
tics.) Donald L. Ha/ner 

Po 320 Debates on Civil Liberties (S; 3) 

Instructors will debate policy alternatives in the area of church- 
state relations, freedom of speech and press and defendant's 
rights. Historical, legal and philosophical materials are used to 
explicate these issues. Particular attention is paid to problems 
raised by school prayers, aid to church schools, obscenity, rev- 
olutionary political groups, and police interrogation and sur- 
veillance. A discussion section will be run for graduate students. 
Intensive core course; not open to freshmen. David Lowenthal 

David R. Manwaring 

Po 321 American Constitutional Law (F; 3) 

The evolution of the American Constitution through Supreme 
Court decisions is studied, with emphasis on the nature and limits 
of judicial power, and the Court's special role as protector of 
individual rights. David R. Manwaring 

Po 324 Federal Administration (S; 3) 

This course will be devoted to an examination of the politics of 
public organization and administration at the level of American 
national government. Special consideration will be given to the 
political relationships involving the President, federal agencies, 
Congress, and private interest groups. An underlying theme of 
the course will be an assessment of the political problems in- 
herent in policy implementation, policy change, and accounta- 
bility in the federal bureaucracy. Dennis Hale 

Po 325 Intergovernmental Relations (F; 3) 

An analytical survey of theories, institutions, and forces that 
shape the distribution and utilization of governmental power 
within the United States federal system. Particular attention given 
national-state-local relations and the emerging problems of area 
and administration. 
Offered 1983-84 Gary P. Brazier 

Po 327 Politics and Policies in Metropolitan Areas (F; 3) 

An investigation of the politics and administration and charac- 
teristic problems of metropolitan areas. Special consideration 
given to the impact of shifting populations on such public policies 
as land use, housing, welfare, education, and law enforcement. 
Not offered 1982-83 Gary P. Brazier 

Po 328 Women in Politics (S; 3) 

In this course various aspects of women's experiences in political, 
economic and social life will be examined in order to understand 
how citizens who share common experiences and interests gain 
awareness of those interests and become a politically relevant 
force. Attention will be paid to the woman's movement both as 
it emerged during the 19th century and as it is developing today. 
Not offered 1982-83 Kay Schlozman 

Po 329 American Political Ideas and Institutions (F; 3) 

The course has two themes: basic ideas underlying American 
political institutions, and defenses and critiques of those insti- 
tutions. The first theme is examined in some of the writings of 
Jefferson and Lincoln, and the second theme is examined, more 
extensively, in The Federalist and works by Walter Bagehot, 
Woodrow Wilson, Charles Beard, and a contemporary author. 
Not offered 1982-83 Robert Scigliano 



Po 330 The Politics of Health and Welfare (S; 3) 



Not offered 1982-83 



The Department 



Po 332 The "Great Rights": The First Amendment and American 
Democracy (S; 3) 

Intensive consideration of two distinctly American contributions 
to modern politics: the free and open forum of discussion implicit 
in the guarantees of freedom of speech and press; and the secular 
state arising out of the establishment and free-exercise clauses. 
While primary emphasis is on the evolution of the constitutional 
principles through Supreme Court decisions, attention will also 



74 / Arts and Sciences 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 



be devoted to political and social impact of these principles and 
recent political controversies which they have fostered. 

David R. Manwaring 

Po 334 The Politics of Energy and the Environment (S; 3) 

This course assesses the impact of politics upon environmental 
control and energy development. Among the specific policy areas 
which it examines are: air and water pollution, hazardous waste 
disposal, land use, coal, oil, electricity production and nuclear 
energy. Marc Landy 

Po 336 Pressure Groups: Private Power and the Public 
Interest (S; 3) 

This course will examine the nature of private interest groups 
and their role in the formation of public policy. Special attention 
will be paid to the degree to which the public interest is served — 
or is not served — by the process of competition between such 
groups. Extensive use will be made of case studies such as the 
politics of medicare, pollution, and corporate regulation. 

The Department 

Po 338 Judicial Process (S; 3) 

A study of the American judicial process from the initiation of 
cases to their final determination. Special attention will be given 
to the tensions between the judiciary and the other branches of 
government and, consequently, to the question of the proper place 
of judges in a democratic political system. Robert Scigliano 

Po 339 Public Policy (F; 3) 

A systematic study of the determinants, content and outcomes 
of public policy making in the United States and of the methods 
which have been developed for analyzing policy formation in 
specific public program areas. Special attention will be paid to 
evolutionary trends in policy making and their likely effects upon 
the future scope and substance of governmental activity. 

Marc Landy 

Po 343 Politics and Inequality (F; 3) 

This course will consider the nature of political and social in- 
equality and its relation to politics. Various bases of inequality — 
race, sex, class, age, caste — will be discussed. The course will 
also examine political demands for equality and the ways in 
which modern governments intervene in society to promote 
equality. Although illustrative materials will be drawn mainly 
from American politics, other nations — traditional and modern — 
will be discussed as well. 
Not offered 1982-83 Kay L. Schlozman 

Po 345 Political Socialization (F; 3) 

The learning of political behavior. The course will cover ways in 
which people learn political orientations and values; the agents 
of socialization (e.g., family, the media, events, school structures); 
and the effects of this learning process on the political 
system. Marie Natoli 

Po 347 Representation/Citizenship (F; 3) 

These two topics of American politics will be the subjects of 
intensive examination, with about half the term being given to 
each. In the study of representation we will be interested in elec- 
tive democracy and participatory (direct) democracy and in non- 
elective forms of representation such as bureaucratic and judicial 
representation. The study of citizenship will be concerned with 
the meaning of citizenship, how citizenship is gained and lost 
and the differences between citizens and aliens. 

Robert Scigliano 

Po 352 Urban Politics Seminar (S; 3) 

Seminar in Political Biography. This seminar will study urban 
politics by studying the lives of city politicians, as recorded in 
biographies and autobiographies. Primarily these will be studies 
of mayors, but some lesser office-holders (aldermen, ward leaders, 
etc.) and some higher office-holders (governors) will be included 
for comparison. The study of political biography will provide an 
opportunity to study the motives, personalities, and careers of 
politicians at the level of local government; the cities themselves; 
and the institutional and political framework of city government. 
Subjects will include the following: James M. Curley of Boston; 
Al Smith, Fiorello LaGuardia, Robert Wagner, John Lindsay, Wil- 
liam Tweed, and Carmine DiSapio, all of New York City; Ed 



Crump of Memphis; Tom Pendergast of Kansas City; Cermak and 
Daley of Chicago; Huey Long of Louisiana; Richard Lee of New 
Haven; and Kevin White of Boston. 
Not offered 1982-83 Dennis Hale 

Po 354 Public Administration Seminar (S; 3) 

This will be an advanced undergraduate seminar for those stu- 
dents wishing to pursue the subject of public administration be- 
yond the introductory level. Among the topics to be considered 
are the following: the theory of administration; public adminis- 
tration as a government function and as a scholarly discipline; 
the nature of modern bureaucracy; the expanding apparatus of 
the central state; public budgets; recruiting and managing per- 
sonnel in public agencies; and the distinctions among federal, 
state, and city administration. Readings will draw on case studies, 
scholarly journals, and the most recent books in the field. Pre- 
requisite: Po 308, Po 324, or permission of instructor. 

Dennis Hale 

Po 355-356 Internship Seminar: Policy and Administration in 
State and Local Government (F, S; 6, 6) 

A program of study based upon work experience in legislative, 
executive, and administrative offices in Greater Boston. The for- 
mulation of policy, the nature of responsibility, and the role of 
bureaucracy in state and local communities will be examined 
with the help of public officials of those communities. 
Juniors and seniors selected on the basis of fitness for assignment 
to public offices. Gary P. Brazier 

Po 358 Comparative State Legislatures (S; 3) 

This course examines the current effort to move beyond case 
studies of individual state legislatures to a broader and more 
theoretical comparative approach. Topics will include: charac- 
teristics of individual legislators, committee systems, the "pro- 
fessionalization" of state legislatures, state legislative elections, 
the impact of legislative procedures on policy outcomes, and the 
attempt to assess the performance of state legislatures. 
Not offered 1982-83 The Department 

Po 364 The New Deal: A Transformation of American Politics and 
Public Policy (S; 3) 

An examination of the New Deal in terms of American political 
development. It includes an intensive examination of the specific 
political and policy developments and debates of the period and 
of the role of FDR's political leadership in shaping those develop- 
ments. Marc Landy 

Po 366 Political Economy and Public Policy (S; 3) 

This seminar examines the contribution of a selected group of 
contemporary economists to debates about the purposes of public 
policy and the appropriate means for achieving those purposes. 
Specific topics to be analyzed include: economic growth; regu- 
lation of business; planning; inflation; income redistribution and 
the public use of private incentives. 
Not offered 1982-83 Marc Landy 

Po 367 Topics in Intergovernmental Relations (F; 3) 

Our subject will be the politics of intergovernmental relations in 
the contemporary welfare state, specifically the interaction of 
subnational governments and national governments in making 
policies, framing programs and delivering services. We will look 
at the relations of the Federal level with the state-local level and 
at parallel developments within the states. Main focus will be on 
the experience of Massachusetts. Comparisons will be made with 
other federal systems (e.g., Canada) and unitary systems (e.g., 
Great Britain). Samuel H. Beer 

Po 371-372 Women in Political and Governmental Careers 
(F, S; 3, 6 undergraduate; 3, 3 graduate) 

A year-long program designed to encourage and educate women 
in the intricacies and realities of the political world and to de- 
velop the skills necessary to seek appointive or elective office 
and employment in local, state or national government. Entry 
into this special program is by permission of the 
instructor. Betty Taymor 

Comparative Politics 

Po 405-406 Politics in Western Europe (F, S; 3, 3) 

A comparative analysis of political thought, action, and organi- 



Arts and Sciences / 75 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 



zation in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Sweden, and 
Switzerland. Serves as an introduction to the study of compar- 
ative politics. Intensive core course; not open to 
freshmen. Marvin Rintala 

Po 407 The Government and Politics of East Central Europe 
(F;3) 

This course analyzes the political development as well as do- 
mestic and foreign policies of eight Communist-controlled coun- 
tries of East Central Europe, namely, Albania, Bulgaria, 
Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and 
Yugoslavia. Emphasis is placed on their Communist seizure of 
power, processes of Sovietization, as well as their relations among 
the Communist bloc countries and with non-communist coun- 
tries. Special attention is paid to the character of the Party and 
state, quality and standing of the leadership, as well as formu- 
lation and evolution of the political, military, economic, social 
and cultural policies. 
Not offered 1982-83 Peter S.H. Tang 

Po 409 The Soviet Political System (F; 3) 

This course traces the Soviet state through its phases under Lenin, 
Stalin, Khrushchev and Brezhnev. The contemporary Soviet po- 
litical system will be analyzed, with special emphasis on the role 
of the Communist Party and the problem of totalitarianism. Con- 
siderable attention will be devoted to the problems of social class, 
nationality, and dissent in a modern industrial polity. 

Donald S. Carlisle 

Po 410 Government and Politics of China (S; 3) 

A survey of the ideological framework, historical development, 
organizational structure and operational techniques of contem- 
porary Chinese political institutions. An analysis of the com- 
munist ideology, policies and instruments of power, including 
the Party, state, economic, social, military, and propaganda ma- 
chines and such drives as the struggle against revisionism and 
the cultural revolution. Peter S. H. Tang 

Po 412 Comparative Urban Politics (S; 3) 

A comparison of selected American and non- American cities with 
respect to their traditions, politics and problems. 

Gary P. Brazier 

Po 413 Development and Modernization in the Third World 
(F;3) 

Comparative analysis of development strategies in less developed 
countries. Theories of development and modernization will be 
discussed as well as development policy in mainly contemporary 
and some historical experience. Special attention will be paid to 
agrarian transformation and land reform, industrialization, trade, 
and capital and technology transfer. The course will also focus 
on the role of institutions in development and modernization 
processes and will analyze the nature of the traditional peasant 
economy. v Rolf Wichmann 

Po 414 Power and Policy: The USA and the USSR (S; 3) 

An analysis of the parallel, divergent, and interacting develop- 
ment patterns of the Soviet Union and the United States since 
1929. Both domestic and foreign policy will be examined. The 
triangular relationship of the U.S.S.R., the U.S.A., and China will 
also be explored. Political leadership, policy problems, and eth- 
nic-national issues in both the Soviet and American systems will 
be given special attention. 
Not offered 1982-83 Donald S. Carlisle 

Po 422 Crisis Politics: Violence, Revolution and War (S; 3) 

This course explores theories (philosophical, anthropological and 
biological) regarding the roots of violence, revolution and war. 
We will then analyze selected historical episodes, including 
French, Russian and Chinese Revolutions, the Nazi experience 
and "total war" in the twentieth century. Attention will also be 
given to the Vietnam episode and to events in America. Intensive 
core course; not open to freshmen. Donald S. Carlisle 

Po 426 Revolution and Social Change in the Islamic Middle 
East (S; 3) 

This course will offer an introduction to the politics of the Middle 
East in the 20th Century as well as a description and analysis of 



the social and political forces that are transforming it. Subjects 
to be covered will include Islam and traditional Islamic political 
and social institutions, the impact of the West and colonialism, 
nationalism, radicalism, and the revival of militant fundamen- 
talist Islam as a political force in the region. Rolf Wichmann 

Po 428 State and Development in Latin America (S; 3) 

This course will discuss the role of the state in the economic 
development and social transformation of Latin America. Devel- 
opment policies as well as the social and political forces influ- 
encing their formulation will be analyzed. Of particular interest 
will be the comparative analysis of populist, socialist and mili- 
tary-technocratic states and their respective development poli- 
cies. After a general overview, the course will focus on Brazil, 
Chile, Peru, Cuba, Nicaragua and Mexico. 
Not offered 1982-83 Rolf Wichmann 

Po 434 Comparing National Strategies: Foreign Economic Security 
Policies (S; 3) 

Lecture, with discussions; compares the processes and patterns 
of foreign policy in three developed and developing nations; fo- 
cuses on foreign economic and security issues, including energy 
and its relationship to national security. David Deese 

Po 451 Topics in Latin American Politics (F; 3) 

Seminar on Latin American politics. Topic will vary from year 
to year. Themes will include comparative studies of development 
policies, regime types and other aspects of political, economic 
and social change. Some emphasis will be placed on historical 
patterns of Latin American political and economic development. 

Rolf Wichmann 

Po 453 Politics and Social Change in the Contemporary Middle 
East (F; 3) 

This seminar will focus on a number of topics of special relevance 
to the study of the region. Topics will include Arab nationalism 
and socialism, traditional Islamic political and social institutions, 
contemporary Islamic radicalism, the relationship between oil 
revenues and national development, regional rivalries and con- 
flicts, and the influence of great powers in the area. 
Not offered 1982-83 Rolf Wichmann 

Po 461 Power and Personality (F; 3) 

This seminar examines both the significance of personality in 
seeking, exercising, and losing power and the significance of seek- 
ing, exercising, and losing power for personality. Class discussion 
will focus first on certain analytical, including psychoanalytical, 
hypotheses about the relationship between power and person- 
ality, then on applying and testing these hypotheses in psycho- 
biographies of particular powerful persons such as Woodrow 
Wilson, Winston Churchill, and Adolf Hitler, and finally on stu- 
dent research projects. 
Not offered 1982-83 Marvin Rintala 

Po 462 Parties and Party Systems (S; 3) 

This seminar tries to define the concepts of party and of party 
system and to distinguish different types of parties and of party 
systems in selected modern political systems, especially in West- 
ern Europe. Class discussion will focus first on common readings 
and then on individual research projects. Marvin Rintala 

International Politics 

Po 501 International Politics (F; 3) 

The nation-state system, its principles of operation and the bases 
of national power and policy are examined. This course serves 
as an introduction to the study of international politics. 

Donald L. Hafner 

Po 504 International Politics of Europe: World War II to 
the Present (S; 3) 

A study of the main currents of international relations among 
European nations in recent decades, focusing particularly on the 
forces which brought about Europe's division into East and West 
and contemporary developments which now may be easing that 
division. Donald L. Hafner 

Po 505 American Foreign Policy (F; 3) 

An examination of major patterns of United States foreign policy 
with special emphasis on the twentieth century. Contemporary 



76 / Arts and Sciences 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 



problems of foreign policy, e.g. SALT, The Middle East and Indo- 
china, will be treated in the context of international relations 
with special reference to area and subject factors, and milestones 
of American foreign policy and the U.S. decision-making process, 
as illustrated by case studies. The effect of current events are 
dealt with in regular discussion and related to the subject matter 
of the course. The Department 

Po 506 Soviet Foreign Policy (S; 3) 

In this course Soviet international behavior will be treated in 
terms of three sectors: (1) policy toward the West, (2) policy re- 
garding non-Communist underdeveloped countries; (3) policy 
toward other Communist states and non-ruling Communist par- 
ties. Topics such as the Comintern, "Socialism in One Country," 
the Soviet Bloc, the Cold War, Peaceful Coexistence, and Poly- 
centrism, as well as other contemporary international problems 
will be considered. Donald S. Carlisle 

Po 508 International Communist Movement (S; 3) 

A survey of the theory and practice of the world communist 
movement as advocated and promoted by Marx, Engels, Lenin, 
Stalin, Mao, and Castro. An examination of the political, eco- 
nomic, social, and cultural transformation of the communist 
countries, as well as the evolution and struggle of the communist 
parties. An inquiry into the prospects of the communist 
movement. Peter S.H. Tang 



Po 509 International Organization (F; 3) 

Not offered 1982-83 



Po 510 Comparative Foreign Policies (S; 3) 

An examination of the foreign policies of major powers of the 
twentieth century, including Britain, France, the two Germanys, 
the U.S.S.R., China and Japan on problems of relevance to the 
United States, e.g. European security, peace in the Far East, and 
the development of less industrialized countries. Domestic fac- 
tors are related to foreign policy. Special reference will be made 
to the policies of the developing nations as they affect the peace 
and security of mankind. Current events are discussed in the 
context of lecture-discussions. The Department 

Po 511 Sino-Soviet Relations (F; 3) 

A study of the background and development of political, eco- 
nomic, strategic, social, and cultural relations between Russia 
and China, especially in the light of their changed regimes. Em- 
phases are given to ideological issues between the Soviet and 
Chinese Communist Parties and the impact of their current dis- 
putes on the world. 
Not offered 1982-83 Peter S.H. Tang 

Po 516 International Politics: The American Perspective (S; 3) 

This course will examine the distinctive ways in which the 
American public and policy-makers have understood and applied 
principles of international politics during our nation's history. 
The domestic political as well as the intellectual foundations of 
American international behavior will be studied. 

Donald Ha/ner 

Po 522 Politics of the Third World: Communism, Nationalism and 
Modernization (S; 3) 

A study of the interaction of nationalism and cold war politics 
in the economic and political development of countries in Asia, 
Africa and Latin America. Subjects dealt with include the rele- 
vance (as seen by both sides) of communist ideology to problems 
of nation-building and development; indigenous movements 
such as pan-Africanism and pan-Arabism; Sino-Soviet competi- 
tion for support from the national liberation movement; and the 
evolution of American, Soviet and Chinese policies toward se- 
lected countries such as India, Cuba, and the Congo, as well as 
local conflicts such as the Arab-Israeli confrontation. 
Not offered 1982-83 Peter S.H. Tang 

Po 525 The Politics of International Economic Relations (F; 3) 

Reviews the three contending classical approaches to the study 
of international political economy; liberalism, Marxism and mer- 
cantilism. Focuses on international trade, finance and investment 
(the multinational corporation) and the underlying theory of in- 
ternational regimes. Extends these regimes to the fundamental 
and more political structure imposed by East-West and North- 



South relations. Demonstrates and integrates the key theory and 

trends from the course through applied analysis of the continuing 

oil crisis and evolution in the world market.David Deese 

Po 551 International Law and Politics (F; 3) 

This seminar is designed to acquaint students with fundamentals 
of international law and politics. It consists of basic readings in 
these fields including works on International Law and Organi- 
zation. The student is prepared to acquire a comprehensive view 
of the relations between problems of politics and law in the in- 
ternational sphere. International problems relating to individual 
responsibility under international law are specially treated. Cur- 
rent events relating to this Problematik are dealt with in regular 
discussions. The Department 

Po 556 Arms, Strategy and International Control (S; 3) 

This seminar probes the theory, evolution and current issues of 
grand strategy and arms control. It includes comparative strategy; 
the role of economic determinants of strategy, and strategy in the 

Western Alliance. David Deese 

Po 562 Contemporary International Politics Analysis (S; 3) 

An examination of contemporary, theoretical perspectives and 
analytic techniques applied to the relations among nations. Some 
background in American or European foreign policy or in inter- 
national relations is recommended. 
Not offered 1982-83 Donald Ha/ner 



The Department Political Theory 



Po 601 Introduction to History of Political Philosophy (F; 3) 

An introduction to the history of political philosophy. Readings 
will include works of Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Machiavelli, 
Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Nietzsche. 
Not offered 1982-83 Susan Shell 

Po 604 Problems of Liberal Society (S; 3) 

Readings from political theorists, statesmen, Supreme Court jus- 
tices and novelists about such problems as: 1) the nature and 
limits of liberty; 2) the meaning of equality; 3) the use of force 
in international affairs; 4) the status of virtue. 
Not offered 1982-83 David Lowenthal 

Po 605 Foundations of Modern Political Philosophy (F; 3) 

An introductory consideration of a few seminal works that have 
shaped subsequent theories and, to some extent, modern civili- 
zation. Readings for 1982-83 will be drawn from works of Ma- 
chiavelli, Bacon, Hobbes, and Nietzsche. Robert K. Faulkner 

Po 608 American Political Thought (S; 3) 

A study of the fundamentals of American politics, as revealed in 
the speeches and writings of statesmen and commentators. Read- 
ings will be drawn from the works of Benjamin Franklin, Alex- 
ander Hamilton, John Calhoun, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick 
Douglass, Woodrow Wilson, F. D. Roosevelt, and selected con- 
temporary figures. A graduate section may be offered. 
Not offered 1982-83 Robert K. Faulkner 



Po 612 Political Philosophy of Plato (S; 3) 

Not offered 1982-83 



Christopher /. Bruell 



Po 614 The Behavioral Study of Politics (S; 3) 

Not offered 1982-83 Donald L. Ha/ner 

Po 616 Modern Political Theory (S; 3) 

An examination of some major works of political philosophy from 
the period of Rousseau to the present, concentrating on the emerg- 
ing critique, from both the right and the left, of modern liberal 
democracy. Readings will be drawn from the works of Rousseau, 
Kant, Comte, Marx and Nietzsche. 
Not offered 1982-83 Susan Shell 

Po 617 Introduction to the Philosophy of Law (F; 3) 

An introduction to philosophical thought about the law. The 
course will begin with consideration of the debate about the re- 
lations between law and morality and about the possibility of 
permanent standards in law and politics; several readings on 
these problems will be drawn from the works of writers influ- 
ential in contemporary thought, politics and law. The major part 
of the course will be devoted to study of these same problems as 



Arts and Sciences / 77 

PSYCHOLOGY 



they are discussed in several of the classic works of political 
philosophy. The Department 

Po 620 Fundamental Concepts of Classical Political 
Philosophy (S; 3) 

This course is meant to provide an introduction to classical po- 
litical philosophy. The theme for the semester will be justice. 
What does justice mean for the individual and the political order? 
What are the disputes which arise about it? Does classical polit- 
ical philosophy provide solutions for these? Readings will be 
mainly in Plato and Aristotle. 
Not offered 1982-83 Christopher /. BruelJ 

Po 622 Thucydides, War and Peace (S; 3) 

The course is a study of Thucydides' work on the 27-year Spartan- 
Athenian War. The aim is to discover and consider Thucydides' 
understanding of the causes of war, the prospects for peace, the 
relation to questions of war and peace of differences in govern- 
ment and national character, the varieties of political leadership 
and the responsibilities of political leaders. 

Christopher /. BruelJ 

Po 625 Democracy: Kinds, Advantages, Disadvantages (F; 3) 

A study of various sorts of popular regimes, chiefly non-American 
and non-liberal. Examples considered will include modern Swed- 
ish social democracy and the ancient democratic empire of Ath- 
ens. Some theorists of democracy will be read. 
Not offered 1982-83 Robert K. Faulkner 

Po 627 Shakespeare's Political Wisdom I (F; 3) 

Tragedy and Comedy; Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth; Midsummer 
Night's Dream, Measure for Measure, The Tempest. 

David Lowenthal 

Po 628 Shakespeare's Political Wisdom II (S; 3) 

Rome and England: CorioJanus, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleo- 
patra; King John, Henry IV, Henry V, Richard III. (May be taken 
separately from Po 627.) David Lowenthal 

Po 631 Ethics and Politics (F; 3) 

To what extent can or should moral considerations govern po- 
litical calculations? This is a perennial question, most visible just 
now in disputes between hard-hearted realists, who calculate as 
to balances of power and national interest, and concerned ideal- 
ists, devoted to human rights and peace. Readings will be drawn 
from contemporary disputes, and from writings of Machiavelli, 
Bacon, Nietzsche, Xenophon, and others. Robert K. Faulkner 



Po 633 Xenophon and Socrates (F; 3) 

Not offered 1982-83 



Christopher /. Brueli 



Po 634 Contemporary Political Theory (S; 3) 

A consideration of 20th Century political theory with special 

attention to Nietzsche and his legacy. 

Not offered 1982-83 Susan Shell 



Po 635 Plato's Republic (F; 3) 

Not offered 1982-83 



Christopher /. Brueli 



Po 654 The Political Philosophy of Hegel (S; 3) 

An examination in detail of Hegel's writings on history and pol- 
itics. 
Not offered 1982-83 The Department 

Po 656 Studies in Modern Political Theory (S; 3) 

A study of selected topics in political thought after Hegel, with 

concentration on the major critics of liberal democracy. 

Not offered 1982-83 The Department 

Po 660 The Thought of Mao Tse-Tung (S; 3) 

A seminar analyzing Mao Tse-Tung's political, economic, social, 
cultural, and military philosophy in his adaptation to and de- 
velopment of Marxism-Leninism for class struggle and world rev- 
olution, with emphasis on its theoretical formulations as well as 
its application at home and influence abroad. 
Not offered 1982-83 Peter S. H. Tang 

Po 664 Political Argument (S; 3) 

What must one keep in mind to speak and write in a politic 
fashion — and what sacrifices of truth and candor might be re- 
quired? This seminar examines such questions by considering 



two models: certain famous American speeches (by Washington, 
Jefferson, Lincoln, and F.D. Roosevelt), and a classic text, Aris- 
totle's Rhetoric. 
Not offered 1982-83 Robert K. Faulkner 

Po 666 Politics, Art and Literature: The Russian Experience 
(S;3) 

Central attention in this course is directed to the role of the in- 
tellectual, especially the writer and artist, in Russian and Soviet 
history. The interaction of culture and politics will be examined. 
The unfolding of the Russian political mind will be traced 
through Muscovy, the Tsarist and Soviet periods. Major focus in 
the course will be on the emergence and transformation of the 
Russian intelligentsia as reflected in political thought, literature, 
and the arts. 

Some of the individuals who will be dealt with are: Rublov, 
Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Gorky, Lenin, Trotsky, Zamiatin, 
Eisenstein, Pasternak, and Solzhenitsyn. (Not open to those who 
have taken Po 416.) Donald S. Carlisle 

Po 668 German Idealism (S; 3) 

An intensive study of German Idealist thought. Particular atten- 
tion will be paid to such topics as justice, freedom, and the re- 
lation between theory and practice. 
Not offered 1982-83 Susan Shell 



Psychology 



Faculty 

Professor Joseph R. Cautela, A.B., Boston College; A.M., Ph.D., 
Boston University 

Professor Marc A. Fried, Director of Psycho-Social Studies 
B.S., City College of New York; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor Murray Horwitz, B.S.S., College of the City of New York; 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Professor William Ryan, A.B., Ph.D., Boston University 

Visiting Professor Joseph J. Tecce, A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., 
Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

Professor John M. vonFelsinger, A.B., Kent State University; A.M., 
Ohio State University; Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor Daniel J. Baer, A.B., LaSalle College; A.M., 
Ph.D., Fordham University 

Associate Professor Ali Banuazizi, B.S., University of Michigan; 
A.M., The New School for Social Research; Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor Norman H. Berkowitz, A.B., University of Mas- 
sachusetts at Amherst; A.M., Ph.D., Boston University 

Associate Professor Donnah Canavan-Gumpert, A.B., Emmanuel 
College; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Associate Professor Randolph Easton, Chairman of the Department 
B.S., University of Washington; A.M., Ph.D., University of New 
Hampshire 

Associate Professor Peter Gray, A.B., Columbia University; Ph.D., 
Rockefeller University 

Associate Professor Marianne LaFrance, A.B., University of Wind- 
sor; A.M., Ph.D., Boston University 

Associate Professor G. Ramsay Liem, A.B., Haverford College; 
Ph.D., University of Rochester 

Associate Professor Michael Numan, B.S., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 

Associate Professor Michael Saks, B.S., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity; A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Assistant Professor John D. Golenski, S.J., A.B., Boston College; 
Ed.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor Michael Moore, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 



78 / Arts and Sciences 

PSYCHOLOGY 



Assistant Professor William M. Nasby, B.A., Brown University; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor Ellen Winner, A.B., Radcliffe College; Ph.D., 
Harvard University 



Program Description 

The undergraduate program in Psychology is designed to meet 
the needs of three classes of students: a) those who wish a sound 
cultural background in the study of behavior; b) those who wish 
to acquire a thorough undergraduate training in psychology, as 
majors, in anticipation of professional graduate study; and 
c) those who wish a basic understanding of human behavior as 
a supplement to some other major field of concentration. 

The Psychology Department urges its majors to seek Psychology 
faculty advisement prior to each University Registration period 
and Psychology faculty provide expanded office hours for this 
purpose. 

Students majoring in Psychology must meet the following re- 
quirements: 

1. Introduction to Psychology in their first year. These courses — 
Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science (Ps 073) 
and Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science (Ps 
074) — may be taken in either order. 

2. Statistics (Ps 190) in their second or third year. 

3. One of the various research practica in either their third or 
fourth year. 

4. At least one elective from the following: Learning Theories 
(Ps 144), Perception (Ps 143), Physiological Psychology (Ps 
150), Cognitive Psychology (Ps 147), Evolution of Behavior 
(Ps 270), or Sensory Psychology (Ps 140). 

5. At least one elective from the following group: Personality 
Theories (Ps 101), Social Psychology (Ps 131), Social Struc- 
ture and Behavior (Ps 121), Developmental Psychology (Ps 
136), or Abnormal Psychology (Ps 139). 

6. Two additional electives, for a minimum of eight Psychology 
courses. Courses designed primarily for nonmajors (those 
with numbers below 070) are not to be included among the 
eight counted toward a major. 

7. In addition, Psychology majors must take two departmen- 
tally approved courses in mathematics (Mt 004-005, Mt 
014-015, Mt 072-073, Mt 100-101, or any Mt course above 
Mt 100-101) and two courses with laboratories in either 
Biology (Bi 110-112, Bi 210-212, Bi 130-132), Chemistry 
(Ch 101-102, Ch 109-110) or Physics (Ph 111, 112, 183, 
184; with lab 101, 102). 

Courses with numbers below 070 are primarily for nonmajors 
to meet core requirements and do not satisfy requirements for 
majors. Each course is designed to achieve considerable breadth 
of coverage organized under a guiding theme. Nonmajors may 
take Ps 073 and Ps 074; however, these courses will not fulfill 
the core requirement for nonmajors. 

To majors who wish to focus their Psychology curriculum on 
one of the following areas, the following concentrations are avail- 
able: 

1 . Psychology/Management — 

Psychology faculty advisor: Dr. Norman Berkowitz 

2. Psychobiology — 

Psychology advisors: Drs. Peter Gray and Michael Numan 

3. Speech Science — 

Psychology advisor: Dr. Randolph Easton 

In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a five- 
year, joint Psychology/Social Work Master's degree program. Psy- 
chology faculty advisor: Dr. Michael Moore. 

Interested students may obtain basic informational material 
from the Psychology main office, McGuinn 300-301. 

Regarding the University Social Science Core Requirement: 

Non-majors may fulfill the University Social Science Core re- 
quirement with any Psychology course with a number below 070. 
These are the only Psychology courses which fulfill the non-major 
Core requirement. 



Psychology majors fulfill the University Core requirement by 
virtue of their completion of the Psychology major. 



Course Offerings 

Core Courses 

These courses satisfy the University social science core require- 
ment for non-majors. They may also be taken by majors but do 
not satisfy any of the requirements for the Psychology major. 

Ps 010 Major Themes in Psychological Thought (F, S; 3) 

Since man began to think, he has been striving to understand 
Man. This course addresses a few of the major, enduring issues 
in this quest. Topics will be selected from such issues as: 

— How does the mind affect the body? OR is there a "mind"? 

— Is man best understood as an individual creature or as a social 
being? As a species or as a specimen? 

— Is man moved mostly by what is inside (genes, instincts, 
"complexes") or what is outside (rewards, punishments, life 
events, reactions of others)? 

— What is "normal", what is "abnormal"? 

— What do we mean by "insanity"? 

Three instructors, with different backgrounds and areas of spe- 
cialization, will teach the course jointly, approaching the issues 
both historically and in relation to contemporary psychological 
theory and research. Ah Banuazizi 

Peter Gray 
Ellen Winner 

Ps 042 Psychology of the Mind (F; 3) 

An attempt to comprehend the capacities of the human person 
using the brain and its functions both as metaphor and as expla- 
nation. A major focus of the course will be neuropsychology, the 
study of neural mechanisms underlying human behavior. This 
course will offer the student a rudimentary introduction to the 
anatomy and physiology of the central nervous system, a cursory 
review of current research linking these facts with the facts of 
behavior, and some principles for judging the explanatory value 
brain-behavior correlations have for common human events and 
experiences. John D. GoJenski, S.J. 

Ps 055 Fundamentals of Humanistic Psychology (S; 3) 

An overview of the philosophical and psychological roots of hu- 
manistic psychology together with a critical examination of the 
theories and research of its chief representatives: Rollo May, 
Abraham Maslow, David Bakan, Carl Rogers, Robert Assagioli, 
etc. Margaret Gorman 

Ps 058 Inequality: Psychological and Social Consequences (F; 3) 

This course will examine contemporary forms of inequality and 
their organization within status systems. Attention will be de- 
voted to the ways in which these status systems are affected by 
economic, political, and social structures. Primary emphasis, 
however, will be on the consequences of inequality and the cor- 
responding status systems for attitudes, personality, interpersonal 
relations, community and residential behavior, family life, and 
work and leisure. American patterns of inequality will be com- 
pared with those in other countries and societies. This course 
will have lecture and discussion sections. Marc Fried 

Ps 062 The Psychobiology of Mental Disorders (S; 3) 

The abnormal behaviors characteristic of mental disorders are 
described and discussed with respect to psychological and bio- 
logical origins and treatments. Students are instructed in a relax- 
ation technique. Joseph Tecce 

Majors' Courses 

The following courses may be taken by both majors and non- 
majors who have fulfilled the appropriate prerequisite, however 
they do not satisfy the University social science core requirements 
for non-majors. 

Ps 073 Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science (F, S; 3) 

This course provides an introduction to experimental psychology 
and biopsychology. The following topics will be presented: sci- 



Arts and Sciences / 79 

PSYCHOLOGY 



entific methodology, sensation and perception, physiological 
psychology, behavioral development, learning and memory, cog- 
nitive psychology, evolution and genetics of behavior, animal 
behavior, motivation and emotion. This course does not satisfy the 
University social science core requirement for non-majors. 

Joseph Tecce 
To be announced 

Ps 074 Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science (F, S; 3) 

An introduction to Psychology as a behavioral science, both the- 
oretical and applied. Considers such topics as child development, 
personality, social psychology, abnormal behavior and mental 
health. This course does not satisfy the University social science 
core requirement for non-majors. Norman Berkowitz 

Donnah Canavan-Gumpert 
William Nasby 

Ps 101 Personality Theories (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 074 

A basic course introducing students to a variety of theoretical 
approaches to the understanding of character and personality. 

Donnah Canavan-Gumpert 
Ramsay Liem 

Ps 121 Social Structure and Behavior (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 074 

The impact of socioeconomic conditions and cultural factors on 
individual and group behavior in Western and non-Western soci- 
eties. AJi Banuazizi 

Ps 131 Social Psychology (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 074 

A review of the research literature on how people act and react 
to other people and how they think about and respond to their 
social experience. Included are such topics as social interaction 
and influence, attitudes and attributions, aggression and altruism, 
cooperation and conflict. Emphasis is placed on both theoretical 
and applied issues. Marianne LaFrance 

Ps 136 Developmental Psychology (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 073 or Ps 074 

General psychological issues as they relate to the developing 
child. Topics within the areas of personality, social, and cognitive 
development will be considered along with the theoretical and 
practical implications of studying age differences in behavior. 

Michael Moore 

Ps 139 Abnormal Psychology (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 073 or Ps 074 flecommended: Ps 101 
Beginning with divergent contemporary views of the meaning of 
"abnormal" in today's world, this course will systematically ex- 
plore the body of theory and data relevant to the understanding 
of maladaptive human process. The varieties of abnormal expe- 
rience and behavior will be discussed and an overview of current 
approaches to the resolution of the problem of psychopathology 
will be offered. Bamsay Liem 

William Nasby 
John vonFelsinger 

Ps 140 Sensory Psychology (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 073 

Visual, auditory, and haptic (touch) perception will be considered 
from a sensory or receptor-function level of analysis. The nature 
of different physical energies as well as the physiology of the 
eyes, ears, and limbs will be discussed as major topics. Lectures 
will be supplemented with demonstrations and 
experiments. Bandolph Easton 

Ps 143 Perception (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 073; flecommended: Ps 140 

The goal of this course is to account for the nature of our con- 
scious, perceptual experience of the environment. Two major 
approaches to perceptual theory — Helmholtzian constructive in- 
ference vs. Gibsonian direct detection — will be compared and 
contrasted by considering major perceptual phenomena. Discus- 
sion topics will emphasize visual perception and will include 
perceptual constancy, perceptual ambiguity, perceptual illusion, 
intersensory integration, and the distinction between perception 
and mental imagery. In addition, a developmental approach to 



understanding perception will be stressed in later stages of the 
course. Randolph Easton 

Ps 144 Learning Theories (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 073 

An analysis of contemporary learning theories as they relate to 
basic problems in learning. Some laboratory work will be in- 

volved./oseph Cautela 

Ps 147 Cognitive Psychology (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 073 

An information processing approach to perception and thought 
will be covered. It will be assumed that information from the 
environment is processed and transformed by the mind in order 
to control complex human behavior. Topics to be discussed will 
include perception contrasted with receptor stimulation, encod- 
ing processes, attention, memory, problem solving, concept for- 
mation, altered states of consciousness, and the functionally split 
brain of man. Michael Moore 

To be announced 

Ps 150 Physiological Psychology (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 073 or Bi 111-112 or Bi 211-212 
This course presents an introduction to the physiological basis 
of behavior. Basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology will be 
presented first. Using this background, the physiology of (a) sensory 
and motor processes, (b) sleep and arousal, (c) motivation and 
(d) psychopharmacology will be discussed. The course empha- 
sizes basic rather than complex behavioral processes because this 
is where our understanding of the brain mechanisms involved is 
most advanced. Peter Gray 

Ps 158 Piaget's Theory of Intelligence (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 147 or consent of the instructor 
This course examines the cognitive development of the child. 
Piaget's theory of the development of intelligence is the central 
focus of the course, but alternative, often rival theories and ap- 
proaches are considered as well. Topics treated include: the emer- 
gence of the ability to symbolize, the development of language, 
the evolution of logical thought and the cognitive effects of 
schooling. Ellen Winner 

Ps 180 Industrial Psychology (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 074 

Applications of psychology to various problems in industry such 
as human relations and management; decision making; principles 
of human performance; organizational behavior; jobs and occu- 
pations; employee selection and placement; job efficiency as- 
sessment; employee training and employee morale; safety and 
engineering psychology; psychology of the consumer, advertis- 
ing, and selling. Boleslaw Wysocki 

Ps 190 Statistics (F, S; 3) 

Course will present an introduction to those elementary statistics 
essential to the conduction of scientific research. Topics will 
include basic probability, the normal distribution, standard 
scores, estimation of hypothesis testing, t-scores, chi-square, anal- 
ysis of variance, and simple correlation and regression. 

Norman Berkowitz 
Randolph Easton 
To be announced 

Ps 209 Clinical Psychology (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 139 

The theory and practice of clinical psychology with special at- 
tention to the current practices, professionals and institutions 
comprising the mental health field. Each student will be expected 
to devote some time to volunteer work in a caretaking institution. 

John vonFelsinger 

Ps 215 History of Psychology (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 073 or 074 

Psychology has attempted to be many things — the refined art of 
healing disturbed personalities, the rigorous science of thought, 
the technology which predicts and controls behavior, even the 
theoretical framework for education. This course will follow the 
stories of each of these traditions within the psychological en- 
terprise, focusing on prominent workers in each movement, read- 
ing key theoretical statements, reviewing the important experiments 



80 / Arts and Sciences 

PSYCHOLOGY 



or clinical studies, and considering the contribution of each to 
the understanding of the human person. 

John D. Golenski, S.J. 

Ps 225 Psychology of Grief and Dying (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 074 

This course is a departure from the usual course structure of 
disinterested study. Persons who work with the grieving and the 
dying will contribute to class discussion and class participants 
will have the opportunity to visit sites and persons (hospitals, 
morgues, funeral homes; nurses, physicians, morticians, clergy, 
counselors, etc.) involved in the structure of death in our culture. 
Concurrent experiences and processing as well as readings will 
help reveal the pervasive presence of grief and the defenses 
against it as powerful blocks to loving and life. 

John D. Golenski, S.J. 

Ps 234 Advanced Developmental Psychology (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the professor. 

Recommended for juniors and seniors. An intensive analysis of 
issues in developmental psychology, including infancy, moti- 
vation, and cognition. The student will be responsible for a class 
presentation in an area of his/her choice. Michael Moore 

Ps 235 The Psychology of Social Change (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 074 and Ps 131 

This seminar will address the forms of conflict, stress, and dis- 
satisfaction that serve as psychological forces stimulating social 
change. Several different forms of social change will be consid- 
ered: gradual shifts, intensified conflicts, and revolution. The 
extent to which general principles or specific and different con- 
ditions operate to account for politico-economic, socio-cultural, 
and aesthetic-scientific change will be considered on the basis 
of case studies. The interrelationship between psychological pro- 
cesses, on the one hand, and social, demographic, and techno- 
logical forces, on the other will provide the core for models of 
the dynamics of social change. Marc A. Fried 

Ps 246 Social Psychology of the Family (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 074 or Ps 131 

A seminar on research and theory in family dynamics. Topics 
include: impact of family systems upon the individual; group and 
organizational dynamics of families; ethnic and community in- 
fluences on family functioning; family life cycles; therapeutic and 
social psychological interventions designed to diminish conflicts 
and improve the quality of family life. Murray Horwitz 

Ps 249 The Psychology of Nonverbal Communication (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 074 

An analysis of human communication with particular emphasis 
on the nonverbal modes of interchange. Course readings include 
material on facial expression, body movement and gesture, gaze 
behavior, personal space, and paralanguage. Focus is on what 
nonverbal and verbal behaviors communicate about the psy- 
chology of the individual, about the relationship between people 
and about the social rules that guide human 
interaction. Marianne LaFrance 

Ps 250 Advanced Physiological Psychology (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 150 and consent of the professor. 
Each student in this course will study topics of his or her own 
choosing in physiological psychology, and will prepare papers 
and class presentations pertaining to those topics. In addition, 
there will be an opportunity to study brain anatomy and to acquire 
familiarity with certain basic techniques in physiological psy- 
chology, for those who are interested. Peter Gray 

Ps 251 Psychology of Language (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 073 

This course examines the processes by which children acquire 
a first language. The course will focus on normal language de- 
velopment, but will also consider language disorders in child- 
hood and possible language capacities in non-human 
primates. Ellen Winner 

Ps 252 Naturalistic and Participant Observation (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 074 

An examination of how insights and knowledge about human 

behavior can be collected by means of systematically observing 



it in natural settings. Students will design and carry through an 
observational study in an area (e.g., social, developmental) or 
topic (sex differences, father-child interaction) of their 
choosing. Marianne LaFrance 

Ps 255 Environmental Psychology (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 073 or Ps 074 

The significance of the physical and social environment for the 
behavior of individuals, groups, and populations. This course 
will trace the effects of natural ecology, and the structure of the 
physical and social milieu on personal and social functioning. 
Particular attention will be devoted to contemporary urban, met- 
ropolitan conditions. Marc Fried 

Ps 256 Theory and Application in Group Dynamics (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 074 

The relationship between theory and experience is emphasized 
in this course. Aspects of group structure and process will be 
identified through structured class exercises and observations of 
groups in natural settings. Conceptualization of structure and 
process will be accomplished through lecture, readings and dis- 
cussion. Attention will be given to implications for improving 
member and group effectiveness in task accomplishment. Content 
will include comparisons of individual and group performance, 
group goals, decision making, norms, conformity, conflict, com- 
munication, cohesiveness, and leadership. Two examinations 
and an optional extra-credit paper will constitute the primary 
basis for grading. Norman Berkowitz 

Ps 260 Humanistic Psychology (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 074 or approval of the professor 
Critical reading of the relevant works of the precursors and chief 
representatives of humanistic psychology such as Freud, Jung, 
Maslow, May, Rogers, Assagioli, Bugental, etc. 

Margaret Gorman 

Ps 265 Psychological Assessment (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 074; Recommended: Ps 101 
The course will emphasize issues and techniques of personality 
and clinical assessment. Technical and methodological princi- 
ples of test construction (e.g., the evaluation of reliability and 
validity, as well as the establishment of norms and the interpre- 
tation of test scores) will receive extensive treatment. The survey 
of specific assessment procedures will range from traditional de- 
vices, including a variety of structured ("objective") and unstruc- 
tured ("projective") techniques, to less traditional, but increasingly 
popular, techniques of behavioral assessment and sampling. A 
major theme of the course will address the feasibility and value 
of devising and applying techniques of personality assessment 
derived from the experimental laboratory. William Nasby 

Ps 270 Evolution of Behavior 

Prerequisites: Ps 073 or Bi 111-112 or Bi 211-212 
This course deals with evolutionary aspects of animal and human 
behavior, emphasizing the importance of behavior for the survival 
and reproduction of individuals in their natural environments. 
Basic genetics and evolutionary biology will be presented first. 
The following topics will then be discussed: (a) behavior genetics, 
(b) the nature/nurture problem, (c) the role of behavior in the for- 
mation and maintenance of separate species, (d) imprinting, 
(e) territoriality, dominance hierarchies and aggression, (f) the 
evolution of mating systems (monogamy versus polygamy), and 
sex differences in behavior, (g) the evolution of helping behavior 
or altruism. 
Not offered 1982-83 Michael Numan 

Ps 273 Behavior Therapy with the Elderly (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Any psychology course or the consent of the instruc- 
tor 

The course will focus on increasing the quality of life of the 
elderly. A behavioral approach will be used to increase the gen- 
eral level of reinforcement and teach coping skills to deal with 
problematic behavior. Demonstrations, films, and field trips will 
be included. Joseph CauteJa 

Ps 276 Behavior Therapy with Children (F; 3) 

General principles of behavior therapy will be described and dis- 
cussed. The application of behavior therapy procedures to modify 
children's behavior in school settings and home environments 



Arts and Sciences / 81 

PSYCHOLOGY 



will be presented. The application of behavior modification to 
children's physical disorders as well as to social learning prob- 
lems will also be presented. There will be classroom demonstra- 
tions and guest lectures. Joseph Cautela 

Ps 277 Work and Unemployment: Psychological and Social Im- 
plications (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 101 or 121 or 139 or consent of instructor 
This course has two main objectives: first, our aim will be to 
examine the psychological and social implications of a major 
contemporary social concern — involuntary job loss — through a 
variety of theoretical and research contributions. Second, through 
this course of study, participants will be encouraged to consider 
how the case of unemployment can inform us about the often 
obscure connection between personal well-being and the broadest 
societal conditions. The course will be conducted as a seminar 
with substantial student participation. Ramsay Liem 

Ps 280 Behavioral Medicine (F; 3) 

The application of behavioral principles to the prevention, as- 
sessment and treatment of organic illness such as asthma, ar- 
thritis, ulcers, migraine, seizures. Demonstrations and field trips 
provided. Joseph Cautela 

Ps 290 Psychotherapy (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 101 and Ps 139 

A comparative evaluation of major psychotherapeutic methods 

emphasizing psychoanalytic and existential theory. 

John vonFelsinger 

Ps 292 Seminar in College Teaching (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Senior and Junior majors only 

Designed to provide undergraduate student with teaching expe- 
rience. Students staff discussion sections and are responsible for 
aiding psychology professors in planning demonstrations and 
grading examinations. 
By arrangement The Department 

Ps 297-298 Reading and Research (F, S; 3, 3) 

Psychology 297 and 298 offer a student the opportunity to work 
independently under the supervision of a faculty member of his/ 
her choice within the department. 
By arrangement The Department 

Research Methods Practica (F, S; 3) 
Ps 300-314 

Prerequisites: See below 

Each of the following research practicum courses satisfies the 
departmental research methods requirement. Under the super- 
vision of the faculty member, students will be expected to com- 
plete a research study or a more limited series of research 
exercises. Through such activities, students will participate in 
hypothesis development and testing, the development of a re- 
search design, the construction and/or application of measure- 
ment procedures, data analysis, and the reporting of research 
findings. Course requirements include writing a research pro- 
posal and a final research report. In addition, all students will 
either participate in or attend a Psychology Department Research 
Conference at the end of the semester. Although the practica 
courses all share these learning objectives, the substantive the- 
oretical focus of each differs to permit the student to engage in 
research in an area of high interest. Each practicum presumes 
knowledge of theories relevant to its special focus. For this reason, 
different prerequisites are specified for each. (Classes will be lim- 
ited to twenty.) 

Ps 301 Research Methods Practicum: Physiological & 
Comparative (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 150 or Ps 270 

Students will conduct experiments in the general area of animal 
behavior, with particular emphasis upon the hormonal regulation 
of drives in laboratory rodents. All of the projects will involve 
behavioral testing, and some may also involve small-animal sur- 
gery. Peter Gray 

Ps 302 Research Methods Practicum: Perception (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 143 or Ps 147 

Students will be divided into four groups. Each group will con- 



duct a complete experiment dealing with an important issue in 
perceptual psychology. Facets of the experimental process with 
which students will be involved include design, construction of 
apparatus and stimulus materials, data collection, data analysis 
and technical report writing. A range of feasible research topics 
will be discussed at the outset of the course and students will be 
allowed to rank-order their first three preferences. Formation of 
groups will occur on this basis. Randolph Easton 

Ps 303 Research Methods Practicum: Personality Theories (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 101 

A course in research methods stressing the application of these 
methods to questions in the area of personality psychology. Traits 
or personality variables like self-esteem are common topics. Stu- 
dents, in small groups, actually design, conduct, and report their 
research. Donnah Canavan-Gumpert 

Ps 305 Research Methods Practicum: Developmental/Cognitive 
(F;3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 136 or Ps 147 

Designed to help students achieve an understanding of the logic 
of psychological research through the "hands on" experience of 
designing and conducting a psychological experiment and criti- 
cally interpreting the results. The research will focus on issues 
related to the developing child and human thinking. Opportun- 
ities for developmental research will depend, in part, upon the 
availability of subjects. Michael Moore 

Ps 306 Research Methods Practicum: Social Psychology 

(S;3) 

Prerequisite: Ps 131 or Ps 249 

This practicum is designed to introduce students to research 

methods used by social psychologists to study topics such as 

social interaction and person perception. The course has two 

primary foci: how to critically read existing research and how to 

carry out a research project. Primary emphasis will be on the 

experimental method although other methods such as naturalistic 

observation and field studies will be described. 

Marianne LaFrance 

Ps 308 Research Methods Practicum: Conflict Resolution (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 131, Ps 121, Ps 267 or Ps 246 

Research on issues pertaining to the causes of and remedies for 

interpersonal and intergroup conflict. Murray Horwitz 

Ps 309 Research Methods Practicum: Family Dynamics (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 131, Ps 101, Ps 246 or Ps 267 
Research on issues pertaining to the interrelations between in- 
dividual and family dynamics. Murray Horwitz 

Ps 310 Research Methods Practicum: Group Dynamics (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 131 or Ps 256 

This course is devoted to familiarizing students with all phases 
of the research process from formation of the problem through 
preparation of a research report. Although readings will be as- 
signed, the primary vehicle for learning is the study that each 
student will conduct as a member of a research team. The inves- 
tigation will be directed to some aspect of small group behavior 
of interest to both students and professor. Studies will ordinarily 
be experimental but other models may be employed if better 
suited to the problem. Grades will be based on a final research 
report submitted by each student. Performance in conducting the 
research and students' contribution to all other phases of the 
process will also be considered. Norman Berkowitz 

Ps 312 Research Methods Practicum: Personality and Social 
Cognition (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 101' and an undergraduate course in statistics 
Processes of "social cognition" — how we evaluate, organize, and 
understand information that pertains to the social world — sig- 
nificantly influence how we relate to each other and to ourselves. 
Not surprisingly, therefore, several theories of personality, in- 
cluding cognitive, phenomenological, and self theories, devote 
considerable attention to the topic of social cognition. The re- 
search practicum will emphasize the design and implementation 
of experiments that examine relationships between social cog- 



82 / Arts and Sciences 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 



nition and personality variables (e.g., self-awareness, self- 
monitoring). William Nasby 

Ps 313 Research Methods Practicum: Symbolic Processes (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 147 or Ps 158 or Ps 251 or consent of instructor 
In this practicum, students carry out research on symbolic pro- 
cesses. The focus is on cognitive processes used in the arts (es- 
pecially the visual arts and literature). The arts are viewed as 
symbol systems that must be "read;" such reading calls upon 
cognitive skills in the perceiver. Research topics may include 
questions such as: How are metaphors understood? How is the 
style of a work of art perceived? What makes a painting (or story) 
seem balanced? Is sensitivity to "good design" in pictures related 
to or independent of sensitivity to good design in stories? Subjects 
to be "tested" will be adults and/or children. Ellen Winner 

Ps 314 Research Methods Practicum: Human Infancy (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor 

Infancy research is conducted within two different paradigms — 
observation, usually in hospital or the home, and experimental 
procedures, most often conducted in the laboratory. Students will 
participate in a study employing one of the methods characteristic 
of either of the above paradigms, e.g., observation of mother-infant 
interaction, ecological analysis, experimentation with the heart 
rate measure, etc. Familiarity with the general infancy literature 
as well as a more in-depth knowledge of the studies of the problem 
to be tackled will be expected. 

John D. Golenski, S.J. 

Courses Open to Advanced 
Undergraduates and Graduates 

Ps 603 Practical Psychology for the Nurse (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

The content of this course, drawn from the instructor's experience 
as a support psychologist for a hospital nursing department, is 
intended as a compendium of practical knowledge and tech- 
niques which nurse will find helpful in the health care setting. 
The course will focus on specific relationships (patient-care giver, 
physician-nurse, nurse-nurse, etc.) and particular problem situ- 
ations (the "non-compliant" patient, conflict within the health 
care team, the dying patient, chronic illness and its effects upon 
patients, families, and caregivers, the "angry" patient, inappro- 
priate and demanding physicians, etc.) Class meetings will vary 
with lecture-discussions alternating with actual role-playing as 
well as field experiences. John D. Golenski, S.J. 

Ps 633 Stress and Adaptation (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ps 074 and Ps 121 or Ps 101 or Ps 131 
Stress has been implicated as a causal factor in physical and 
emotional disorders and in social malfunctioning. This seminar 
is designed to examine the basic theory of stress and its relation- 
ship to effective adaptation, well-being, and maladaptation. Re- 
cent research on the effects of different forms of stress on 
psychosocial and physical functioning will be the themes of stu- 
dent reports and presentations. Marc Fried 

Cross-listed Courses 

Ps 600 Introduction to Social Work (F, S; 3) 

This course, offered by the Department of Sociology and the Grad- 
uate School of Social Work, is a broad survey of the field of social 
work, starting with a brief discussion of human behavior. We 
then deal with individuals, groups and communities. In addition 
to a consideration of social work methodology, we will examine 
the historical roots, value foundations and modi operandi of the 
settings in which social work is practiced. Dwight S. Adams 

Albert F. Hanwell 

Ps 721 Human Behavior and the Social Environment (F, S; 3) 

This Graduate School of Social Work course does not satisfy the 
University Social Science Core requirement but may be taken 
toward completion of the Psychology major by consent of the 
instructor, only. 

A foundation course in which the unifying theme is the concept 
of self as a complex of bio-psycho-social forces which become 
synthesized through the integrative functions of the human ego. 
The person is viewed as a social being who is interacting with 



an inter-personal and institutional environment which not only 
has an impact on, but which is also affected by, the individual. 
The course is taught from a social work frame of reference within 
which the concept of self is examined in relation to the life cycle, 
to ethnic and sexual aspects of identity and self-esteem as these 
are manifested in social roles, and to those extra-familial systems 
which may constrain or support the psychosocial development 
of the individual. The course is structured in modules charac- 
terized by a highly individualized method of learning in which 
students may move at their own pace in mastering required 
content. Frederick L. Ahearn 

Pei N. Chen 

Kathleen A. O'Donoghue 

Elaine Pinderhughes 



Romance Languages 
and Literatures 



Faculty 

Professor Emeritus Joseph D. Gauthier, S.J., B.S., Trinity College; 
A.M., Boston College; S.T.L., Weston College; D.esL., Laval Uni- 
versity 

Professor Guillermo L. Guitarte, Profesorado, Filosofia y Letras 
Buenos Aires 

Professor Vera G. Lee, Chairperson of the Department 

A.B., Russell Sage College; A.M., Yale University; Ph.D., Boston 

University 

Professor J. Enrique Ojeda, Licenciado, Universidad Catolica Del 
Ecuador; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor Maria Simonelli, Dotre in Lettere e Filosofia, University 
of Florence; Libera Docenza in Filologia romanza, Rome 

Professor Rebecca M. Valette, Director, Language Laboratory 
A.B., Mount Holyoke College; Ph.D., University of Colorado 

Professor Georges Zayed, L.esL., M.esL., University of Cairo; Doc- 
torat d'Etat, Sorbonne 

Associate Professor Norman Araujo, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Associate Professor Joseph Figurito, A.B., Boston College; A.M., 
D.M.L., Middlebury College 

Associate Professor Monique E. Fol, A.B., L.L.B., University of 
Paris; A.M., University of California at Berkeley; Ph.D., University 
of Nice 

Associate Professor Betty Rahv, A.B., Sweet Briar College; A.M., 
Middlebury College; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Associate Professor Robert L. Sheehan, B.S., Boston College; A.M., 
Ph.D., Boston University 

Assistant Professor Salvatore Cappelletti, A.B., Providence College; 
A.M., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Brown University 

Assistant Professor Jill Syverson, A.B., Smith College; A.M., Ph.D., 
Harvard University 



Program Description 

Plan A: Literary Focus 

The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures offers 
courses in French, Italian and Spanish. Students majoring in this 
discipline may concentrate in French, Italian or Spanish and may 
also take a non-romance language as a second language. Thirty- 
six credits must be completed by majors within the following 
curriculum of courses: 

1) Advanced Composition (6) 

2) Survey of Literature (6) 

3) A minimum of two period or genre courses in literature (12) 



Arts and Sciences / 83 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 



4) Two electives to be chosen from the following: 

a) A second foreign language (6) 

b) Comparative or Interdepartmental course (6) 

c) A third period of the major literature (6) 

d) Cultural backgrounds of literature (6) 

e) Phonetics (3) 

f) Advanced Conversation (3) 

g) Linguistics (3) 



Plan B: Cultural Focus 

Phonetics and Advanced Conversation 

Culture Courses given in the major language 

Survey of the Major Literature 

Advanced Composition 

Period or Genre 

Electives 



6 
6 
6 
6 
3 
9 



In addition to the traditional Romance Languages electives, elec- 
tives for this new language and culture major may include Com- 
position, Conversation and Reading and up to six credits in 
related courses offered by other departments. 

General Information 

It is recommended particularly to majors who intend to go on to 
graduate work, that they initiate the study of a second foreign 
language in their sophomore year. For this purpose, courses may 
be taken in any of the languages listed above. 

The major curriculum in Romance Languages is designed to 
give students an active command of one foreign language and at 
least a working knowledge of another, a broad insight into the 
literature and culture of other nations, and a solid preparation for 
graduate studies in the field. 

Although many language majors begin their sequence by taking 
Survey of Literature in their freshman year, it is possible to major 
in Romance Languages with only two years of high school prep- 
aration. (Students who begin the study of the major language in 
college should plan to take an intermediate course during the 
summer following their freshman year.) 

Students who plan to major in Romance Languages should 
consult the Assistant Chairperson of the Department with respect 
to their qualifications and the organization of a program to suit 
their individual needs and objectives. 

Program for Majors in the School of Education 



6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
3 
3 



Plan A 




1st year 


Survey 


*2nd year 


Advanced Conversation 




Century Course 


3rd year 


Advanced Composition 




Cultural Background 


4th year 


Century Course 




Department Elective 



36 Credits 

The courses suggested for Sophomore and Junior years may be 
taken in any order so long as all four courses are completed 
before Senior year. 



Flan B 
1st year 

2nd year 
3rd year 
4th year 



Composition, Conversation, and 
Reading Course 
(Rl 101-106 inclusive) 

Survey 

Advanced Conversation 

Advanced Composition 

Cultural Background 

Century Course 

Department Elective 



6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
3 
3 



36 Credits 



Honors Program 



Qualified students wishing to enter The Honors Program should 
secure the Chairman's permission to do so at the end of the Soph- 
omore year and no later than the end of the first semester of the 



Junior year. In addition to the usual requirements for a major, 
honors students will take a three-credit seminar in the spring 
semester of their Junior year (Junior Honors Seminar). Qualified 
students who plan to take Junior Year Abroad may enroll in The 
Junior Seminar in the second semester of their Sophomore year, 
with departmental approval. During the Senior year, the honors 
student takes three credits each semester in independent study 
leading to an honors thesis. This is done under the guidance of 
a deparmental advisor. The thesis should be submitted no later 
than April 1. 

An oral examination of no more than one hour's duration, con- 
ducted in the candidate's major language, will cover the periods 
of literature included in his course curriculum, as well as the 
scope of the thesis. 

A departmental committee will conduct the examination, eval- 
uate the essay and formulate a recommendation for Honors which 
will be incorporated into the student's academic record. 



Course Offerings 

French 

Rl 001-002 Elementary French (F, S; 3, 3) 

An introduction to the study of French. This course begins with 
development of some of the fundamental skills: reading ability, 
aural comprehension and controlled oral expression. Class in- 
struction is supplemented by optional laboratory work. 

The Department 

Rl 051-052 Intermediate French (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Rl 001-002 or its equivalent. 

The prime object of this course is to consolidate previous lan- 
guage study into a functional body of knowledge. A review of the 
elements of French will be supplemented with the reading of 
selected texts, oral practice and optional laboratory work. 

The Department 

Rl 101-102 Composition, Conversation and Readings in French 

(F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: three to four years of solid high school preparation 
or two years of college preparation. 

This course offers a review of syntax and grammar. Selected con- 
temporary masterpieces will be used to develop further skill in 
comprehension, conversation and composition. 

The Department 

Rl 203-204 French Conversational Skills (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is designed for students who have completed a basic 
sequence in French language courses and who wish to develop 
greater fluency in conversation. 

Pronunciation will be improved through a program in French 
phonics which emphasizes the relationship between the spoken 
and the written language. Exercises in role-playing, vocabulary 
building, syntax and guided speaking activities will help develop 
conversational skills for everyday situations. 

Cynthia Nicholson 

Rl 296 French Conversation Hour for Greycliff Residents 
(F, S; 3) 

Students residing in the French House will meet weekly for di- 
rected discussion in French under the guidance of a faculty mem- 
ber. 

A requisite for residency in Greycliff, attendance required. 

The Department 

Rl 300 Practicum in French (F, S; 3, 3) 

Qualified students will spend approximately 6 hours a week in- 
terning in fields such as travel, publishing, education and com- 
merce, making active use of French. For class they will research 
and present reports on their areas of internship. Vera G. Lee 

Rl 303 French Phonetics and Oral Expression (F; 3) 

A practical introduction to pronunciation and oral expression. 
The course is designed to help the student improve command of 
spoken French and to develop awareness of how the French lan- 
guage functions. Classwork and individual exercises will be sup- 



84 / Arts and Sciences 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 



plemented by laboratory work. The course is particularly 
recommended for future teachers of French. 

Rebecca M. Vedette 

Rl 304 Advanced French Conversation (S; 3) 

This course is designed to give advanced students and prospec- 
tive teachers of French a greater facility in the spoken language. 
Aural comprehension and fluency of expression will be devel- 
oped through group discussion, individual exposes, taped inter- 
views and literary recordings. This course is recommended for 
all students who plan to teach French. Rebecca M. Valette 

Rl 305-306 Advanced French Composition and Introduction to 
Literary Analysis (F, S; 3, 3) 

The purpose of this course is to strengthen the students' mastery 
of French syntax and difficult grammatical problems, so that they 
may express themselves correctly and accurately in expository 
writing. Students will be introduced to techniques of close lit- 
erary analysis. This is a required course for French majors. Con- 
ducted in French. The Department 

Rl 307-308 Survey of French Literature (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: four years of solid high school preparation or two 
years of college. 

An introduction to the study of French literature. Selected texts 
from the Middle Ages to the 20th century will be analyzed against 
the background of historical events and European literary move- 
ments. This is a required course for French majors, open also to 
other qualified students with superior linguistic preparation. This 
course is a prerequisite for all advanced literature courses. Con- 
ducted in French. The Department 

Rl 311 Political and Social Structures in French Literature (F; 3) 

This course intends to review the development of ideas with 
particular emphasis on social structures and political institutions 
from the Middle Ages to the Third Republic in order to place 
selected literary works in their historical and social perspective 
and to show to what degree French literature is a social testimony. 
Conducted in French. Monique E. Fol 

Rl 397-398 Roman et Societe sous la III Republique (F, S; 3, 3) 

The novel, while being a fiction, a product of the imagination, 
is by necessity bound to reality and reflects to a certain extent 
society and its conflicts. This course intends to study a number 
of novels and selections which show how the authors bear wit- 
ness to reality even in their attempts to transform it or escape 
from it. This problem will be examined in Zola, Maurras, Barres, 
Romain-Rolland, Proust, Colette, Nathalie Sarraute, among 
others. Monique E. Fol 

Rl 421-422 French Literature of the Renaissance (F, S; 3, 3) 

A study of the historical, philosophical and literary movements 
which molded the French Renaissance. Selections from Rabelais, 
the poets of the Pleiade, Montaigne, and others, will be read as 
reflections of humanistic ideals, wars of religion, and the search 
for the Good Life in the sixteenth century. Betty T. Rahv 

Rl 436 The Comedies of Moliere (F; 3) 

A study of the development of the theatre and the life of Jean 
Baptiste Poquelin, the man called Moliere. He will be treated as 
a playwright, director and actor who criticizes all aspects of his 
era. The following plays will be discussed: Les Precieuses Ridi- 
cules, L'Impromptu de Versailles, Le Misanthrope, Le Tartuffe, 
Don Juan, L'Avare, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme and Le Malade 

Imaginaire.Joseph Figurito 

Rl 451-452 Romanticism in French Literature (F, S; 3, 3) 

A study of Romanticism in French poetry, drama and narrative 
literature of the nineteenth century, with detailed analysis of the 
masterpieces. Selections from the works of Lamartine, Hugo, 
Musset and Vigny, Madame de Stael, Chateaubriand, Stendhal, 
Balzac and others. Norman Araujo 

Rl 453 Stendhal, Balzac and Flaubert (F; 3) 

The evolution of the realist novel in the nineteenth century as it 
appears in the works of three of its outstanding exponents. Beyl- 
isme, Bovarysme and the universe of the Comedie humaine. 



Rl 454 Romantic Poetry of the Nineteenth Century (S; 3) 

The literary doctrine, themes and artistic virtuosity of the Ro- 
mantic poets, as they appear in the most significant creations of 
Lamartine, Hugo, Musset and Vigny. Norman Araujo 

Rl 464 Les Temoins du Moment (1949-1962) (S; 3) 

The impact of the German occupation, the Indochina and Alge- 
rian Wars on some novelists: Camus, Jean Cayrol, Malraux, Ni- 
mier, Sartre, and Kateb Yacine. Monique E. Fol 

Rl 465 Le Jeune Roman Feminin (S; 3) 

Simone de Beauvoir, Frangoise Sagan, Marguerite Yourcenar and 
Marguerite Duras dominated the field of women writers in the 
1950's and 1960's. A more recent generaton of distinguished and 
capable writers make up the core of this course. Among them, 
Rochefort, de Rivoyre, Philipe, Prou, Cardinal, Etcherelli. 

Rev. Joseph Gauthier 

Rl 483-484 French Poetry from Baudelaire to Surrealism 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

A study of the birth and the development of modern French 
poetry from the middle of the 19th century to the Second World 
War: Baudelaire and Les FJeurs du Mai, the Parnassian poets, the 
Symbolist poets; Verlaine, Mallarme, Rimbaud; the poets of the 
beginning of the 20th century: Valery, Apollinaire, Peguy, Clau- 
del; the surrealist poets. The characteristics of the poetry and 
selected texts. Georges Zayed 

Rl 485-86 Roman et Poesie (F, S; 3, 3) 

A study of the great literary theories and of the major novelists 
and poets who exerted an influence on the different currents of 
thought in the 20th century: Bourget, Gide, Proust, Mauriac, 
Sartre, Camus, Valery, Peguy, Claudel, Apollinaire, etc. 

Georges Zayed 

Rl 491-492 Classical Paris Recaptured: The Marais (F, S; 3, 3) 

The Marais section of Paris, at its height in the 16th through 18th 
centuries, has been undergoing a face-lifting since 1964. This 
course will examine the artistic, literary, and political merits of 
the Marais, both past and present, through slides and lectures. 
Selected readings will be assigned in literature, history, and the 
fine arts. Betty T. Rahv 



Italian 

Rl 003-004 Elementary Italian (F, S; 3, 3) 

An introduction to the study of Italian. This course begins the 
development of some of the fundamental skills: reading ability, 
aural comprehension and controlled oral expression. Class in- 
struction is supplemented by optional laboratory work. 

The Department 

Rl 053-054 Intermediate Italian (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Rl 003-004 or its equivalent. 

The prime object of this course is to consolidate previous lan- 
guage study into a functional body of knowledge. A review of the 
elements of Italian will be supplemented with the reading of 
selected texts, oral practice and laboratory work. 

The Department 

Rl 103-104 The Individualized Program (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: three to four years of solid high school preparation 
or two years of college preparation. 

This course is structured according to students' individual needs 
in order to ensure mastery of the Italian language as a tool of 
communication. Selected contemporary masterpieces, para-lit- 
erature, newspapers, music, special topics, etc. will be used to 
develop further skill in conversation (class meetings are used for 
conversational practice), reading and writing. 

Salvatore Cappelletti 

Rl 315 Advanced Italian Composition and Conversation (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: three years of college preparation or four years of 
high school preparation. 

The purpose of this course is to strengthen the students' mastery 
of written and spoken Italian. Group discussion, individual pres- 
entations, expository writing (based on selected masterpieces and 
special topics) will be used to develop fluency in Italian. 

Salvatore Cappelletti 



Arts and Sciences / 85 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 



Rl 317-318 Survey of Italian Literature (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: four years of solid high school preparation or two 
years of college. 

An introduction to the study of Italian literature. Masterpieces 
from the Middle Ages to the 20th century will be analyzed against 
the background of historical events and European literary move- 
ments. This is a required course for Italian majors, open also to 
other qualified students with a superior linguistic preparation. 
Conducted in Italian. Maria P. Simonelli 

Rl 501-502 Dante's Divine Comedy (F, S; 3, 3) 

The course aims at providing a comprehensive interpretation of 
the Divine Comedy. Students are required to read in the entire 
text. The main interpretative problems will be discussed in class. 
The first semester will be devoted to both Inferno and Purgatorio. 
A detailed explanation of Paradiso will be presented in the sec- 
ond semester. Maria P. Simonelli 

Rl 503 Boccaccio (F; 3) 

The first class will be an introduction to the historical and literary 
background of Boccaccio's Era. This will be followed by a study 
of Boccaccio's life and works during the Neapolitan and the Flor- 
entine periods. 

The Decamerone has to be read in its entirety; selected short 
stories from each day of this masterpeice will be analyzed, and 
reference will be made to the other works of Boccaccio. 

Joseph Figurito 

Rl 564 Contemporary Italian Novel (S; 3) 

A study of major Italian novelists of the 20th century. Special 
attention will be devoted to the works of Svevo, Moravia, Vit- 
torini, Levi, Silone and Pavese. The course will consist of lectures 
and class discussion with class participation counting towards 
the final grade. Conducted in Italian. Salvatore Cappelletti 



Spanish 

Rl 005-006 Elementary Spanish (F, S; 3, 3) 

An introduction to the study of Spanish. This course begins with 
development of some of the fundamental skills: reading ability, 
aural comprehension and controlled oral expression. Class in- 
struction is supplemented by optional laboratory work. 

The Department 

Rl 011-012 Conversational Spanish for Nurses and Social 
Workers (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course intends to provide the students with a basic knowl- 
edge of Spanish grammar and to develop their ability to converse 
in the language. Special attention will be given to the vocabulary 
and dialogues related to medicine, nursing and social work. 

The Department 

Rl 055-056 Intermediate Spanish (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Rl 005-006 or its equivalent. 

The prime object of this course is to consolidate previous lan- 
guage study into a functional body of knowledge. A review of the 
elements of Spanish will be supplemented with the reading of 
selected texts, oral practice and optional laboratory work. 

The Department 

Rl 105-106 Composition, Conversation, and Readings in Spanish 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: three to four years of solid high school preparation 
or two years of college preparation. 

This course offers a review of syntax and grammar. Selected con- 
temporary masterpieces will be used to develop further skill in 
comprehension, conversation and composition. 

The Department 

Rl 223-224 Spanish Conversational Skills (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course is designed for students who have completed a basic 
sequence in Spanish language courses and who wish to develop 
greater fluency in conversation. 

Pronunciation will be improved through a program in Spanish 
phonics which emphasizes the relationship between the spoken 
and the written language. Exercises in role-playing, vocabulary 



building, syntax and guided speaking activities will help develop 
conversational skills for everyday situations. The Department 

Rl 298 Spanish Conversation Hour for Greycliff Residents (F, S; 3) 

Students residing in the Spanish House will meet weekly for 
directed discussion in Spanish under the guidance of a faculty 
member. A requisite for residency in Greycliff, attendance re- 
quired. Jill Syverson-Stork 

Rl 321-322 Spanish Practicum (F, S; 3, 3) 

Students are placed with various Hispanic organizations in the 
Boston area to increase their fluency in Spanish through personal 
and continued contact with the language. Classroom seminars, 
Hispanic guest lecturers, and videotapes in Spanish complement 
the students' internship experiences. Readings by Oscar Lewin, 
Babin, Thomas, Maldonado-Denis and others. Permission of 
instructor. Nancy Levy 

Rl 323 Spanish Phonetics (F; 3) 

A practical theoretical, and historical introduction to Spanish 
pronunciation, sentence structure, and word classes. The course 
is designed to help the student improve command of spoken 
Spanish and to develop an awareness of how the Spanish lan- 
guage functions. Guillermo Guitarte 

Rl 324 Advanced Spanish Conversation (S; 3) 

This course is designed to give advanced students and prospec- 
tive teachers of Spanish a greater facility in the spoken language. 
An introduction to descriptive phonetics is integrated with ex- 
ercises of pronunciation and intonation. Aural comprehension 
and fluency of expression will be developed through group dis- 
cussion, individual exposes, taped interviews and literary re- 
cordings. This course is recommended for all students who plan 
to teach Spanish. The Department 

Rl 325-326 Advanced Spanish Composition and Introduction to 
Literary Analysis (F, S; 3, 3) 

The purpose of this course is to strengthen the students' mastery 
of Spanish syntax and difficult grammatical problems so that they 
may express themselves correctly and accurately in expository 
writing. Students will be introduced to techniques of close lit- 
erary analysis. Not for graduate credit. Conducted in Spanish. 

/. Enrique Ojeda 

Rl 327-328 Survey of Spanish Literature (F, S; 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: four years of solid high school preparation or two 
years of college. 

An introduction to the study of Spanish literature. Selected texts 
from the Middle Ages to the 20th century will be analyzed against 
the background of historical events and European literary move- 
ments. This is a required course for Spanish majors open also to 
other qualified students with superior linguistic preparation. 
Conducted in Spanish. Robert L. Sheehan 

Rl 329 Cultural Background of Spanish Literature (F; 3) 

A study of the historical and cultural factors bearing upon Span- 
ish literature. Mutual influences and interplay between history 
and the arts on one hand and literature on the other. The impact 
of major historical events, the great monarchs and artists upon 
the literature will be traced from medieval times to the 
present. Robert L. Sheehan 

Rl 331-332 A Conversational Approach to Contemporary Spain 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

An advanced conversation course open to native speakers of Eng- 
lish with basic oral proficiency in Spanish. Designed to prepare 
students for daily living in Spain during Junior Year Abroad or 
Summer Study programs, and for improving note-taking skills in 
lecture courses given in the Spanish language. 

Robert L. Sheehan 

Rl 367 (Hs 367) Spanish History: From the Reconquest through the 
Golden Age (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
This course will deal with the period from the reconquest of the 
Iberian peninsula from the Muslims through the seventeenth cen- 
tury, from the "open" and diverse society that was unique to 
Spain in the middle ages, to the "closed" society of the seven- 
teenth century. Emphasis will be placed on the social, economic, 



86 / Arts and Sciences 

SLAVIC AND EASTERN LANGUAGES 



and political patterns that emerged from the reconquest and the 
problem of why and how many of these patterns were altered 
during the subsequent period, the age of Spain's greatness. Among 
topics to be studied are: the free society of the medieval moving 
frontier; the changing role and position of Spain's religious and 
racial minorities, the Jews and Muslims; the Inquisition; Spain's 
emergence as a world power and its effect on the nation's society 
and economy; the church and religious life; criminals, social out- 
casts, the poor, etc. Because the literature of the period frequently 
mirrored contemporary society, when available and appropriate 
it will be utilized as source material. Ellen G. Friedman 

Rl 368 (Hs 368) Modern Spain: From the Eighteenth Century 
to the Present (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of Hs 001 through Hs 098. 
This course will deal with Spanish history from the eighteenth 
century, through the Franco dictatorship, and up to the new dem- 
ocratic system of the present day. The emphasis will be on the 
emergence of "two Spains" — the old, traditional Spain, opposed 
to change, and the "new Spain," that first seeks moderate change 
on a European model, but later turns to radicalism — and the con- 
flict between them. We will examine various movements on the 
right and the left, including, but not limited to, liberalism, so- 
cialism, anarchism, Carlism, and falangism, as well as phenom- 
ena such as regionalism, anti-clericalism, and working-class 
unrest. Ellen Friedman 

Rl 615-616 Survey of Spanish Literature of the Middle Ages 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

The course covers the evolution of Spanish Literature, from its 
origins at the dawn of the Middle Ages to the fifteenth century. 
The development of oral literature, the use of Spanish in scientific 
and didactic prose, and the first tentatives of an artistic use of 
the vulgar language in the late Middle Ages are 
examined. Guillermo L. Guitarte 

Rl 633 Spanish Drama of The Golden Age (F; 3) 

A textual and contexual study of the popular "comedia nueva" 
in Spain, with attention paid to its origins and development. 
Class time will be spent in lecture (two times per week), and 
discussion of the dramas of Lope, Alarcon, Guillen de Castro, 
Tirso, Calderon and others. Jill Syverson-Stork 

Rl 651-52 19th-century Spanish Literature (F, S; 3, 3) 

Against the intense and often violent historical background of the 
19th century, the course intends to study the main literary cur- 
rents of the period: neoclassicism, romanticism, costumbrism, 
realism and naturalism. Among the authors to be covered are 
Larra, Becquer, Mesonero Romanos, Alarcon, Valera, Pereda, 
Galdos, Pardo Bazan. 

Rl 674 The Short Story in Latin America (S; 3) 

Many of the finest contemporary authors in Latin America — 
Borges, Rulfo, Cortazar, Garcia Marquez — have chosen the short 
story as their medium. We shall study the origins and the de- 
velopment of the short story in Latin America focusing upon 
narrative techniques, style and the vision of Latin America por- 
trayed by these authors. Conducted in Spanish. 

Rl 917 Medieval Spanish Prose (F; 3) 

Origins and development of didactic prose: Alfonso el Sabio and 
the Infante don Juan Manuel. The awakening of interest in the 
personal: history and biography. The beginnings of the novel: La 
Celestina. Guillermo L. Guitarte 

Rl 976 Jorge Luis Borges (F; 3) 

Borges as a short-story writer: his imaginary world, his conception 
of time, his narrative technique. Books to be considered in the 
course will be: Historia Universal de la in/amia, Ficciones, and 
El Aleph. Guillermo L. Guitarte 



Romance Literature, Methodology and 
Philology Courses Offered in English 

Rl 382 The Birth of Europe's Lyric Poetry: An Introduction to the 
Medieval Literature of Southern France (F; 3) 

The description of the basic features of the Old Provencal lan- 
guage will be accompanied by the analysis of poetic texts. Se- 



lected works of Provengal authors will be used to describe their 
function as models for the development of a large portion of later 
European literature. 

Rl 384 Latin Paleography (S; 3) 

Graphic signs and their different use in various centers and during 
several centuries will be studied as marks and "symptoms" of 
the changing conditions in the Medieval world. The study of this 
crucial aspect of the cultural tradition of the Latin West will 
include the analysis of paleographic documents. 

Rl 395 Introduction to Romance Linguistics (F; 3) 

The course is intended as an introductory survey in the field of 
linguistics for students of Romance Languages. A survey of the 
basic concepts of linguistics and their application to the Romance 
Languages in particular. 

The topics included provide insights into language useful in 
such areas as elementary and secondary education, foreign lan- 
guage teaching, speech and speech therapy, psychology and so- 
ciology. The Department 

Rl 699 Honors Seminar in French, Spanish and Italian (S; 3) 

Jill Syverson-Stork 

Bi-Lingual Education Courses 

Rl 391 Caribbean History and Culture (S; 3) 

This course will deal with the social, economic and cultural his- 
tory of the main islands of the Caribbean. It will also consider 
the impact of the Caribbean on the American scene. 

The Department 

Rl 394 Methods in Bi-lingual Education (S; 3) 

This course will explore the history, methods and materials of 
bilingual education. It will deal with some of the problems of the 
new minorities and how education can help in dealing with them. 

The Department 



Slavic and Eastern Languages 



Faculty 

Professor Lawrence G. Jones, A.B., Lafayette College; A.M., Co- 
lumbia University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Irina Agushi, A.B., University of Melbourne; 
A.M., Indiana University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Michael J. Connolly, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment 
A.B., Boston College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Michael B. Kreps, Diploma, Leningrad 
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley) 

Lecturer Marina V. Kreps, M. A. , Herzen Pedagogical Institute, Len- 
ingrad 

Lecturer Jovina Y. H. Ting, A.B., Guoli Taiwan Daixue; M.A., Kent 
State University; M.A., Harvard; Ph.D., New York University. 



Program Descriptions 

The Department administers undergraduate majors in General 
Linguistics, in Russian, and in Slavic Studies. Each major pro- 
gram consists of at least twelve one-semester courses at upper- 
division levels (courses numbered 200 and above). Departmental 
honors require nomination by the faculty and successful com- 
pletion of honors comprehensive requirements. 

Major in Linguistics: 

Students majoring in Linguistics build their programs around a 
specific area of concentration, the most common of which are 
Philology and Speech Pathology. The following listing represents 
the normal program for these two concentrations. 



Arts and Sciences / 87 

SLAVIC AND EASTERN LANGUAGES 



—General Linguistics (SI 311/En 527); 

— concentration in Philology: five courses of a philological na- 
ture (e.g. Sanskrit, Old English, Old Irish, Old Persian & 
Avestan, Classical Armenian, Old Church Slavonic, Old Rus- 
sian, Middle High German, Old French & Provengal, Palaeog- 
raphy, History of the Romance Languages, Greek or Latin or 
Hebrew philology); 

concentration in Speech Pathology: Introduction to Speech 
Pathology, Language Acquisition or Audiology, Anatomy & 
Physiology of the Vocal Mechanism, Articulation Theories 
and Therapies, Diagnostic Procedures; 

— three linguistics 'topics' courses such as Syntax & Semantics, 
Indo-European, Poetic Theory, Language of Liturgy, Topics 
in Linguistic Theory, Applied English Grammar & Style, var- 
ious advanced tutorials: 

— for Philology concentrators: three courses of a language-re- 
lated nature from non-language departments (e.g. psychology 
of language, non-verbal communication, language acquisi- 
tion, speech pathology & aphasia, applied linguistics, arti- 
ficial intelligence, linguistic philosophy, anthropology); 
for Speech Pathology concentrators: three courses from the 
above grouping (excluding speech pathology) or from courses 
of a philological nature. 

The Department expects students concentrating in Philology 
to have proficiency in at least one classical and one modern lan- 
guage and to acquire a familiarity with at least two additional 
language areas. Students concentrating in Speech Pathology are 
expected to acquire a working knowledge of at least one modern 
language and a reading knowledge of one additional language, 
and further to be able to work with at least one of the following: 
a computer language, a sign language, or Greek and Latin medical 
terminology. 

The focus of the linguistics program does not lie in the simple 
acquisition of language skills, but rather in the analysis of lin- 
guistic phenomena with a view toward learning to make signif- 
icant generalizations about the nature of language. 

Major in Russian (normal program): 

— four courses in Russian grammar, composition and stylistics 
at or above the 200-level; 

— four courses on Russian literature, of which at least two must 
be at the 300-level; 

— one course in General Linguistics; 

— Old Church Slavonic or Old Russian; 

— two electives from Russian literature, second Slavic lan- 
guages, or linguistics offerings. 

The Department also recommends at least two courses from 
related areas in other departments; e.g. in Russian history, art, 
political science, economics, philosophy, theology, etc. 

Major in Slavic Studies (normal program): 

— two Russian language courses beyond the level of Interme- 
diate Intensive Russian; 

— two courses on Russian literature; 

— Old Church Slavonic or Old Russian or a second Slavic/East 
European language; 

— two courses on Russian/Soviet/East European history; 

— one course on Russian/Soviet philosophy; 

— one course on Soviet/East European politics; 

— one course on Soviet economics; 

— two electives from an emphasis area in Slavic & East Euro- 
pean studies. 

An honors AB in Slavic Studies automatically entails conferral 
of the proficiency certificate of the Center for East Europe, Russia, 
and Asia. 



Course Offerings 

Courses offered annually are so marked; all other courses are 
offered as parts of varying course cycles, and information for any 
given year may be found in the Registrar's Schedule of Courses. 



SI 003-004 Elementary Russian I/II (F, S; 4, 4) 

A course for beginners that stresses thorough training in Russian 
grammar, accompanied by reading exercises and elementary com- 
position. Additional conversation and language-laboratory work 
required. 
Offered annually Michael /. Connolly 

SI 009-010 Elementary Chinese I/II (F, S; 4, 4) 

An introduction to the speaking, reading, character writing, and 
comprehension of the modern Chinese literary language (Man- 
darin). Additional conversation and language-laboratory work 
required. 
Offered annually Ting Yueh-hung 

SI 053-054 Intermediate Intensive Russian I/II (F, S; 6, 6) 

A review of major difficulties in Russian grammar, extensive prac- 
tice in the reading, translation, paraphrase and analysis of se- 
lected Russian texts, plus, in a special practicum, additional 
vocabulary work, grammar drills and conversation. 

Students requiring only one of the two concurrent portions of 
this course may enroll under SI 051-052 (Intermediate Russian 
I/II) or SI 057-058 (Russian Practicum: Intermediate I/II) respec- 
tively. 

Offered annually Lawrence G. /ones 

Marina V. Kreps 

SI 061-062 Intermediate Chinese I/II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Continuation of course work in spoken and written Mandarin 
Chinese and the development of specialized vocabularies for var- 
ious fields of study. Ting Yueh-hung 

SI 200 A Survey of Russian Literature (in translation) (F; 3) 

Reading, analysis, discussion of representative works, authors 

and movements in Russian literature from the eighteenth century 

up to the present day. 

Lectures and readings in English. 

Offered annually Lawrence G. /ones 

SI 205 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (in translation) (S; 3) 

A comparative presentation of Russia's two major writers. Their 
different perceptions of reality, their views on art, civilization, 
Christian ethics, etc., are discussed in connection with their prin- 
cipal novels. Lectures and readings in English. Irina Agushi 

Michael B. Kreps 

SI 216 (En 552) Poetic Theory (S; 3) 

Traditional and contemporary theories of prosody and metre will 
be described and analyzed within the framework of modern struc- 
tural and generative approaches to language as well as from the 
viewpoint of (Russian) Formalism. Textual material will be 
mainly English, although students may present texts in any lan- 
guage for required papers. Lawrence G. /ones 

SI 221 (Th 198) The Language of Liturgy (S; 3) 

The application of structural techniques to an analysis of liturg- 
ical form both in the poetic-religious context of the language of 
worship and in the more broadly based systems of non-verbal 
symbolism (music, gesture, vestments and 

appointments). Michael /. Connolly 

SI 225 Russian Folklore (in translation) (S; 3) 

The world of Russian folk traditions and writings from the earliest 

times: fairy tales, legends, epics, religion, art, music, and daily 

life. 

Readings and lectures in English. Irina Agushi 

SI 227 Advanced Russian Grammar (F; 3) 

Intensive reading of difficult Russian texts, translation from Eng- 
lish into Russian, correct expository composition and a review 
of fine points of Russian grammar. Conducted in Russian. 
Offered annually Irina Agushi 

Michael B. Kreps 

SI 228 Spoken Russian (F; 3) 

Practical phonetics and intonation, syntactic and stylistic char- 
acteristics of the spoken language, extensive conversational prac- 
tice and speaking exercises. Conducted in Russian. 
Offered annually Irina Agushi 

Marina V. Kreps 



88 / Arts and Sciences 

SLAVIC AND EASTERN LANGUAGES 



SI 233 (En 571) Applied English Grammar and Style (F; 3) 

A review of English grammar onmodern principles, including 
constituent and generative analysis, with a view to their appli- 
cation in the writing of clear English prose. Samples of various 
genres of literary style will be read and used as models for com- 
position exercises. Lawrence G. /ones 

SI 307 Russian Drama (3) 

A close study of selected works in this genre from Fonvizin 
through Tolstoj, Chexov, Blok and Majakovskij to the modern 
theatre. The structure of the drama and the techniques of the 
romantic and the realist will be examined. Lectures and readings 
will be entirely in Russian. Irina Agushi 

SI 308 Dostoevskij and Tolstoj (3) 

A study and analysis of realism in the works of two of Russia's 
most influential writers. Readings and selected criticism. Con- 
ducted in Russian. Irina Agushi 

Michael B. Kreps 

SI 311 (En 527) General Linguistics (F; 3) 

An introduction to the history and techniques of the scientific 
study of language in its structures and operations: articulatory 
and acoustic phonology, morphological analysis, historical re- 
construction, and syntactic models. 
Offered annually Michael /. Connolly 

SI 312 The Indo-European Languages (S; 3) 

An introduction to the techniques for a comparative-historical 
study of the phonology, grammar and etymology of the classical 
Indo-European languages. Michael /. Connolly 

SI 314 Old Persian and Avestan (S; 3) 

The language of the Achemenid cuneiform inscriptions and the 
related earlier dialect of the Zoroastrian Zend-Avesta. 

Michael /. Connolly 

SI 316 Old Church Slavonic (F; 3) 

The origins and development of the Slavic languages; the lin- 
guistic structure of Old Church Slavonic and its relation to mod- 
ern Slavic languages illustrated through readings in Old Church 
Slavonic texts. 
Offered biennially Michael /. Connolly 

SI 317 Old Russian (F; 3) 

An intensive study of the grammar and philology of Old Russian 
and early East Slavic; readings in Russian readings in Russian 
secular and religious texts from the Kievan period through the 
seventeenth century; Russian Church Slavonic as a liturgical lan- 
guage. 
Offered biennially Michael }. Connolly 

SI 320 Pushkin and Gogol' (3) 

Close readings of the major works of Pushkin and Gogol' as well 
as related works of Lermontov. Individual literary techniques and 
styles are studied along with the background of Russian roman- 
ticism and the transition to Russian realism. Conducted in Rus- 
sian. Irina Agushi 

SI 321 Turgenev and his Contemporaries (3) 

The aesthetic and ideological values of Turgenev's works; Tur- 
genev's role in literary circles of the mid-19th century in Russia 
and abroad. Students also explore writings of the period (e.g. 
Goncharov and Ostrovskij) for their polemical and ideological 
content. Conducted in Russian. Irina Agushi 

SI 327 Sanskrit (S; 3) 

The grammar of the classical language of India, supplemented 
through reading selections from the classical literature and an 
introductory study of comparative Indo-Iranian linguistics. 

Michael J. Connolly 

SI 328 Classical Armenian (S; 3) 

A grammatical analysis of Armenian grabar, the classical literary 
language current from the fifth century A.D. Sample readings 



from the Classical Armenian scriptural, patristic, liturgical, and 
historical texts. Michael /. Connolly 

SI 332 The Russian Short Story (3) 

The development and structure of the Russian rasskaz and povest' 
from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries. Readings in 
Russian. Lawrence G. Jones 

SI 333 Introduction to the West Slavic Languages (S; 3) 

A grammatical and phonological study of a featured West Slavic 
language (either Czech, Polish or Slovak), structural sketches of 
the other West Slavic languages, inductive readings in West 
Slavic texts. 
Offered biennially Lawrence G. /ones 

SI 334 Introduction to the South Slavic Languages (S; 3) 

A grammatical and phonological study of a featured South Slavic 
language (either Serbo-Croatian, Bulgarian, Slovenian or Mace- 
donian), structural sketches of the other South Slavic languages, 
inductive readings in South Slavic texts. 
Offered biennially Lawrence G. /ones 

SI 341 The Study of Russian Literature (F; 3) 

A proseminar in critical and formal techniques for the analysis, 
researching and appreciation of literature; bibliography, use of 
reference works and periodicals; literature from the viewpoints 
of the authors, readers, and scholars. Readings in Russian. 

Irina Agushi 

SI 342 Seminar in Russian Poetry (3) 

Detailed study of the style, structure and thematic content of 
works from a selected group of Russian poets. Texts in Russian. 

Lawrence G. /ones 

SI 343 Old Irish (S; 3) 

A descriptive and historical examination of the linguistic features 
of Old Irish among the Celtic and Indo-European languages; the 
reading of Early Irish texts. Michael /. Connolly 

SI 344 Syntax and Semantics (S; 3) 

An introduction to the concepts and operations of modern trans- 
formational-generative grammar and related models. Theories of 
meaning. Michael /. Connolly 

SI 348 Chexov (3) 

A close reading in Russian of some of Chexov's major prose, along 
with a survey of the critical literature on his works and a brief 
study of the influence of his style on later Russian writers. 

Lawrence G. /ones 

SI 349 Advanced Russian Writing and Translation (S; 3) 

A study of the subtleties of Russian syntax, vocabulary and style 
through extensive analytic reading and through both imitative 
and original writing; the theory and practice of preparing refined 
translations both from and into Russian. 
Conducted in Russian. 

Offered annually. Irina Agushi 

Michael B. Kreps 

SI 350 Advanced Practicum in Spoken Russian (S; 3) 

Effective use of the spoken language, including an introduction 
to simultaneous interpreting and the monitoring and transcrip- 
tion of Russian speech; specialized vocabularies. 
Conducted in Russian. 

Offered annually. Irina Agushi 

Marina V. Kreps 

Other courses in the Department's repertory, offered on a non- 
periodic basis include: 

SI 011-012 Russian Practicum: Elementary I/II; SI 017 Arabic Lan- 
guage and Culture; SI 059 Readings from Russian Intellectual 
History. 

SI 206 Language, Society and Communication; SI 226 Readings 
in Russian Short Prose; SI 229 Specialized Readings in Russian 
Texts; SI 230 Russian Literature of the Fantastic; SI 231 Slavic 
Civilizations; SI 232 A Survey of Chinese Literature (in transla- 
tion). 



Arts and Sciences / 89 

SOCIOLOGY 



SI 234 The Polish Language; SI 235 Chekhov's Plays and Stories 
(in translation); SI 236 A Survey of Polish Literature; SI 237 
Sounds of Language and Music. 

SI 305 History of the Russian Language; SI 322 The Structure of 
Modern Russian; SI 335 Early Russian Literature; SI 336 Seminar 
in Soviet Literature; SI 337 Comparative Slavic Linguistics; SI 
338 Tolstoj & Solzhenicyn; SI 339 Semiotics and Structure; SI 
351 Topics in Linguistic Theory; SI 352 Russian Literary Humor 
and Satire. 

Information on these courses and their availability may be re- 
ceived from the Chairman. 

Research Courses 

The following tutorials and courses of reading and research are 
intended solely for students who have exhausted present course 
offerings or are doing thesis work on advanced topics. The precise 
subject matter and scheduling are determined by arrangement 
and such courses may be repeated for credit. 

SI 390 Advanced Tutorial: Russian Language (3) 

Irina Agushi 

Si 391 Advanced Tutorial: Russian Literature (3) 

Jrina Agushi 
Lawrence G. Jones 



SI 392 Advanced Tutorial: Linguistics (3) 



SI 393 Advanced Tutorial: Chinese (3) 



Michael J. Connolly 
Lawrence G. /ones 

Ting Yueh-hung 



Si 394 Advanced Tutorial: Slavic Linguistics (3) 

Lawrence G. Jones 
Michael J. Connolly 

SI 791 Russian Literature: Reading and Research (F, S; 3, 3) 

By arrangement Irina Agushi 

Lawrence G. Jones 

SI 792 Linguistics: Reading and Research (F, S; 3, 3) 

By arrangement Michael J. Connolly 

Lawrence G. Jones 

SI 794 Slavic Linguistics: Reading and Research (F, S; 3, 3) 

By arrangement Lawrence G. Jones 

Michael J. Connolly 



Sociology 



Faculty 

Visiting Professor Benedict S. Alper, A.B., Harvard University 
Professor Severyn T. Bruyn, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University of Illi- 



nois 



Professor John D. Donovan, A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

Professor Lynda Lytle Holmstrom, Chairperson of the Department 
B.A., Stanford University; A.M., Boston University; Ph.D., Bran- 
deis University 

Professor Ritchie P. Lowry, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University of Cali- 
fornia at Berkeley 

Visiting Professor Richard Quinney, B.S., Carroll College; M.S., 
Northwestern University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Professor David Horton Smith, A.B., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Paul S. Gray, A.B., Princeton; A.M., Stanford 
University; A.M., Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor Jeanne Guillemin, A.B., Harvard University; 
A.M., Ph.D., Brandeis University 

Associate Professor Sharlene J. Hesse-Biber, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 
University of Michigan 



Associate Professor David A. Karp, A.B., Harvard College; Ph.D., 
New York University 

Associate Professor Seymour Leventman, A.B., Washington State 
College, Chicago; A.M., Indiana University; Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota 

Associate Professor Michael A. Malec, B.S., Loyola University; 
M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 

Associate Professor Stephen J. Pfohl, B.A., Catholic University of 
America; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Associate Professor John B. Williamson, B.S., Massachussetts In- 
stitute of Technology; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Assistant Professor Paul G. Schervish, A.B., University of Detroit; 
A.M., Northwestern University; M.Div., Jesuit School of Theology 
at Berkeley; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Assistant Professor Eve Spangler, A.B., Brooklyn College; A.M., 
Yale University; M.L.S., Southern Connecticut State College; 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 



Program Description 

The undergraduate program in sociology is designed to satisfy 
the intellectual and career interests of students who are concerned 
about what is happening in their society and in their daily per- 
sonal interaction. The program prepares students for graduate 
study in sociology, social work, urban affairs, governmental 
administration, criminal justice, the law, industrial organization, 
education, etc. The sociological perspective in general and the 
technical knowledge and skills developed in the program con- 
tribute to personal growth and are useful in a broad range of 
occupations. 

The social science core requirement: This requirement may be 
filled by taking any courses numbered Sc 001-Sc 099; the themes 
of these courses are concerned with the many groups that the 
individual forms — families, tribes, communities, and states, and 
a great variety of social, religious, political, business and other 
organizations that have arisen out of living together. A course 
number Sc 100 or below is a prerequisite for all higher numbered 
courses. When this prerequisite has been satisfied, higher num- 
bered courses can fulfill the social science core requirement. 

Requirements for the major in sociology: 

1. Principles of Sociology, Sc 100, is the first required course 
and is a prerequisite for all upper level courses. NOTE: Intro- 
ductory Sociology (Sc 001) can also fulfill this requirement, al- 
though Principles is pre/erred. 

2. Statistics (Sc 200), Sociological Theory (Sc 215), and Meth- 
ods of Social Research (Sc 210); these may be taken concurrently 
with the six required electives. It is recommended that Statistics 
be taken before Methods of Social Research. 

3. Of the six electives, at least three must be Level HI (courses 
numbered 300-699). 



Course Offerings 



Core 

Sc 001 Introductory Sociology (F, S; 3) 

This is a core course in the Social Science area designed to pro- 
vide the student with sociological angles of vision and hearing 
and feeling as they pertain to his/her own life and the lives of 
others around them. Focusing on American society, the student 
will study and analyze the obvious and the not-so-obvious fea- 
tures of our changing social institutions and should acquire both 
new insights and new critical perspectives. The Department 

Sc 003 Introductory Anthropology (F, S; 3) 

An introduction to the field of anthropology, including physical 
and social anthropology, ethnography, and cross-cultural studies. 

Jeanne Guillemin 

Sc 022 Crime in America (F; 3) 

An introductory course in criminology which seeks for an un- 
derstanding of criminal behavior in today's society. Subjects cov- 



90 / Arts and Sciences 

SOCIOLOGY 



ered include: what crime is and what crimes are; the extent and 
cost of crime; theories of crime "causation;" the history and the- 
ories of punishment; victimology; crime prevention; the criminal 
justice process-police court, corrections, probation and parole. 

Benedict S. Alper 

Sc 030 Deviant Behavior (F, S; 3) 

An exploration of basic issues in social deviance and social con- 
trol. The development and control of deviant behavior, statuses 
and identities are examined in terms of the twin social processes 
of institutionalization and stratification. Major perspectives will 
be considered; mental illness, corporate and government crimes, 
drug use and alternate sexual life-styles will be 
discussed. Stephen /. Pfohl 

Sc 041 Race Relations (F, S; 3) 

An examination of race and ethnic relations in a mass society 
with emphasis on the minority community, systems of power and 
domination, racial and ethnic ideologies in relation to processes 
of social change. Seymour Leventman 

Sc 049 Social Problems (F; 3) 

This course systematically analyzes the nature of society as the 
totality of social relations of domination. The aim is to develop 
a critical understanding of the forces of social control that shape 
society and people's everyday lives. Three manifestations of the 
workings of relations of domination are stressed: 1) corporations; 
2) the workplace and employment; and 3) poverty and inequality. 
We will emphasize a political-economy perspective — that is, how 
the goal of profit-maximization of firms (the economic dimension) 
is the major influence in shaping the state (the political dimen- 
sion) and the way people think (the ideological dimension). 

Paul G. Schervish 

Sc 051 Power in Contemporary Society (F; 3) 

The types of power in contemporary society (force vs. authority); 
forms of power (charismatic, traditional, legal-bureaucratic); and 
changes (to knowledge and information manipulation). Ruling 
elites and ruling classes in contemporary society. Examples from 
political administrations, the CIA, the FBI, the military, local 
police, etc. Major problems and possible responses, including the 
erosion of legitimacy, pluralist counter-trends, the redistribution 
of wealth, groupthink and aggression, the role of the multinational 
corporation in developing nations, etc. Bitchie P. Lowry 

Sc 083 Alienation in American Society (S; 3) 

An examination of the concept of alienation; an examination of 
the theories of alienation. Utilizing varied theoretical perspec- 
tives, we will then examine particular conditions in modern in- 
dustrial society that have led to man/woman's estrangement and 
show some ways, both creative and destructive, in which men 
and women have responded to that estrangement. 

Sharlene /. Hesse-Biber 

Sc 097 Death and Dying (S; 3) 

An introduction to thanatology from a sociological perspective. 
Topics to be considered are: causes of death, the process of dying, 
euthanasia, the funeral industry, the hospice movement, bereave- 
ment, grief, mourning, the psychological autopsy, suicide, and 
the concept of social death. John B. Williamson 



Required for Majors 

Sc 100 Principles of Sociology (F; 3) 

This is an introductory sociology course designed for sociology 
majors. The goal of the course is to enable the student to think 
"sociologically": to think systematically and analytically about 
social behavior. To accomplish this, we will examine 1) the basic 
concepts and principles of sociology and b) a wide range of ex- 
amples of sociological analysis. The basic concepts and principles 
of sociology represent the tools of sociological analysis; thus, an 
examination of sociological analysis should provide insight into 
how these tools are employed. In the course we will concern 
ourselves with questions such as: How does the sociologist work 
and what are the uses of sociological findings? What are the so- 



ciological forces that shape our lives? What are the meaningful 
challenges America faces today? 

Sharlene /. Hesse-Biber 

Sc 200 Statistics (F; 3) 

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics 
include: measures of centrality and dispersion; association and 
correlation; probability and hypothesis testing. 

The course is taught using a "Personalized System of Instruc- 
tion." All of the work is done in tutorial groups of about ten 
students. However, tutors do not lecture. The primary responsi- 
bility for learning falls on the student; the tutor acts as a 
helper. Michael A. Malec 

Sc 210 Methods of Social Research (F, S; 3) 

This course is designed to acquaint students with the range of 
research methods used in sociological investigations and to eval- 
uate their strengths and weaknesses; to understand some of the 
basic problems involved in the collection and analysis of data 
and to provide a more in-depth treatment of field research tech- 
niques; and finally, to give students first-hand experience in car- 
rying out a research project. PauJ S. Gray 

David A. Karp 

Sc 215 Sociological Theory (F, S; 3) 

The development of theory from the beginning of the 19th century 
to the present. Seymour Leventman 

Eve Spongier 

Electives 

Sc 120 The Political, Economic and Ethical Dimensions of World 
Hunger (F; 3) 

A multidisciplinary analysis of the roots of world hunger and of 
proposals for alleviating the problem. An examination of the roots 
of hunger and poverty, the problems of developing nations, the 
role of developed nations, multinational corporations and hun- 
ger, the limits to growth, trade and food, and the role of foreign 
aid. Sr. Jeanne Gallo 

Sc 123 Juvenile Delinquency: Children in Trouble, Children in 
Court (S; 3) 

Topics to be covered include: the special attributes of youth; 
historic attitudes toward childhood and adolescence; the spec- 
ialized procedures of the juvenile court and corrections, with 
special reference to community modes of treatment. A visit will 
be arranged to a juvenile court session. Benedict S. Alper 

Sc 127 Childcare and Corrections I (F; 3) 

The course includes the theory of therapy used in the care of 
children, including the emotionally disturbed, classroom work, 
and at least 15 hours per week field experience and training in 
a children's treatment center. Close supervision will be given to 
a journal and to the field experience. Johan Westerkamp 

Sc 128 Childcare and Corrections II (S; 3) 

Continued exploration in therapeutical practices. Special atten- 
tion will be given to comparative treatment centers as well as 
case preparation for treatment conferences. Johan Westerkamp 

Sc 130 Deviant Social Action (F; 3) 

An introduction to collective deviance in human society — de- 
viant voluntary groups and social movements (e.g., Gay Libera- 
tion, Ex-drug addict groups, secret societies), social protest 
activities, mobs, riots, and revolutions. Why, where, when and 
how does collective deviance occur, who participates in it, and 
what effects does it have? David H. Smith 

Sc 134 Social Disruption: Coping and Surviving (F; 3) 

Combining an analytical and pragmatic approach, this course 
considers a variety of types of social disruptions and how people 
have dealt or could deal with them. The disruptions focused on 
will include natural and man-made disasters: major commodity 
shortages (e.g., the Arab oil embargo), conventional and thermo- 
nuclear warfare, terrorism, coups and military dictatorships, 
depression and inflation, and general societal breakdowns — not 
necessarily in this order. We will analyze the constraints placed 
on the individual and the larger social system, various strategies 
for coping, values that guide our behavior, and the probabilities 



Arts and Sciences / 91 

SOCIOLOGY 



of various social disruptions occurring in America in the near or 
distant future. David H. Smith 

Sc 135 Sociology of Nonviolence (F; 3) 

We will examine the political theory of nonviolent action, based 
on the case studies of Gene Sharp, and link it with a systematic 
review of the social movements based on the ethical principle of 
nonviolence. We will also study the sociological mechanisms of 
nonviolence and look in detail at the history of major figures in 
this field such as Mohandas K. Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Cesar 
Chavez, Perez Esquivel, Lanza del Vasto, Danilo Dolci, Dom Hel- 
dar Camara, Dorothy Day and others. Severyn T. Bruyn 

Sc 137 Population and Ecology (S; 3) 

A study of the problems related to the interrelationship between 
population processes and the physical and social environment; 
historical and present day trends in population growth with spe- 
cial emphasis on third world countries; international and internal 
migration; sex, race, and class differences in fertility and mor- 
tality. 

SharJene /. Hesse-Biber 

Sc 154 Sociology of Medicine (S; 3) 

The organization of medical care; the structure of the professions 
providing medical services (education and training, professional 
associations, competition between various professional groups); 
client-professional relationships, and the structure of hospitals 
and clinics. Robert Lavizzo-Mourey 

Sc 155 Sports in American Society (S; 3) 

By looking at sport from a sociological perspective we will see 
that it is more than fun and games; it shapes and reflects our 
values; it is becoming — and increasingly so — a big business; it 
supports and distorts our schools; it brings us together and it 
divides us from each other. We will look at all these topics and 
more. Michael A. Malec 

Sc 166 (Bk 252) The Structure of the Black Family (F; 3) 

An historical and sociological study of the African-American fam- 
ily in the United States, with comparative materials from the 
Caribbean and Africa, examining how slavery and urbanization 
have affected African-American families. Dibinga Wa Said 

Sc 171 Perspectives on Black Women (S; 3) 

We will examine the socio-economic condition of Black Women 
in America, in an historical format, tracing the effects of a de- 
veloping America upon the life-style and socio-economic posi- 
tion of black women today. The black woman will be examined 
as she moves through her life cycle with emphasis on the impact 
society is making on her and the impact she is making on society. 
Ongoing quantitative and qualitative data will be 
analyzed. Amanda Houston 

Sc 181 The Social Psychology of City Life (S; 3) 

An examination of the central images that have dominated social 
scientists' view of city life. The question that will guide our effort 
asks "How do persons give meaning to, adapt to, and make in- 
telligible their lives as city dwellers?" Special attention to gaps, 
omissions or deficiencies in traditional theoretical explanations 
and substantive features that have been relatively neglected in 
the literature on urbanism. David A. Karp 

Sc 184 Sociology of the Legal Profession (S; 3) 

This course in the area of the sociology of occupations/professions 
is of particular interest to students who are "thinking about" or 
are committed to law school and a legal career. Against a back- 
ground of some conceptual considerations regarding the profes- 
sions, the course studies the evolution of the legal profession in 
the United States. Special attention is then given to the social 
and psychological characteristics of those seeking admission to 
law schools, to the structure of legal education, to the academic 
and social processes involved in "making a lawyer" and to the 
selective processes that operate in the choice of a first job. At- 
tention is also given to the work cultures of different types of 
lawyering, to the changing structures of the legal profession, and 



to some of the current and developing problems confronted by 
American lawyers. John D. Donovan 

Sc 196 Aging and Society (F; 3) 

This course is an introduction to social gerontology with an em- 
phasis on the sociology of aging. Among the topics to be consid- 
ered are: age changes in personality and creativity, marriage and 
intergenerational family relationships, the politics of aging, work 
and retirement, crime, housing and living environments, the 
economics of aging, social services, and life in nursing homes. 

John B. Williamson 

Sc 225 (En 225) Introduction to Feminism (F, S; 3) 

A course taught by student-teams under faculty direction to ac- 
quaint students with a large range of academic and "life expe- 
rience" topics which have been affected by the Women's Studies 
scholarship. After a preliminary meeting the class divides into 
12—14 person seminars which meet once a week to discuss and 
study such issues as women's history, feminist theory, sex roles 
and socialization, gender and health, religion, work, literature 
and essays by and about women. The course emphasizes partic- 
ipation and collective work on projects. Judith Wilt 

Sc 250 (PI 259, Th 248) Perspectives on War, Aggression and 
Conflict Resolution (F; 3) 

An exploration from an interdisciplinary perspective of various 
alternatives to war, evaluated on the basis of both practical and 
ethical criteria. Topics include ethics of war and conflict, mutual 
deterrence, arms control and disarmament, economic conversion, 
world government, regionalism, and nonviolent resistance. 

Rein A. Uritam 

Sc 251 (PI 269, Th 250) Perspectives on War, Aggression and 
Conflict Resolution (S; 3) Rein A. Uritam 

Sc 278 (Bk 278) The American Labor Movement and the Black 
Worker (F; 3) 

This course will examine the intricate relationship between Black 
workers and the organized labor movement, the love-hate affili- 
ation between labor unions and civil rights organizations, on the 
one hand, and their unity of purpose on the other; the successes 
and failures encountered. 

Issues covered will include the development of separate Black 
labor movements, the use of Black workers as strike breakers, 
President Roosevelt's Executive Order 8802 in June 1941, and the 
present involvement of Blacks in the new municipal and white 
collar unions. In-depth attention will be given to the opposing 
philosophies of Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. DuBois, and 
the resulting impact upon the Black worker in America. 

Amanda Houston 

Sc 299 Reading and Research (F, S; 3) 

Independent research on a topic mutually agreed upon by the 
student and professor. Professor's written consent must be ob- 
tained prior to registration. This is not a classroom course. 

The Department 

Sc 323 White Collar Crime: Crimes of Organized Groups (S; 3) 

White collar crime, the crimes of government, politics, business, 
the military and "organized crime." The case method will be used 
throughout the course, based on assigned readings. 

Benedict S. Alper 

Sc 324 New Directions in Criminology (S; 3) 

The sociological study of crime is developing in new directions, 
responding to the interdisciplinary questions that are being raised 
in the social sciences. We will propose and investigate possible 
directions, including neo-Marxist social theory, critically reflec- 
tive sociology, literary sensibility, and naturalist-ecological the- 
ory. The various theoretical approaches will be applied to specific 
problems of crime. Richard Quinney 

Sc 326 Crime in Literature (F; 3) 

The course is jointly offered by the Sociology and English De- 
partments. We will explore the sociological and literary impli- 
cations of criminal behavior from Cain to Capote. Students are 



92 / Arts and Sciences 

SOCIOLOGY 



required to read each week the classic work under 
review. Benedict S. AJper 

Sc 327 Childcare Supervision I (F; 3) 

The course aims to develop theory, methodology and analysis of 
supervising attitudes and procedures in the childcare and cor- 
rective field. Designed for those who have taken Sc 127 and Sc 
128, the course is also open to students who have equivalent 
backgrounds. Johan Westerkamp 

Sc 328 Childcare Supervision II (S; 3) Johan Westerkamp 

Sc 330 Deviance and Social Control (F; 3) 

An advanced study of deviance and social control; a critical re- 
view of major theoretical and research frameworks; an exami- 
nation of the process of "becoming deviant" and a discussion of 
current strategies of social control. Stephen /. Pfohl 

Sc 333 Crime and Social Justice (F; 3) 

Rooted in the prophetic religious tradition is the urge toward 
justice in human affairs. While the human struggle is necessarily 
temporal and in this world, the expectant goal is transhistorical 
and eternal. The objective of this course is to restore the prophetic 
concept of social justice to an understanding of crime in contem- 
porary society. The prophetic meaning of justice will be con- 
trasted with the conventional and legalistic notions of justice. 
The prophetic sense of social justice will be applied to an analysis 
and critique of the phenomena associated with crime, including 
criminal behavior, law enforcement, the judicial system, punish- 
ment and prisons, and corrections. Prophetic justice is the ideal 
that integrates crime with the historical aim of social justice, 
challenging us to think and act in ways that will change the 
existing human condition. Richard Quinney 

Sc 363 Women at Work (F; 3) 

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of 
economic participation by women, past and present: the issues 
arising from women's increased participation in the labor force; 
the scope of paid and unpaid work performed by women through- 
out history; the concept of "work" and its unique application to 
women; minority women, blue collar women, white collar work- 
ers, housewives, and the particular problems each has faced; the 
dual career family and its implications for the future organization 
of the economic sphere to accommodate the needs of working 
couples. The format of the course will be lectures, class discus- 
sions, films and guest speakers. The enrollment of men in the 
course has resulted in open and lively discussions of various 
contemporary issues. Sharlene /. Hesse-Biber 

Sc 378 Introduction to Social Work (F, S; 3) 

A broad survey of the field of social work, starting with a brief 
discussion of human behavior. We then deal with individuals, 
groups and communities. In addition to a consideration of social 
work methodology, we will examine the historical roots, value 
foundations and modi operandi of the settings in which social 
work is practiced. Dwight S. Adams 

Albert F. HanwelJ 



Sc 399 Scholar of the College (F, S; 3, 3) 



The Department 



Sc 422 Topics and Issues in Criminology (F, S; 3) 

By arrangement with instructor. Benedict S. AJper 

Sc 441 Comparative Health Systems: France, West Germany, and 
the U.S. (S; 3) 

Prerequisite; Rl 052 or equivalent and permission of The Immer- 
sion Program 

The course begins with a comparative history of the development 
of government supported health programs in France, West Ger- 
many, and the United States from the 1930s to the present. Five 
categories of information about health and medical care in these 
three nations are presented and analyzed, with selective reference 
to data from England, Norway, The Netherlands and East Ger- 
many. Jeanne Guillemin 

Sc 472 Social Stratification: Inequality in America (S; 3) 

A survey of inequality in America. The major focus will be on 
class stratification: that system of inequality which is rooted in 
the organization of the economy and the differentiation of the 
occupational structure. Topics covered include: the relationship 



between the owners of capital and the government, the role of 
education in the aspiration of middle class people, changes in 
the occupational structure as these create or foreclose opportun- 
ities for working class people to advance and the debate about 
the nature of poverty in America. Eve Spongier 

Sc 491 Modernization and Development (S; 3) 

The course presents several theories of social, political, and eco- 
nomic development in the context of explaining events in Asia, 
Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the. part played 
by emerging institutions: parties, bureaucracies, trade unions, 
armies — in meeting the challenges of dependency and modern- 
ization. Paul S. Gray 

Sc 495 Ireland: Society in Transition (S; 3) 

A case study of the processes, prospects, and problems that ac- 
company modernization. Ireland is somewhat unique in this con- 
text because it is not the usual Third World nation experiencing 
modernization. Rather, it is a "late bloomer" surrounded by al- 
ready modernized nations. The Irish case is analyzed against a 
necessarily brief historical sketch of 19th and early 20th century 
developments. More detailed attention is given to the investiga- 
tion of the structures and significance of more recent change in 
the demographic, political, and economic, educational, and re- 
ligious institutions. The reality and the importance of the North- 
ern Ireland-Republic of Ireland situation is briefly acknowledged. 

John D. Donovan 

Sc 511 Fieldwork Methods (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course in the theory and practice of fieldwork is the first 
semester in a year-long sequence. During this term you are asked 
to: learn something about the history and tradition of field work; 
read examples of field studies and how others have done them; 
develop and sharpen your observation and analytic skills; com- 
plete three fieldwork exercises and keep a journal; share your 
experiences with other students; plan a project of your own in 
a local setting. The second semester will involve primarily, the 
carrying out of your own research in the setting you have selected. 
Participation in the second semester is not required, except for 
those enrolled in the department's fieldwork specialization. 

Jeanne Guillemin 

Sc 512 Computer Applications: An Introduction to the Use of the 
Computer for Data Handling (F; 3) 

Modern computer technology and contemporary social science 
research make the handling of large data bases both possible and 
necessary. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students 
with the use of the computer for data handling. It seeks to impart 
an understanding of the ways in which a computer can be used 
to store and prepare data for analysis. This course, therefore, is 
preliminary to statistical data analysis and should not be confused 
with it. The emphasis here is the logic of data manipulation rather 
than on the nature of computer hardware and software or on 
learning how to write original computer programs. Rather, a va- 
riety of prepared computer packages will be taught (including 
SPSS and SCSS) as a means for data handling. 

Paul G. Schervish 

Sc 513 Evaluation Research (S; 3) 

A pragmatic and analytic overview of how evaluation is done, 
whether of projects, programs, or whole agencies and organiza- 
tions. It assumes a knowledge of social science methodology and 
statistics to some significant degree (at least one course in social 
science research methods and in statistics, preferably at the grad- 
uate level). We will focus on the use of various research ap- 
proaches in evaluation, the role of evaluation, metaevaluation, 
and other issues. David H. Smith 

Sc 518 Seminar in Symbolic Interaction (S; 3) 

Students will read and discuss selected works of writers working 
broadly within a symbolic interactionist frame of reference. At- 
tention will be given to the development of symbolic interac- 
tionist thought especially, but the general concern of the seminar 
will be on "conceptions of interaction and forms of sociological 
explanation." Writers to be discussed might include: Blumer, 
Garfinkel, Goffman, Mead, Weber, etc. David A. Karp 

Sc 529 Sociology of the Family and Sex Roles (S; 3) 

An analysis of the sociological theories and research dealing with 
the family with particular attention to its relation to the broader 



Arts and Sciences / 93 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE 



society and the internal dynamics. Considerable emphasis on the 
interconnections between these aspects and changing sex roles. 

The Department 

Sc 530 Issues in Social Control (S; 3) 

An exploration of basic theoretical, research and policy issues 
related to the informal and formal social control of behaviors, 
ideas and lifestyles. Emphasis will be on the implications of var- 
ious efforts to socialize persons to conform to the dominant real- 
ities of existing political-economic orders and attempts to "re- 
form" deviant groups and individuals through punishment, ther- 
apy and exclusion. Specific attention will be given to the social- 
history of "institutionalization" as a means of controlling social 
deviants. Stephen /. Pfohl 

Sc 549 Social Problems Theory and Social Policy (F; 3) 

Starting with the assumption that most previous social programs 
have failed for a variety of reasons, this seminar will explore the 
reasons for failure and possible alternative responses. For ex- 
ample, existing social theory may be inadequate or lacking. Social 
programs may become politicized. Special programs may create 
greater problems than those which they were designed to resolve. 
Are there new, more democratic, and responsive ways of building 
social policy in order to assist people to cope with and respond 
to the problems influencing them? The seminar will share ex- 
periences and views concerning these issues. 

Ritchie P. Lowry 

Sc 550 Important Readings In Sociology (S; 3) 

Members of the seminar will read and discuss a number of books 
generally considered significant in the development of sociology. 
Throughout the semester discussion will center on the charac- 
teristics of these important researches. A consideration of the 
relationship between method, theory and analysis. Each work 
will be analyzed in terms of its general contribution to sociology 
and its place within the development of particular areas. 

Eve Spongier 



Sc 555 Senior Honors Seminar (F; 3) 



Sharlene /. Hesse-Biber 



Sc 556 Senior Honors Thesis (S; 3) or (S; 6) 



By Arrangement 



Sc 566 Introduction to Organizational Democracy I (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Social Economy and Social Policy 
graduate program or permission of instructor. 
A core course in the Social Economy and Social Policy program. 
In the first semester of the two semester course, we will examine 
the normal form of contemporary organization — bureaucracy — 
and then the various participatory alternatives: joint labor-man- 
agement committees; "quality of workplace" projects; worker- 
owned companies; communitarian settlements and national par- 
ticipatory economies. The class is organized to maximize partic- 
ipation by all students. The Department 

Sc 566 Advanced Organizational Democracy II: Theory and 
Research (S; 3) 

An in-depth look at selected topics in organizational democracy, 
with particular attention to research in the frontier of these issues; 
the relationship between ownership and control; conditions that 
sustain or undermine organizational democracy; varieties of work 
reform; comparison of domestic to international cases; constraints 
of the environment on self-managed enterprises; prospects for the 
development of a cooperative sector. 

The Department 

Sc 574 American Culture and Social Structure (F; 3) 

An examination of America as a mass culture and society; its 
institutions, cultural values and norms, and national character 
including its heroes, deviants, and basic personality types. Spe- 
cial emphasis is given to social change and the Vietnam decade. 

Seymour Leventman 

Sc 582 The Transition to Socialism (S; 3) 

The purpose of this course is to review the major theoretical and 
conceptual issues of the transition from capitalism to socialism. 
It does so within the neo-Marxist framework. While based on the 
fundamental insights of Marx, the neo- or critical-Marx perspec- 



tive incorporates both the historical developments in capitalism 
and socialism since Marx's time and the theoretical debates with 
nondogmatic Marxist theory. In the first part of the course we 
will study a range of theoretical and conceptual issues and in the 
second part we will explore a number of concrete historical in- 
stances of the transition to socialism (e.g., the Soviet Union, Swe- 
den, and Cuba). Paul G. Schervish 

Sc 583 Evolution of Consciousness (S; 3) 

The evolution of consciousness is observed from the standpoint 
of different disciplines, from physics to poetry as well as soci- 
ology. We will explore different modes of knowing such as in- 
tuition, cognition, perception and inner experience and examine 
the empirical foundations and social significance of such phe- 
nomena as telepathy, astral projection, clairvoyance, hypnosis, 
psychokinesis and psychic healing. Severyn T. Bruyn 

Sc 597 Work and Personality in the Middle Years (F; 3) 

This elective course describes and analyzes the distinctive, but 
largely unrecognized, social and psychological processes that 
characterize what is generally defined as the "middle years" of 
the life cycle. The changes in life situations experienced during 
these years, their meanings in terms of personal identity, family 
and work, the relevance of the cohort effect (the historical timing 
of their earlier life experiences) on the lives of middle-years sub- 
groups; these and other related topics and their variations by race, 
sex, and culture are examined. John D. Donovan 

Sc 665 Sociology of Law: Law and the Labor Process (F; 3) 

This course is designed to be a survey of the American justice 
system from the point of view of both the people who work within 
it and the larger society. Topics discussed are: the origins of legal 
institutions, the relationship between different types of societies 
and different types of legal systems, the usefulness of legal in- 
stitutions for promoting social change. In particular, this course 
stresses that the justice system is what the people who work 
within it make of it. Therefore there is considerable emphasis on 
a study of the occupations which comprise the legal system: leg- 
islators, judges, lawyers, policemen, prison guards, probation and 
parole officers, prison cbaplains, forensic psychiatrists, etc. 

Eve Spongier 

Sc 666 Economy and Society (S; 3) 

An examination of the relationship between the structure of so- 
ciety and the nature of the economic system. Particular attention 
wil be given to an analysis of the economic and class dynamics 
in American society and alternative forms of social organization 
to carry out economic activities. Severyn T. Bruyn 

Sc 670 (Mc 670) (PI 670) Technology and Culture (S; 3) 

This course examines the philosophical, psychological, social, 
scientific and economic sources, impact and direction of modern 
technology, focusing upon the effects on the individual, society 
in general and on organizations. Students should expect to raise 
and analyze significant issues in these areas. An elementary un- 
derstanding of some aspect of applied modern technology (e.g., 
computers, nuclear energy, artificial intelligence, mass commu- 
nications, etc.), and an interest in where society is, and is going, 
by virtue of this burgeoning technology is a prerequisite. 

William Griffith 



Speech Communication 
and Theatre 



Faculty 

Professor John Henry Lawton. A.B., Emerson College; A.M., Boston 
College; Ph.D., State University of Iowa 

Associate Professor Donald Fishman, Chairman of the Department 
B.A., University of Minnesota; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern Uni- 
versity 

Associate Professor Joseph M. Larkin, S.J., A.B., Boston College; 
A.M., Catholic University of America; S.T.B., Weston College 



94 / Arts and Sciences 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE 



Associate Professor J. Paul Marcoux, Assistant Chairman of De- 
partment 

B.S., Fitchburg State College; M.Ed., Boston University; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University 

Associate Professor Marilyn J. Matelski, A.B., Michigan State 
University; A.M., Ph.D., University of Colorado 

Associate Professor Dorman Picklesimer, Jr., A.B., Morehead State 
University; A.M., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., Indiana 
University 

Adjunct Associate Professor Daniel M. Rohrer, Director of Forensics 
A.B., Western Michigan University; A.M., University of Wiscon- 
sin; J.D. Boston College 

Assistant Professor Howard C. Enoch, A.B., University of Kentucky; 
M.F.A., Boston University 

Assistant Professor Linda Rosen, B.S., Northwestern University; 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Instructor Donald L. Hurwitz, A.B., Sarah Lawrence College; Ph.D. 
(cand.) University of Illinois 

Lecturer Gail Ann McGrath, A.B., Heidelberg University; A.M., 
Bowling Green State University 



Program Description 

The Department of Speech Communication and Theatre offers 
major programs for undergraduates in three main areas: Com- 
munication Studies, Theatre Arts, and Speech-Language Pathol- 
ogy and Audiology. 

Majors in Communication Studies must complete eleven 
courses (33 hours) in their program of study. Sa 101 Formal 
Speaking in Public, and Sa 105 Man and Communication are 
required for all students. Majors are expected to complete the 
remaining nine courses in the four major areas of the curriculum: 
(1) Personal Development, (2) Theory, (3) Mass Media Production, 
(4) Media Criticism. Qualified students are encouraged to assume 
partial internships at radio and television stations, or at maga- 
zines, newspapers, and advertising and public relations agencies. 
The internship program is open to all students who have achieved 
a cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or better, and who have 
completed the proper course work. Qualified majors usually be- 
gin their internships in the second semester of their junior year. 

The theatre program in the Department is designed to introduce 
students to a wide range of knowledge associated with acting, 
directing, set design, and the theory, history, and criticism of the 
theatre. Majors are required to complete ten courses (30 hours) 
including: Sa 141, Sa 143, Sa 144, Sa 145, Sa 146, Sa 302, Sa 306, 
and Sa 556. Theatre majors are usually actively involved in the 
Boston College Dramatics Society, an organization which serves 
as the production arm of the university theatre. Participation in 
the Dramatics Society as members of the cast, crew, and staff is 
expected of all theatre majors. 

It should be noted that only certain theatre courses may be used 
to meet University core curriculum requirements in the human- 
ities. These are: Sa 140, Sa 141, Sa 145, Sa 146, Sa 147. Consul- 
tation with Department Faculty is recommended regarding these 
and related matters. 

The Department also offers a course sequence in Speech- 
Language Pathology and Audiology. The sequence begins with 
Sa 171 Introduction to Speech-Language Pathology and Audiol- 
ogy and culminates with a clinical practicum for students in 
either the College of Arts and Sciences or the School of Education. 
This sequence is an approved concentration for majors in Biology, 
English, Linguistics, Psychology, Spanish, and Speech Commu- 
nication. It is also a concentration for students in the School of 
Education who are majoring in Elementary Education, Elemen- 
tary/Special Education, and Human Development. Students in- 
terested in pursuing this course should consult academic advisors 
within their major departments and Dr. Linda Rosen. This pro- 
gram is a graduate school preparatory curriculum. 



Course Offerings 

Speech Communication 

Basic Theory and Performance Courses 

Sa 099 Introduction to Communication (F; 3) 

This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the four 
main divisions in communication studies. Attention will be de- 
voted to pivotal concepts in oral communication and the practical 
application of theoretical concepts. This is a performance as well 
as theory course. Open to freshmen only. The Department 

Sa 101 Formal Speaking in Public (F, S; 3) 

Concentration on the effective preparation and delivery of such 
classical speech types as expository, occasional, persuasive and 
argumentative addresses. Attention is given to various modes of 
speaking, including extemporaneous, impromptu and manu- 
script methods. A considerable use is made of recordings, so that 
students may evaluate their own progress. This course is required 
for all communication majors. The Department 

Sa 103 Influence and Action: Elements of Persuasion (S; 3) 

How and why audiences are persuaded to accept a speaker's 
viewpoint with experience in applying principles to classroom 
speaking situations. Donald Fishman 

Sa 104 Interpersonal Communication (F, S; 3) 

This course is based upon the premise that most of the com- 
munication in which people engage is interpersonal rather than 
public. It relates more closely to the day-to-day communication 
needs of contemporary society. Student participation in this 
course ranges from dyadic (one to one) communications to formal 
situations. The course is divided into three sections: (1) know 
self, (2) know others, and (3) know the message. Both verbal and 
non-verbal communication techniques stressed. 

Dorman Picklesimer, Jr. 

Sa 105 Man and Communication (F, S; 3) 

A historical survey of communication theories and practices in 
Western cultures up to the Twentieth Century. This course is 
required for all communication majors. Donald Fishman 

Sa 107 Voice and Articulation for the Electronic Media 

(F, S; 3) 

Especially designed for students who wish to handle scripts ef- 
fectively in radio and television performance, this course focuses 
upon a variety of news reports, public interest announcements 
and commercials which provide class members with practical 
experience in reading aloud. Attention will be given as well to 
clear articulation and pronunciation which observes the General 
American standard. In this process students who have problems 
with local accents and sloppy articulation (undesirable for profes- 
sionals in the electronic media) receive personal attention from 
their professor and are encouraged to develop acceptable speech 
performance. Students, including communication majors, who 
are confronted with problems in these areas are urged to elect 
this course and deal with their difficulties meaningfully. 

Gail-Anne McGrath 

Advanced Courses 

Sa 202 Persuasive Speaking in Conference and Committee (F; 3) 

This course is concerned with developing the skills of the student 
advocate who seeks a future in business and industrial manage- 
ment, public service or the law. The class opens with a concen- 
tration on the preparation of a persuasive message which calls 
for a change in policy or procedure within a corporate division, 
business department or in local, state or national legislature. Ap- 
propriate language, organization and the several facets of per- 
suasive argumentation are studied. Time is given to analyzing the 
audience in a boardroom, a departmental meeting and decision- 
making committee, and the process of adapting the message to 
a specific audience is studied. In a series of speeches, gradually 
increasing in length, students will work to improve their delivery 
and will make use of videotape in the process. In the final meet- 
ings of the class students will present longer speeches. This 
course is for non-majors only. John Lawton 



Arts and Sciences / 95 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE 



Sa 206 Group Dynamics (S; 3) 

This course concentrates on the problem-solving process using 
the group discussion method. While both sociological and psy- 
chological aspects are considered, the emphasis in the course is 
on group and interpersonal communication techniques. Attention 
is given to participation and leadership in problem-solving and 
policy making discussions. Dorman Picklesimer, Jr. 

Sa 212 Freedom of Speech, Press and Association (S; 3) 

Students will survey limitations on free expression which are 
operative in American society, and consider the historical, phil- 
osophical and legal background of such limitations. Attention is ' 
focused on the free speech theories which have emerged in the 
20th century decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. During these 
years of political disputes and economic crisis, the individual's 
freedom of expression in the public forum will be investigated. 
The course will concentrate on political dissent and human rights 
in the US and abroad, free press, fair trial and whether TV cameras 
and newsmen should appear in courtroom trials, shield laws and 
newsmen's privileged protection of confidential sources of in- 
formation, executive and legislative immunity and secrecy in all 
branches of government, and the policy implications of the con- 
flict between the Privacy Act and the Freedom of Information 
Act. Attention will also be given to public access to the media, 
equal time, free time and the fairness doctrine, defamation of 
character, and invasion of privacy with an emphasis on adver- 
tising law in these areas. Reading of two major textbooks and 
extensive class handouts will be required. Daniel M. Rohrer 

Sa 213 Media Law (F; 3) 

This course will examine the constitutional and regulatory frame- 
work controlling the electronic media. Emphasis will be placed 
on the philosophical premises underlying the system of freedom 
of expression as well as the current operational difficulties. At- 
tention will be focused on topics dealing with (1) legal protection 
in broadcasting news and opinion (2) the right of access to the 
media (3) standards for judging the public interest (4) cable tel- 
evision. Completion of Sa 212 or consent of the instructor is 
required. Donald Fishman 

Sa 214 Campaign Rhetoric (F; 3) 

This course is taught in the fall of each election year. It involves 
studies in the rhetoric used by presidential and congressional 
aspirants. It considers the making of issues, the developing of 
issues, rhetorical strategy and tactics in election speech-making, 
and the meeting and avoiding of issues. Daniel M. Rohrer 

Sa 216 The Reporter and the Law (F; 3) 

This course involves a consideration of the day-to-day techniques 
of news reporting of the courts which provide an important ex- 
planation of the key differences between the professions of jour- 
nalism and the law. It describes basic approaches to legal 
reporting in general and analyzes the special legal risks that con- 
front the reporter on the court house beat and in the investigation 
of crime related stories. Daniel M. Rohrer 

The Mass Communication Media 

Sa 320 Mass Media: Survey in the 20th Century (S; 3) 

This survey course will examine the nature, scope, and function 
of the mass media in America. Attention will be placed on both 
print and the electronic media and an attempt will be made to 
formulate rhetorical interpretations about the impact of the media 
on various segments of American life. Special emphasis will be 
given to the development of an access principle, a reassessment 
of the fairness doctrine, and recent license renewal challenges. 
Consideration will also be given to the broader themes that are 
raised by transformations in the media during the 1980s. 

Marilyn Matelski 

Sa 321 Radio: An Introductory Course (F, S; 3) 

Areas to be studied include: history of radio, the Federal Com- 
munications Commission, broadcast law, radio station operation 
and radio programming. Practical experiences center on audio 
production and performance, newswriting, and commercial writ- 
ing. Marilyn Matelski 

Sa 322 Television: An Introductory Course (F, S; 3) 

Areas to be studied include: history of television, the Federal 
Communications Commission, broadcast law, television station 



operation and television programming. An important part of the 
course is television production and performance. 

Donald Hurwitz 
Marilyn Matelski 

Sa 323 Introduction to Journalism (F, S; 3) 

In a general survey course on how to read and write for news- 
papers and magazines, we will be focusing most of our attention 
on the Boston media. Students will learn how articles and pub- 
lications are put together, how orders of priorities are decided, 
how writing styles can be improved. Learning how to read crit- 
ically is a byproduct of this course. Students will be required to 
write an interview story, a news feature, an on-the-spot feature, 
a column or review, and a final in-depth report. Leaving campus 
to pursue stories will be a necessity. Students will also be ex- 
pected to keep abreast of the world's day-to-day news and 
events. Maureen Goss 

Laurence Barton 

Sa 324 Introduction to Public Relations (F, S; 3) 

This introduction to the field treats its definition and concepts 
as well as its historical development and its ethical and legal 
factors. Relationships between public relations, publicity, and 
the mass media receive attention. Emphasis is placed on audience 
analysis and on such essential public relations devices as the 
interview, press conferences, newspaper features, profiles and 
special articles. Client preparation for the televised talk show is 
also considered. Laurence Barton 

Sa 329 Special Program Concepts in the Electronic Media, The 
Interview, The Talk Show and Political Speaking (F; 3) 

Firstly this class is concerned with the techniques of radio and 
television interviewing. Next attention is centered on the talk 
show concept and various program types are analyzed. Several 
talk show hosts in the Greater Boston area will discuss major 
problems which have confronted them, and the solutions which 
they employed. Special attention is given to the techniques of 
handling an audience-participation talk show. 

During the final weeks of the course class members will study 
effective political speaking on radio and television and reconsider 
the techniques of such persuasive media performers as Franklin 
D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy and Senator Wayne Morse (Ore- 
gon). In addition to this study of models students may prepare 
and video tape their own persuasive speaking. 

As the course ends all students will submit a documented essay 
on a topic approved by the professor. John H. Lawton 

Sa 330 Radio and Television Workshop (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 329 Talk Show (no exceptions) 
In this class students are concerned entirely with the preparation 
of radio and television programs for stations in the Greater Boston 
area, in Eastern Massachusetts, and (in some instances) at Port- 
land, Maine and Providence, Rhode Island. By permission of the 
professor only. John H. Lawton 

Sa 332 Broadcast Writing (F, S; 3) 

Writing of various types of materials for broadcast use. The course 
will emphasize those skills necessary for entry level positions 
which require writing skills. Types of continuity to be studied 
will be news, commercial copy, and dramatic writing for both 
radio and television. The role of the writer in a production will 
also be discussed. Marilyn Matelski 

Sa 333 The Television Documentary (F; 3) 

This course explores the past 25 years of documentaries, news 
specials and investigative reports on television. As we view in 
class several examples from the vaults of CBS, NBC, ABC and the 
public broadcasting network, we will be concentrating on three 
areas: the changing history of style and content in TV documen- 
taries, a survey of the process of the making of a TV documentary, 
and the art of analyzing and critiquing a TV documentary. Written 
reviews will be required. We will also be examining the genesis 
of one independently-made film in a guest lecture. 

The Department 

Sa 334 The American Film: Influencing Action in the Business and 
Political Communities (F; 3) 

This course is concerned with the role of films in shaping public 
opinion and influencing decision making. Students will view and 
analyze moving pictures released by agencies in the Federal 
government with a view toward arousing sympathetic public re- 



96 / Arts and Sciences 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE 



sponse. Various documentaries circulated by Departments of the 
Interior, Defense and Health, Education and Welfare will be given 
special attention. Network documentaries such as "The Secret 
War" and "Hunger in America" will also be shown and discussed. 
Attention will be given as well to advertising and documentaries 
released by business concerns. Thus, the thrust of the course is 
to broaden student understanding of the cinema as a significant 
agency in influencing public opinion. John H. Lawton 

Marilyn Matelski 

Sa 338 Public Affairs and International Reporting (F, S; 3) 

This course is designed to examine techniques of newsgathering 
used by reporters dealing with domestic and international issues. 
Among the topics covered in the course are: (a) Access to records 
and documents in the executive, legislative, and judicial branches 
of government: (b) Willing and unwilling sources; (c) The Sun- 
shine Act and Open-Record Meeting; (d) Wireservice materials; 
(e) Reporting international news. This is primarily a lecture/dis- 
cussion course, and students are not required to have completed 
any other journalism courses before enrolling in Public Affairs 
and International Reporting. Laurence Barton 

Sa 339 Advertising Law (F; 3) 

This course concentrates on the legal and regulatory framework 
within which the field of advertising attempts to function. It in- 
cludes four units entitled: (1) How to Incorporate an Advertising 
Agency, (2) Warranties and Deceptive Advertising, (3) False and 
Deceptive Advertising, and (4) Commercial Speech. The first unit 
discusses the legal apparatus involved in establishing and main- 
taining an advertising agency. The second unit addresses the 
problem of contractual and tort liability in advertising, and sug- 
gests that warranties limit rather than create liability on the part 
of the industry. Unit three considers both federal and state reg- 
ulations in advertising, and investigates the question of puffery 
in advertising. The fourth unit ties together a wide range of ad- 
vertising issues which have emerged in the 1980's. They include 
the regulation of prescription drug prices, legal fees for services, 
and the question of distributing handbills. The question of 
whether corporations should be permitted to finance the adver- 
tising and promotion of political issues bridges the gap between 
commercial and political speech, as does the controversy over 
whether sex and violence on television should be curtailed. Race 
and sex discrimination in advertising is considered, as are the 
interests of Action for Children's Television and the question of 
whether media conglomerates should be dispersed. 

Daniel Rohrer 

Sa 345 Social Aspects of Mass Communication (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 105, Sa 322 or advanced undergraduate standing 
and permission of the instructor. 

This course assesses the impact of the electronic media on Amer- 
ican institutions, habits of thought, and styles of life. Topics to 
be considered include: the role of the mass media in creating a 
mass society; the debate concerning the effects of television; the 
sociology of media professionals; and new communications tech- 
nologies and the American future. Donald Hurwitz 

Sa 346 Broadcasting and Its Audience (S; 3) 

What are the mechanisms and standards of judgement that can 
be applied to guide and evaluate the broadcast industry in its 
mission? This course will examine three perspectives on those 
who receive the messages of mass media: market, public, and 
audience. After exploring the background and development of 
these conceptions, we will go on to consider the varieties of social 
sciences-program and audience measurement, ascertainment 
surveys, etc. -growing out of them and adopted by the broad- 
casting community. We will then examine the criticisms made 
of these forms of research by the industry, citizen groups, and the 
popular press. The course will culminate in an evaluation of the 
whole: the audience standard that has evolved, and the mecha- 
nisms of commercial social research that support it. 

Donald Hurwitz 

Sa 348 Broadcast Programming (S; 3) 

This course will examine programming strategies in radio and 
television. The focus of the course is on developing media strat- 
egies to capture a particular segment of the mass audience, and 
the course will analyze competitive scheduling techniques, spe- 



cial vs. regular series programming, network-affiliate relation- 
ships, and the influence of broadcast advertising on program- 
ming. /. MacDonald 

Sa 440 Introduction to Advertising (F, S; 3) 

This course explores both the structure and the processes of na- 
tional consumer advertising in modern day America. Topics stud- 
ied include: the organization of the advertising agency and its 
relationship with a client, the determination of an advertising 
budget, research for advertising and the marketing orientation, 
and the creative uses of the various advertising media. In addition 
to lectures, discussions and guest speakers, students will partic- 
ipate in the formulation of an advertising campaign plan. 

Donald Hurwitz 

Sa 442 Commercial Writing: The Print Media (S;3) 

Prerequisite: Ability to write. 

This course focuses on how to bring salesmanship into your writ- 
ing style, how to market specific commodities, how to persuade 
an audience or certain consumers to accept your product and 
your personality. We will concern ourselves with the field of 
advertising copyrighting and the general idea of public relations 
and promotions. This is all directed to the print media only and 
not radio or TV. Laurence Barton 

Sa 446 Photo Journalism (F; 3) 

This course is concerned with the essentiality of photography in 
creating a meaningful and attention winning news story. Students 
in this course are required to do field work of an increasingly 
challenging nature, and are evaluated on their skill in incorpo- 
rating film and narrative in one story. The Department 

Sa 447 Commercial Time Sales in the Local Market (S; 3) 

This course is concerned with the sales of commercial time to 
business concerns, manufacturers and other agencies in the local 
market. The professor will concern himself with the analysis of 
the market, various types of commercials available and the adapt- 
ing of such commercials to the needs of prospective advertisers. 
Department majors requesting this course should have com- 
pleted Sa 322, and Sa 440. Douglas Tanger 

Sa 448 Broadcast Mangement (S; 3) 

Management techniques and the relationship of management to 
station personnel are analyzed in this particular course. A de- 
partment faculty member handles class work; however, several 
TV and radio station managers present lectures in pertinent areas. 

Donald Fishman 

Advanced Course Work in the Media 



Sa 449 Advanced Television Production (F, S; 3) 

This course will deal with the study and practice in the produc- 
tion and evaluation of television from conception to broadcast. 
Special emphasis will be placed upon the concept of visualization 
and creative design. The economics of television production and 
budgeting will be discussed as integral parts of program devel- 
opment. Registration by permission only. Marilyn Matelski 

Sa 450 Broadcasting-A Critical Evaluation (S; 3) 

An exploration of contemporary radio and television from a crit- 
ical viewpoint. An appraisal of network and local station pro- 
gramming policies and program content-including entertainment, 
news, public affairs and children's programs. Also being studied 
are broadcasting economics, advertising and the business cor- 
poration; legal regulations; and the sociological impact of the 
media. Donald Hurwitz 

Sa 451 Advanced Television Scriptwriting (S; 3) 

This course is concerned with creative writing for the television 
media rather than sales persuasion, commercials, etc. The pro- 
fessor will give particular attention to the writing of the docu- 
mentary program, to the theatre script and to several types of 
public discussion. Prerequisites for the class include: Intro to 
Television and some other pertinent course work in this 
medium. The Department 

Sa 453 Advanced Journalism (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ability to write, or Introduction to Journalism. 



Arts and Sciences / 97 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE 



Students will learn how to compose their critical thoughts and 
let their individual styles come through their writing in this 
course, which deals explicitly with reviewing films, plays, con- 
certs, albums, books, art, dance, restaurants, television program- 
ming and the news media. In a sense, although most efforts will 
be channeled into improving concepts of writing and analysis, 
this course by its very nature will assume the role of an arts 
appreciation seminar. Desire and willingness to develop expertise 
in this area is imperative. Students will be expected to write 8-10 
reviews and/or articles geared to the formats of newspapers, mag- 
azines or Sunday Supplements. Maureen Goss 

Laurence Barton 

Sa 457 Senior Seminar in the Media (S; 3) 

This course will focus on selected problems in the media. During 
the 1982-83 term, attention will be devoted to: (1) New Journal- 
ism, (2) Childrens Television, (3) Politics and the Media. This 
course is open to senior majors; limited enrollment of other stu- 
dents with the prior consent of the instructor. The Department 

Sa 520 Media Workshop (F, S; 3) 

This program is open to communication majors in junior and 
senior year only and provides them with partial internships in 
the media, including radio and television stations, newspapers, 
periodicals and various areas of the film industry. In a few in- 
stances internships in media-oriented public relations firms are 
available to students. John H. Lawton 

Sa 521 Media Workshop II (F, S; 3) 

Additional apprenticeship training in the media is available for 
departmental majors for a second semester. John H. Lawton 

Sa 522 Media Workshop III (F, S; 3) 

Further experience in mass media and allied areas. 

John H. Lawton 

Sa 594.01 Introduction to Honors (S; 3) 

Under this new arrangement, students wishing to participate in 
the Department's program in honors during their senior year will 
participate in this preparatory course in the second semester of 
their junior year. The professor who will handle this preparatory 
course will review research techniques, deal with scientific sam- 
pling and guide students in selecting a project which can be 
properly researched and reported in the first semester of the sen- 
ior year. Each junior in the class will fully outline his or her 
proposal, select appropriate methods of inquiry and report prob- 
able sources before the course ends. Students who complete this 
preparatory course successfully may move on to Sa 595.01 which 
is scheduled for the first semester of the senior year. Students 
entering honors must have a cumulative grade point average of 
3.4. Donald Fishman 

Sa 595.01 Honors Program in Communications (F; 3) 

Candidates for department honors are those who have done high 
level work in Sa 594.01. During the first semester of their senior 
year these students, with the guidance of a faculty member, will 
complete the proposal drawn in the previous course. 

Communication Faculty 

Sa 597.01 Readings and Research in Communications (F, S; 3) 

Students are not encouraged to employ this course for anything 
but a very specific program, which must be approved by a faculty 
member and by the chairperson as well. 

Sa 603 Survey of Organizational Communication (F; 3) 

This course focuses on several significant areas of communication 
theory that apply to organizational communications. Attention 
is devoted to the use of mass media in corporations, corporate 
public relations, and the development of promotional campaigns 
to foster favorable public opinion. John H. Lawton 



Theatre 

Sa 140 Introduction to the Theatre (F; 3) 

A general course principally for non-majors which emphasizes 
factors influencing form and content in dramatic literature. At- 



tention is also given to director's, actor's, and designer's roles in 
modern theatre practice. /. Paul Marcoux 

Sa 141 Oral Interpretation of Literature (S; 3) 

A basic communication course dealing with the principles and 
techniques of the oral performance of literature. Emphasis will 
be on methods of literary analysis, logical and emotional content 
of literature and performance techniques. Various types of liter- 
ature will be examined from the standpoint of aesthetics as well 
as communication. /. Paul Marcoux 

Sa 143-144 Elements of Theatre Production (F, S; 3, 3) 

A lecture-laboratory course designed for the student of theatre 
who wishes to gain competency in the areas of stagecraft, lighting, 
make-up, costume, stage properties and theatre administration. 
Emphasis is placed on concentrated work and involvement in the 
Boston College Dramatics Society productions. Howard Enoch 

Sa 145 History of Theatre I (F; 3) 

This course follows the simultaneous development of the actor, 
playwright, architect and director from the Dionysian theatre to 
the theatre of Shakespeare. Joseph M. Larkin, S.J. 

Sa 146 History of Theatre II (S; 3) 

Sa 145 

This course deals with the theatre from the Restoration period to 
1900. Growth of the American theatre and developing European 
forms are considered. Joseph M. Larkin, S.J. 

Sa 147 Modern Theatre (S; 3) 

Theatrical and literary analysis of a sixty year period of drama 
ranging from Henrik Ibsen (1890) to Edward Albee (1950). Modern 
theatre in both Europe and America is studied with a concern for 
the historical, social, cultural implications of drama in terms of 
man's relationship to nature, society, work, himself, and the past. 

Joseph M. Larkin, S.J. 

Sa 250 Theatre Management (F; 3) 

This course is designed for students with a joint interest in man- 
agement and theatre production. It will focus on box office pro- 
cedures, accounting, promotion and advertising techniques, 
public relations, audience development and related concerns of 
the theatre administrator. There will be opportunities for intern- 
ship experience in conjunction with the major productions of the 
University Theatre and in professional theatres in Boston. 

The Department 

Sa 252 Creative Dramatics (F; 3} 

Creative Dramatics is a discipline of theatre and education which 
concerns itself with informal dramatic activity for children. Stu- 
dents will be trained to become creative dramatics leaders skilled 
in the use of improvisation, pantomime, movement, storytelling, 
and puppets. Weekly workshops, during class time, will be used 
to develop and reinforce these skills. Emphasis is placed on the 
development of spontaneous informal play as a loosely struc- 
tured, imaginative form of personal expression. 

The Department 

Sa 259 Children's Theatre (S; 3) 

Techniques and methods of producing a wide variety of chil- 
dren's plays from the traditional to the experimental is the con- 
cern of this course. Students in the class will become members 
of the Boston College Children's Theatre Company and have a 
variety of opportunities to produce a children's play that will 
tour Boston College Learning Center Schools. Special consider- 
ation given to the problems of production: scenery, costumes, 
touring shows. The Department 

Sa 302 Principles of Acting (F, S; 3) 

Students of this course will be auditioned in the first two weeks 
to determine the type of acting experiences most appropriate to 
individual needs and experience. The class will then be divided 
to provide a degree of flexibility. Groups will work independently 
on concentration, observation, sense recall and related principles. 
On occasion, groups will re-form for special projects such as voice 
and body work, preparing a role and rehearsal techniques. The 
course does not pre-suppose acting experience but does take for 



98 / Arts and Sciences 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE 



granted a sincerity of purpose in learning about the actor's craft 
as well as the actor's act. Howard Enoch 

/. Paul Marcoux 

Sa 303 Acting Workshop (F, S; 3) 

This course pre-supposes some exposure to the actor's art and 
craft. As with Sa 302 (Principles of Acting), the class will be 
divided to promote unity of aim and perception. The emphasis 
will be on scripted materials with scene work the major means 
of developing believability in a variety of roles. The student 
should be reasonably conversant with a wide spectrum of dra- 
matic literature. Although not restricted to majors, this course is 
not recommended for students unwilling to devote considerable 
time and energy to their own development as performers. 

/. Paul Marcoux 
Howard Enoch 

Sa 306 Play Direction I (F; 3) 

A course in the fundamentals of script analysis, blocking and 
interpretation. Investigation of various schools and techniques of 
play direction, classroom exercises in stage geography, and using 
stage pictures to heighten communication are among the topics 
covered. Although there are no prerequisites for this course, the 
serious student of theatre is advised to complete some work in 
acting or stage movement before taking it. 

Joseph M. Larkin, S.J. 

Sa 307 Play Direction II (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 306 or permission of the instructor. 
A continuation of Sa 306, this course will stress performance. 
The student will be expected to prepare several scenes for class 
evaluation and discussion. Each scene will demonstrate the stu- 
dent's solution to such problems as shifting focus; underlying 
rhythm; adjusting tempo to meet demands of the script; working 
with actors; coordinating the work of the designer, costumer and 
other department heads and adapting materials to better meet the 
needs of audiences. Some students will assist in preparing major 
productions of the University Theatre and the Boston College 
Dramatics Society while others are directing workshop produc- 
tions. /. Paul Marcoux 

Sa 309 Design for the Theatre (S; 3) 

This course will provide the student with the basic principles of 
theatre design. The student will learn how to creatively apply 
design to an interpretation of a work and its characters. There 
will be both a theoretical and practical approach to design. The 
theoretical aspect of the course will examine major historical 
periods, their styles of costume, architecture, furniture and or- 
namentation, from ancient Egypt to the beginning of the 20th 
century. There will be discussions of the particular design re- 
quirements for the various genres of performance, such as drama, 
ballet, and opera. The student will then be required to translate 
this theoretical knowledge into its practical application for a spe- 
cific project such as a particular play, opera, or ballet. This course 
will include a study of the techniques of rendering design in 
various media as well as working with 3-dimensional models. 
The course is recommended for fine arts majors, theatre majors 
and other students with an interest in design. Elena Ivanovo 

Sa 347 Movement for Theatre (F; 3) 

Through warm-up exercises, discussion of design, time, and mo- 
tivation, and individual problem solving, the student will be in- 
troduced to the body as an instrument of the actor. The course 
will include practical experience in movement, experimentation, 
preparation of lines, and reading assignments. We will explore 
the difference between the actor's emotions and the viewers' re- 
sponse and try to understand how the body can be used to 
heighten communication. Working from a relaxed center, we will 
try to experience greater freedom of the voice and interpretive 
expression. The course does not require previous 
experience. Pamela Renna 

Sa 349 Speech for the Stage (F; 3) 

Emphasis in this course is placed on the proper execution of 
speech in conjunction with theatrical characterization. Personal 
development of good speech habits will be encouraged. In ad- 
dition, theory and practice of the analysis of vocal demands for 
theatrical characters is pursued in great detail. The theory of 
phonetical analysis of dialect, the use of vocal range, and the 



control of the speech instrument are also among the key areas of 
concern in this course. The Department 

Sa 360 Stage Design (S; 3) 

A study of the artistic and practical elements involved in pre- 
paring a stage setting, this course will provide drafting experience 
and opportunities for analyzing plays from the standpoint of their 
visual requirements. The history of scene design and its relation 
to other forms will be studied. Sa 143 and Sa 144 are recom- 
mended although not required as background courses. 

Howard Enoch 

Sa 361 Media Lighting (S; 3) 

The theory of illumination for the arts is explored in its fullest 
implications. Theatre, dance, cinema, video, photography, and 
rock and roll lighting will be used as examples of the art of cre- 
ative illumination. As an art form and a practical science, media 
lighting presents a complex subject for detailed investigation. 
Some drafting ability and practical experience in one of the areas 
previously mentioned is desirable as background for the 
course. Howard Enoch 

Sa 454 Playwriting (S; 3) 

Permission of instructor required. 

This is a laboratory course dealing with the basic elements of the 
playwright's art. A fully developed short play will be required. 
Some of these will be given a public production. Joseph M. 
Larkin, S.J. 

Sa 455 Costuming for Theatre (F; 3) 

This course is a practical study of the theory, history and exe- 
cution of theatrical costuming. In the area of theory, subjects such 
as draping, cutting, and pattern drafting are included. A careful 
study of the historical development of costuming as well as the 
role of historical accuracy in current theatrical productions is a 
key portion of the course. Finally, an important part of the course 
is the practical experience gained by participating in the design 
and execution of costumes for University Theatre and Dramatics 
Society productions. Elena Ivanora 

Sa 460 Basic Dance Composition (S; 3) 

This course involves an historical appreciation of how choreo- 
graphic skills developed during the past three centuries and the 
relationship of dance and music structuring. We will consider 
shape, dynamics, rhythm, motivation, abstraction, and the inter- 
play of the different elements involved in a dance piece (such as 
sound, costumes, lights, and general mood). 

Through improvisation and short movement studies, and by 
seeing short pieces that other students have constructed, each 
student will be able to see how these elements actually work. 
Through discussion and criticism, we will encourage experimen- 
tation and individual participation. Two written dance reviews, 
a book review, and a final performance project will be 
required. Pamela Renna 

Sa 464 Experimental Theatre (F; 3) 

An intensive study of several European playwrights who have 
helped to establish trends in the contemporary theatre. Major 
emphasis will be on the work of Brecht, Beckett, Ionesco, Genet 
and Pinter. Some attention will also be given to the experimental 
work of Grotowski, Brook, Chaikin, Beck and others. The course 
will critically examine movements such as "theatre of the ab- 
surd", "theatre of the grotesque", "theatre of cruelty," "theatre 
of ritual", and others. J. Paul Marcoux 

Sa 555 Theatre Aesthetics and Dramatic Criticism (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 146, Sa 147 or permission of the instructor. 
Historical and contemporary theories of art as they apply to the 
theatre are considered. Criteria for judging relative values of cur- 
rent theatrical theory receive attention. Joseph M. Larkin, S.J. 

Sa 556 Senior Seminar in Theatre (F; 3) 

Restricted to senior theatre majors and co-majors, this course has 
three main objectives: 1) to synthesize the undergraduate program 
in theatre and to explore the inter-relatedness of its various as- 
pects; 2) to prepare for and take comprehensive examinations in 
preparation for graduate work in theatre; 3) to actively participate 
in a major research project. This activity will be directly related 
to the student's career goal. This course is required for all theatre 



Arts and Sciences / 99 

THEOLOGY 



majors and co-majors and is not open to others without the ex- 
press permission of the instructor. /. Paul Marcoux 

Sa 595.02 Honors Program in Theatre (F; 3) 

Candidates for the department Honors program are selected in 
the first semester of the junior year. They decide upon their proj- 
ect and, with the guidance of the professor who handles this 
course, they narrow their proposal as may be necessary. They 
also complete a bibliography, prepare a detailed outline of their 
project and submit it for the professor's approval. Those who 
complete this preparation successfully may move on to Sa 596.02 
which is scheduled for the first semester of the senior year. 

Sa 596.02 Honors Program in Theatre (S; 3) 

In this course students undertake the necessary research and 
investigation demanded by their project. They then submit doc- 
umented reports to their faculty advisor who is free to require 
such revisions as he or she may consider necessary. 

Sa 598 Research and Reading in Theatre (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and 12 credit hours in theatre. 

The Department 



Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology 

Sa 171 Introduction to Speech-Language Pathology (F; 3) 

Survey of the major categories of speech, language and hearing 
problems. This course examines child and adult populations and 
introduces concepts of therapeutic management. Normal devel- 
opment and pathological processes are discussed. Linda Rosen 

Sa 172 Phonetics (S; 3) 

Study of the International Phonetic Alphabet with work in tran- 
scription. This course explores theories of sound formation and 
representation with emphasis on American English usage and 
deviations experienced in speech-language-hearing impaired 
population. Linda Rosen 

Sa 180 Language Acquisition (F; 3) 

An overview of the underlying physiological, psychological and 
perceptual processes involved in language development, as well 
as environmental influences. Study of theories of language ac- 
quisition and the developmental patterns seen in normal emer- 
gence of language abilities. Donna Fayad 

Sa 270 Anatomy and Physiology of the Vocal Mechanism (F; 3) 

A study of the anatomy, physiology and neurology of the vocal 
mechanism. Class lectures are supplemented by laboratory ex- 
perience in off-campus facilities. Howard Zubick 

Sa 273 Audiology I (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 171 

A study of audiometric testing and diagnosis. Class lectures are 
supplemented by laboratory experience in off-campus 
facilities. Howard Zubick 

Sa 274 Diagnostic Procedures (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 171 

An introduction to testing procedures in speech and language 
evaluation of adults and children. Test administration experience 
is included. Donna Fayad 

Sa 275 Articulation Theories and Therapies (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 171 and 172 

A concentrated study of sound production impairments with em- 
phasis on functional and organic handicaps. Current literature, 
clinical evaluation and rehabilitation techniques are discussed. 

Linda Rosen 

Sa 283 Seminar in Clinical Methods (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 274 

Concentrated study of therapy methods, test administration pro- 
tocol and test interpretation for skillful speech and language 
evaluation. Donna Fayad 

Sa 377 Clinical Practice (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission required 

A program of supervised therapy. The Department 



Sa 378 Clinical Practice (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission required 
A program of supervised therapy. 

(S;3) 



The Department 



Sa 481 Audiology II 

Prerequisite: Sa 273 

Advanced pure tone testing procedures. In depth discussion of 
discrimination as it pertains to effective use of amplification. 
Introduction to auditory and visual input modalities as they apply 
to the aural rehabilitation process. Howard Zubick 

Sa 483 Aphasia: Theories and Therapies (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 274 

A general introduction to language disorders associated with the 
cerebral vascular accident. Diagnostic and rehabilitation con- 
siderations. The Department 

Sa 485 Stuttering: Theories and Therapies (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 274 

An introduction to current and historical theoretical approaches 
to the problem of stuttering. Review of the therapy approaches 
with particular emphasis on more recent research and treatment 
methods. Linda Rosen 

Sa 487 Language Disorders in Children (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 180 and Sa 274 

Discussion, reading, and examination of materials covering the 
phenomenon of language pathology in children. Study of etiol- 
ogy, differential diagnosis, and theoretical and practical ap- 
proaches to language therapy based upon an understanding of 
the normal language acquisition process. Linda Rosen 

Sa 489 Organic Disorders of Speech (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 274 

Introduction to phonemic and voice disorders resulting from 
maxillofacial and laryngeal abnormalities. Discussion of tests and 
materials used in evaluating individuals with organic disorders. 
In depth study of therapeutic measures. Linda Rosen 

Sa 490 Seminar in Research Methods (S; 3) 

Critical review of current Speech-Language/Audiology research 
literature with specific emphasis on design, analysis and report- 
ing procedures. Howard Zubick 

Sa 595.03 Honors Program in Speech-Language Pathology (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval 

The first of a two-course sequence designed toprovide the excep- 
tional student with an opportunity for an intensive independent 
project. The year-long format involves preparation of a proposal, 
to be approved during Junior year, followed by literature review, 
project execution, and manuscript preparation. Linda Rosen 

Sa 596.03 Honors Program in Speech-Language Pathology (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Sa 595 

The second semester of the Honor Program described above dur- 
ing which the student's manuscript is completed and submitted 
for appropriate revisions. Linda Rosen 

Sa 599 Research and Reading in Speech-Language Pathology and 
Audiology 

Prerequisite: Permission required. 

A one-semester independent study during which the student in- 
vestigates a topic of interest not otherwise included in standard 
course listings and prepares a manuscript. 

In the Speech Science sequence, experiences in a wide variety 
of hospitals, clinics, and other appropriate health-related agencies 
are a vital part of the clinical program. The facilities utilized for 
these experiences are located in Boston and neighboring areas. 
Students are responsible for providing their own transportation 
to and from those facilities. 



Theology 



Faculty 

Gasson Chair Professor Avery Dulles, S.J., A.B., Harvard; Ph.L., 
Woodstock; S.T.L., S.T.D., Gregorian University 



100 / Arts and Sciences 

THEOLOGY 



Professor Ernest L. Fortin, A.A., A.B., Assumption College; S.T.L., 
University of St. Thomas, Rome; Licentiate, University of Paris; 
Doctorate, University of Paris 

Professor James Hennesey, S.J., A.B., Loyola University; Ph.L., 
S.T.B., S.T.L., Woodstock College; Ph.D., Catholic University 

Professor Rev. Philip J. King, A.B., St. John Seminary College; 
S.T.B., St. John Seminary School of Theology; S.T.L., Catholic 
University of America; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute; S.T.D., 
Pontifical Lateran University 

Professor Franz Jozef van Beeck, S.J., Ph.L., Berchmanianum, 
Nijmegen; Ph.D., Universiteit van Amsterdam; S.T.L., Cani- 
sianum, Maastricht 

Visiting Distinguished Professor Rev. Bernard J. F. Lonergan, S.J. 

A.B., Heythrop College; S.T.L., S.T.D., Gregorian University 

Associate Professor Stephen F. Brown, A.B., St. Bonaventure Uni- 
versity; A.M., Franciscan Institute; Ph.L., Ph.D., Universite de 
Louvain 

Associate Professor Lisa Sowle Cahill, A.B., University of Santa 
Clara; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Associate Professor Mary F. Daly, A.B., College of St. Rose in Al- 
bany; A.M., Catholic University; S.T.L., S.T.D., Ph.D., University 
of Fribourg 

Associate Professor Robert Daly, S.J., Chairman of the Department 
A.B., A.M., Boston College; A.M., Catholic University; Dr. Theol., 
University of Wurzburg 

Associate Professor Harvey Egan, S.J., B.S., Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute; A.M., Boston College; Th.M., Woodstock College; Dr. 
Theol., University of Munster (Germany) 

Associate Professor J. Cheryl Exum, A.B., Wake Forest University; 
A.M., M.Phil., Columbia University 

Associate Professor Rev. Thomas H. Groome, A.B., St. Patrick's 
College, Ireland; A.M., Fordham University; Ed.D., Columbia 
Teachers College 

Associate Professor Frederick Lawrence, A.B., St. John's College; 
D.Th., University of Basel 

Associate Professor David Neiman, A.B., A.M., University of Chi- 
cago; Ph.D., Dropsie College for Hebrew Learning 

Associate Professor Rev. James A. O'Donohoe, A.B., Boston College; 
J. CD., Catholic University of Louvain 

Associate Professor Pheme Perkins, A.B., St. John's College; A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Anthony Saldarini, A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
Ph.L., Weston College; A.M., Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor Margaret Amy Schatkin, A.B., Queens College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Fordham University; (Cand.) Th.D., Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary 

Associate Professor Theodore Steeman, O.F.M., B.D., Weert; Drs. 
Soc. University of Leyden; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Thomas E. Wangler, B.S., LeMoyne College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Marquette University 

Assistant Professor Mary Boys, S.N.J.M., A.B., Fort Wright College; 
M.A., Columbia University; Ed.D., Columbia University 

Assistant Professor Edward R. Callahan, A.B., A.M., Boston Col- 
lege; S.T.L., Weston College; S.T.D., Gregorian University 

Assistant Professor Gerald T. Carney, A.B., Cathedral College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Assistant Professor David F. Carroll, S.J., A.B., College of the Holy 
Cross; A.M., Boston College; S.T.L., Weston College 

Assistant Professor Patricia E. DeLeeuw, A.B., University of Detroit; 
M.S.L., Pontifical Institute of Medeival Studies; A.M., Ph.D., 
University of Toronto 

Assistant Professor Miles L. Fay, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
Ph.L., S.T.L., Weston College; S.T.D., University of St. Thomas 
Aquinas, Rome 

Assistant Professor James Halpin, S.J., A.B., A.M., M.S., Boston 



College; Th.L., San Francisco, Barcelona, Spain; S.T.D., Gregorian 
University, Rome 

Assistant Professor Claire Lowery, R.S.C.J., A.B., University of San 
Diego; M.Div., D.Min., Andover Newton Theological School 

Assistant Professor H. John McDargh, A.B., Emory University; 
Ph.D. Harvard University 

Assistant Professor Susan M. Praeder, B.A., Radcliffe College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 

Assistant Professor Patrick J. Ryan, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
A.M., Assumption College; S.T.L., Weston College; S.T.D., Gre- 
gorian University 

Assistant Professor James M. Weiss, A.B., Loyola University of 
Chicago; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Lecturer Padraic O'Hare, Associate Director of Institute of Reli- 
gious Education and Service 

A.B., St. Francis College; A.M., Fordham University; A.M., Man- 
hattan College; Ed.D., Columbia University 

Lecturer Francis Sullivan, S.J., A.B., Boston College; A.M., Boston 
College; S.T.L., Boston College; Dr. Theol., l'lnstitut Catholique 
de Paris 



Program Description 



The Major Program 

Boston College offers to theology majors opportunities and pro- 
grams unmatched among major universities. The department has 
over thirty full-time faculty members and draws upon the services 
of some fifteen other adjunct members. Advanced majors can 
cross-register into some 700 courses taught by 150 faculty mem- 
bers in the other eight schools of the Boston Theological Institute: 
Andover Newton Theological School, Boston University School 
of Theology, Episcopal Divinity School, Harvard Divinity School, 
Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, Holy Cross Greek Ortho- 
dox Seminary, Saint John's Seminary, Weston School of Theol- 
ogy. In short, majors have ready access to the resources of one of 
the world's great theological centers. 

The discipline of theology is an intellectual reflection upon the 
experience of faith. Students major in it for a variety of reasons: 
as preparation for eventual academic or religious careers, as back- 
ground for work or teaching in religious education, as an intel- 
lectually or personally integrating liberal arts experience, or 
simply, in conjunction with other academic or career objectives, 
as an aid to a more effective personal assimilation of the riches 
of the Western religious tradition. 

For this reason, the department's student advisory system ar- 
ranges, according to each student's needs and abilities, an indi- 
vidualized program within the following framework (includes 
university core requirements): 

Introductory Courses (usually core or level one): 
1 Old Testament 

1 New Testament 

2 from the following three areas: 
Systematics 

Historical Theology 

Religion and Society (at least one course in Religion and 
Society is required, at the core level or at a higher level.) 
Level Three Electives: 

1 Bible 

1 Systematics 

1 Historical Theology (a course in Church History is recom- 
mended on the core level, or level 3) 

3 Electives 

Majors are encouraged to engage in cross-disciplinary work, 
especially with other humanities departments and the social sci- 
ences. It is also possible for students in the School of Management 
and for secondary education majors in the School of Education 
to major in Theology, and for Theology majors to concentrate in 
education in the School of Education. Outstanding students are 



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THEOLOGY 



encouraged to write honors theses or become Scholars of the 
College. 

On the graduate level, the department offers the MA. and the 
Ph.D. in Theology. The Institute for Religious Education and Pas- 
toral Ministry, whose faculty members are full-time members of 
the Theology Department, offers the M.A. in Pastoral Ministry, 
the M.Ed, and Certificate of Advanced Educational Specialization 
(C.A.E.S.) in Religious Education, and the Ph.D. in Religion and 
Education. 



The Core Program 
The Goals of the Core 

In all theology core courses, the department has in mind three 
goals. The first two goals are essential to the theology core, the 
third goal is optional and applies in varying ways only to some 
courses. 

1. There is a general, liberal arts educational goal by which 
all core Theology courses aim, in general, to inculcate a sensitivity 
to the religious suppositions of our culture. More particularly, 
they aim to help students acquire, e.g., (a) a coherent view of 
what religion is and how it develops; (b) a thought-out basis for 
freedom and moral action; (c) a reflective awareness of whatever 
their own inner experience of God and religious reality might be. 
Ultimately, they aim to help the student both to appreciate the 
forms in which the religious and theological insights of humanity 
are expressed, and to integrate religious knowledge and experi- 
ence into a total world view. 

2. There is a specific, theological goal by which core theology 
courses include instruction in the significant phenomena of the 
Christian tradition as well as of other major living religious tra- 
ditions. They are content-oriented, deal with a fairly broad range 
of material, and introduce the student to at least one method of 
understanding religious phenomena, such as: biblical/exegetical, 
historical, doctrinal/systematic, ethical and/or social-scientific. 
This is done in such a way that comparison and contrast with 
other methods (theological or other) is possible. 

3. Some core theology courses also have, in addition, specif- 
ically religious or confessional goals such as: (a) an introduction 
to a specific religious tradition or experience (Catholic, Jewish, 
Eastern Orthodox, etc.); (b) an invitation to belief; (c) a healing 
of past negative religious experience; (d) special attention to the 
affective as well as to the reflective and analytic aspects of religion 
and theology. The course descriptions will generally give indi- 
cation of these goals. The student is invited to consult with the 
particular professor or with the department for further clarifica- 
tion. 

Fulfilling the Core 

The university core requirement of 6 credit-hours in theology 
may be fulfilled according to one of three models: 

I. Most theology core courses are individual 3-credit courses 
designed to meet the core goals while concentrating on one 
of the major approaches to theology: biblical, historical, eth- 
ical and doctrinal. The Core requirement is fulfilled by taking 
two of these courses. Code: Core I. 

II. There are a certain number of six-credit, two-semester courses 
which provide a broad introduction to one of the major ap- 
proaches to theology, but in such a way as to meet the general 
liberal-arts-educational and theological goals of the core. 
Within this model are two options: 

A. Th 041 + 042; 284 + 294: six-credit, full-year courses. 
Code: Core II A. 

B. Th 129 + 130; 178 + 179; 217 + 218: six-credit, two-se- 
mester courses (3 credits each semester) in which, if the 
course is open, the second semester may be taken in- 
dependently of the first. Code: Core II B. 

III. There are also some integrated, 12-credit, full-year, combined 
courses in Theology and Philosophy. Within this model are 
three options: 

A. Th/Pl 090 Perspectives on Western Culture (about 12 
sections available). Code: Core III A. 

B. Th/Pl 088&089 Person and Social Responsibility (Pulse 
only; about 3 sections available.) Code: Core HI B. 



C. Th/Pl 083&084 Explorations in Social Ethics (one to two 
sections available). Code: Core III C. 



Course Offerings 

Th 001 Introductory Biblical Hebrew (F, S; 3) 

The study of the fundamentals of biblical Hebrew grammar and 
the acquisition of a vocabulary of the frequently occurring words 
in the Hebrew Old Testament will be the objectives of this intro- 
duction. Jeremiah Donovan, S.J. 

Th 005 Genesis: A Jewish Interpretation (F; 3) 

A seminar examining the primary book of the Bible for its literary 
composition, historical roots, moral and theological implications. 
Core I Albert Goldstein 

Th 009 Fundamentals of Judaism (F, S; 3) 

A survey of the basic principles of religion and their expression 
in Judaism, and an examination of Jewish religious ideas as ex- 
pressed in literature set within its historical context. 
Core I Albert Goldstein 

Murray Rothman 

Th 021 Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) 
(F;3) 

An introduction to the literature, religious ideas, and historical 
setting of the Hebrew Bible (Christian Old Testament). Focus will 
be on major biblical concepts such as creation, election, and cov- 
enant, with some attention to their development within the 
prophetic and wisdom traditions. J. Cheryl Exum 

Core I Philip King 

Th 023-024 Faith and History of the Jewish People I, II 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

A survey of the history of the Jewish People, focusing on critical 
periods and issues in social and religious life. This course will 
examine the growth and development of Jewish Theology, effects 
on Judaism of interrelationships between the Church and the 
Jews, the contacts between Judaism and Islam, and the struggle 
within the Jewish Community between secular and religious au- 
thority. 
Core I David Neiman 

Th 026 Themes of the Old Testament (F, S; 3) 

This course will give students the chance to explore the origins 
of two important religions of Western culture, Judaism and Chris- 
tianity. The foundational experiences of the Hebrew people and 
the basic ideas about human life and religious belief which arose 
from these experiences will be studied. Theodore Hiebert 

Th 037 Jewish Background to the New Testament (F; 3) 

This course will deal with the historical background of the Jewish 
world from the time of the Restoration (the rebuilding of Jeru- 
salem and the Temple in the 6th century B.C.E.) until the writing 
of the Gospels of the New Testament (in the 1st century of the 
Christian Era). 

The religious developments in Judaism will be examined as 
they were affected by political events and as they in turn had 
their influence on political changes. These religious develop- 
ments will be traced to their influence in the rise and growth of 
the Christian Faith. The Jewish background to the New Testament 
will be examined and analyzed. 
CORE I David Neiman 

Th 050 Introduction to the New Testament (F, S; 3) 

This course introduces the student to the cultural, historical and 
religious milieu in which early Christianity emerged and devel- 
oped during its first century. Each New Testament work is ex- 
amined in light of its situation in the early Church which led to 
its writing. The student is introduced to the methods used by 
modern biblical scholarship in understanding the "setting" of 
early Christian literature. Graeco-Roman history, culture and re- 
ligion are studied insofar as they are presupposed in New Tes- 
tament writings. 
Core I Pheme Perkins 

Th 052 Jesus the Christ: New Testament Perspectives (F, S; 3) 

Introduction to New Testament perspectives on Jesus, focusing 
on the resurrection, passion and infancy narratives of the four 



102 / Arts and Sciences 

THEOLOGY 



gospels, working "backward" from the resurrection narratives in 
order to show their significance for the formation of the gospels. 
Core I Mary C. Boys, S.N./.M. 

Th 054 Being a Christian: New Testament Perspectives (F, S; 3) 

A consideration of the New Testament as a basis for contemporary 
Christian life and belief. Two themes will organize the course: 
the Christian in relation to God and Christian responsibility 
within the church and in the world. Among the topics to be 
addressed are New Testament theology and Christology, spirit- 
uality, ministry, Christian community, personal and political re- 
sponsibility, human rights, tradition, and inspiration. 
Core I Susan Praeder 

Th 070 Sacramental Theology (F, S; 3) 

A survey of the seven sacramental actions through which the 
liturgical worship of the Roman Catholic Church is chiefly ex- 
pressed. The course will investigate the biblical roots of sacra- 
mental theology, and attempt to trace its development from the 
post-Apostolic period to the liturgical reforms introduced by Vat- 
ican II. 
Core I Edward Callahan, S.J. 

Th 078-079 French Religious Thinkers from Pascal to the Pres- 
ent (F, S; 3, 3) 

The course attempts to trace the evolution of French religious 
thought from the seventeenth century to the Post-World War pe- 
riod and Vatican II. It focuses on a number of representative 
thinkers who have shaped the French tradition either by defend- 
ing religion, or by attacking it. Primary sources, to be read in the 
original, have been preferred throughout. Ernest Fortin 

Th 083-084 Explorations in Social Ethics (F, S; 6, 6) 

This course is a twelve-credit, two-semester course, fulfilling the 
core requirement in both Theology and Philosophy. The aim of 
the course is to familiarize the student with the main philosoph- 
ical and theological traditions in ethical thought in Western cul- 
ture, as these traditions develop in social, economic and cultural 
history, and as they now can be drawn upon and further devel- 
oped to deal with the social problems of the current world sit- 
uation. 
Core III C Bruce Moncrieff 

Th 085 Faith, Reason and Revelation (F; 3) 

This course will study the questions that face the seekers and the 
doubters of the present age. Initial seminars and discussions will 
determine the direction and stress. Motivation, intelligibility and 
growth in a living act of faith will be studied. The personal aspect 
of faith as it looks at revelation will conclude the course. 
Core I David F. Carroll, S.J. 

Th 088-089 Person and Social Responsibility (F, S; 6, 6) 

This is a two-semester, twelve-credit course that fulfills all the 
core requirements in philosophy and theology. The course re- 
quirements include both ongoing involvement in one of the field 
projects available through the Pulse Program, as well as partici- 
pation in a correlated class. The course will focus on problems 
of social injustice, and the possibilities of surmounting those 
injustices. The field projects will put students directly in contact 
with people experiencing the consequences of one or another 
form of social injustice. The classes will attempt to take a deeper 
look into these, especially with regard to their origins in the lives 
of individuals and society. Drawing on the works, both contem- 
porary and traditional, of philosophical and religious figures, the 
classes will engage students in asking the basic moral questions 
"What is Justice?" "What is Happiness?" and "What kind of so- 
ciety do we live in?" Pulse only. 

Core III B (Pulse) Patrick Byrne 

Louise Carroll 
Margaret Gorman, R. S.C.J. 

Th 090 Perspectives on Western Culture I, II (F, S; 6, 6) 

This is a special two-semester, twelve-credit course that fulfills 
all the core requirements in philosophy and theology. The course 
will introduce the students into their philosophical and religious 
heritage through a study of the writings of the major thinkers who 
have formed our cultural traditions. The purpose of the course 
is to encourage students to discover the sources of those values 



that have formed their lives as well as to develop a critical and 
creative perspective toward themselves and their future. 
Core III A Stephen Brown 

Charles He/ling 

Pheme Perkins 

Anthony Saldarini 

James Weiss 

Th 098 Black Theology in America (F; 3) 

The intention of our inquiry will be to understand the phenom- 
ena — Black Theology. This requires our examining the particular 
way Black people appropriate the basic resources of theology, 
and then create their own story about God and the way the world 
is and ought to be. 

Fundamental to understanding the theology of blacks in Amer- 
ica is having a feel for what it meant and means to be black in 
America. As critical to understanding Black Theology is the ex- 
amination of the theological expressions of the black community. 
These two foci portend the method of inquiry for this course of 
study. 
Core I Charles Stith 

Th 102 Contemporary Black Theology (S; 3) 

This course is designed to survey the thought of the major con- 
temporary black theologians such as James Cone, DeOtis Roberts, 
Albert Cleaje, etc. Attention will be given to the background of 
contemporary black theology and the influence of the civil rights 
and the black power movements. 
Core I Charles Stith 

Th 107 Religion in Africa (F; 3) 

The course is designed to introduce the varieties of African re- 
ligious experience. The content and significance of African re- 
ligion as an autochthonous religion will be outlined. Christianity 
and Islam as the extended religions to Africa will be discussed. 
While emphasis will be laid on the impact religion has had on 
African communities within the context of peace and justice in 
the world, the course will also consider the role of religion in 
changing Africa. Aloysius Lugira 

Th 108 Christianity in Africa (S; 3) 

This course is intended to give a historical bird's-eye-view of 
Christianity in Africa. While Christianity in general will be 
touched on, emphasis will be laid on the development and the 
extension of the Catholic tradition in Africa. The three stages 
within which Christianity has so far been established in Africa 
will be discussed. Finally a theological outline of the response 
Christiantiy has received in Africa will be considered for the 
purpose of visualizing the future role of Christianity in changing 
Africa. Aloysius Lugira 

Un 110 Horizons of the New Social Sciences (F, S; 3, 3) 

The course is designed to lead the student to an understanding 
of the unity that underlies the diversity of the separate social 
sciences of economics, sociology, political science and law from 
a viewpoint that does not prescind from theological issues. 

Frederick Lawrence 

Th 116 Evangelism in the Early Church (F, S; 3) 

The mission and expansion of Christianity in the ancient world. 
How the early church communicated the good news of salvation 
to Jews and Gentiles. Topics include: Religion and Society in the 
Roman Empire, the preaching and teaching of the Apostles, con- 
version, and consolidation of the Evangelistic outreach in cate- 
chesis and apologetics. 
Core I Margaret Schatkin 

Th 117 Dimensions of World Hunger (F; 3) 

An investigation of the nature of the world hunger problem from 
various perspectives. Offered by the Program for the Study of 
Peace and War. 
Level One Jeanne Gallo 

Th 123 Suffering and the Challenge to Belief (F; 3) 

What response can any one make to the human suffering of this 
age? One might begin in utter confoundment and end in anger, 
forsaking the possibility of understanding. One might begin in 
anger and end in stoicism, uncomprehending but resigned. One 
might begin in stoicism and, gradually or suddenly, achieve in- 



Arts and Sciences / 103 

THEOLOGY 



sight and understanding in ways mysterious and unexpected. We 
will examine each of these responses during the semester with 
reference to literature, theology and field experiences. 
Core I (Pulse) Richard Keeley 

Th 124 Faith, Work, Vocation (S; 3) 

In what senses can we speak of our work as vocation, a "calling" 
to service? This course, intended for PULSE students, explores 
the relationships between faith, work, and vocation by exami- 
nation of Biblical, biographical and theological texts. Field place- 
ment required. 
Core I (Pulse) Richard KeeJey 

Th 129-130 Christianity: The Medieval Experience I and II 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

A two-semester survey of the Christian experience of medieval 
men and women. The course will center on those facets of the 
shape of the Church which were innovations of the Middle Ages, 
and survive in the present: problems of Church and state; the 
Papacy, diocese, and parish; popular belief and practice; art and 
architecture. The student may enroll in either one, or both of the 
semesters, which will be divided chronologically: part one will 
focus on the legacy of the early Church and the early Middle 
Ages, and part two will focus on the high and late Middle Ages. 
Core II B Patricia DeLeeuw 

Th 131 Introduction to the Study of Religion and Christianity 
(F, S; 3) 

The course will make use of various approaches to the study of 
religion. We will begin by thinking about the general nature of 
religious experience and some categories of religious phenomena 
common to several cultures primitive and literate, agricultural 
and technological. Then, we will consider how such experiences 
and phenomena develop within a single religious tradition. Fi- 
nally, we will treat philosophical approaches to religion: the dif- 
ferences between philosophy and theology and the methods of 
faith and reason. 
Core I James Weiss 

Th 140 Bonhoeffer and Teilhard de Chardin (F, S; 3) 

This course is a quest for a contemporary theology and spiritu- 
ality. We will study two stimulating and innovative thinkers who 
have had a profound effect on theology. Neither was a hero during 
his lifetime. Dietrich Bonhoeffer was shot to death in a German 
prison. Teilhard de Chardin died, alone and misunderstood, in 
New York City. During the course much will be made of discus- 
sion in class and seminars. The writing of journals will deepen 
reflection and understanding. 
Core I Edward S. Stanton, S.J. 

Th 150-151 The Christian Community: A History (F, S; 3, 3) 

The first semester of this course will trace the development of 
life, structure, and worship in the Christian community from first 
century Jewish sect to the eve of the 16th century Reformation. 
The second semester will continue the development of the com- 
munity from the Reformation to the 20th century. 
Core II B The Department 

Th 152 (Hs 207) Islamic Civilization in the Middle East (F; 3) 

What have been the major achievements of this religious culture 
at the strategic cross-roads of Asia, Africa, and Europe? Topics 
to include: the relation of Islam to the religions of antiquity, the 
Muslim religion as a way of life, the impact of Islam on the Middle 
East from the seventh century to the present. Benjamin Braude 

Th 154 Eastern Orthodox Christianity (F;3) 

An introduction to Eastern Orthodox Christianity, including a 
historical survey, perspectives in Eastern Orthodox Theology, 
worship practices, monasticism and spirituality, as well as con- 
temporary issues in Eastern Orthodox Christianity. 
Core I Lewis Patsavos 

Th 155 Contemporary Issues in the Eastern Orthodox Church 
(S;3) 

This course deals with many of the controversial issues of our 
time and examines them from an Orthodox Christian doctrinal, 
ethical, canonical and spiritual perspective. Issues to be exam- 
ined include a wide range of material: history, theology, liturgy, 
canonical order, the ecumenical movement, mission, morality. 



The course will seek to shed light on issues of faith, church life, 
sex and family, and social awareness and to evaluate them from 
an Orthodox Christian perspective. It will ultimately seek to de- 
termine the destiny of the Eastern Orthodox Church in this last 
quarter of the twentieth century, in a world radically different 
from that which shaped the mentality, thought-forms, and life- 
styles of Orthodox Christians hitherto. 
Core I Lewis Patsavos 

Th 164 Religion in America: A Survey (F, S; 3) 

This course will survey the major religious movements and 
denominations in the United States from the founding of James- 
town to the present. 
Core I Thomas WangJer 

Th 171 Freedom to be Free (F, S; 3) 

Towards a theology of personal freedom. Because of some Church 
structures, community and family tensions, peer pressures and 
inner compulsions many people are deprived of that personal 
and social liberty which Christ bequeathed to his followers. Such 
topics as freedom in love, in friendship, in service, freedom 
through the Cross, poverty as freedom and the dialogue of free- 
dom will be studied and discussed. 
Core I Edward S. Stanton, S.J. 

Th 172 The Four Gospels (F; 3) 

An introduction to the Gospels which will make use of the main 
critical methods (source, form and redaction criticism) in order 
to study the unique approach of each evangelist to the person of 
Jesus as an historical and theological figure. 
Core I Francis Fallon 

Th 173 Introduction to World Religions (F, S; 3) 

An introduction to the origins, development and current meaning 
of some major spiritual traditions. This course is designed to 
show the diversity of religious traditions as well as indicate the 
common questions that the various traditions address. The course 
will begin with a consideration of the relation between religion 
and the human condition as we experience it. In the light of this 
introduction, we will examine several traditions chosen from the 
Jewish, Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, Confucian, Taoist and Amer- 
ican Indian religious traditions. 
Core I Gerald Carney 

Th 178-179 Philosophy and Theology I and II (F, S; 3, 3) 

In lecture-discussion format, to consider the question: What is 
the relationship between Philosophy and Theology? We will ex- 
plore the dialectical and foundational issues connected with in- 
telligent and informed discussion of this question. Readings to 
be from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas. 
Core I Frederick Lawrence 

Th 180 Theologies of Love (F, S; 3) 

We generally admit that love is important, in fact a matter of 
ultimate concern. Yet, too often we believe that love is just a 
sentiment or something we fall into (and out of). We forget that 
love is an art which requires knowledge and effort. "There is 
hardly any activity which starts with such tremendous hope and 
expectations, and yet, which fails so regularly as love." (Fromm) 
This course aims at deepening our knowledge of love by a study 
and analysis of ancient and contemporary works on this most 
important subject. Poetry, religious and secular, will give further 
insights into the nature of Agape, brotherly, motherly, fatherly 
love, friendship, courtly, romantic, and erotic love. 
Core I John McCarthy, S.J. 

Th 181 Comparative Religious Study: Hinduism, Buddhism and 
Christianity (S; 3) 

These three world religious traditions present fundamentally dif- 
ferent understandings of the human situation and the religious 
transformation required to respond to it. They understand divine 
reality (God) in different ways or even deny its applicability to 
the real human problem. All of this diversity, however, points to 
similar religious concerns and invites a deeper understanding of 



104 / Arts and Sciences 

THEOLOGY 



religious process and the causes and significance of religious 

difference. 

Core I Gerald Carney 

Th 190 Theology of the Religious Experience (F, S; 3) 

This course will seek to study through various readings, partic- 
ularly those of an autobiographical nature, a person's experience 
of God, religion, the sacred. Such topics as the following will be 
treated: the role of the religious sentiment in the individual, a 
person's search for God, religious identity and maturity, religious 
faith, conversion experiences, religious enthusiasm, prayer and 
mysticism. 
Core I Charles Healey, S.J. 

Th 200 The Church's Worship: Theory and Practice (F, S; 3) 

This course will focus on the contemporary experience of Chris- 
tian Worship since the Second Vatican Council. The theoretical 
component of the course will explore the history, background 
and development of the Church's liturgy; i.e., the Mass, the Prayer 
of the Church, the Sacraments, with particular emphasis on the 
meaning of liturgy for today's Church. The practical component 
of the course will involve all students in creating a worshipping 
community, planning and execution of Eucharistic and other 
kinds of liturgies, prayer services etc. with special emphasis on 
the integration of the arts in public worship. 
Core I Laetitia Blain 

Robert VerEecke, S.J. 

Th 202 Theology of the Divine Presence (F, S; 3) 

After a study of the divine attributes from reason and theological 
sources, this course pursues the witness of both the Old and New 
Testaments to the Divine Presence, and presents a study of spe- 
cific modes of God's natural, supernatural and ministerial pres- 
ence in the created universe, as well as the indwelling presence 
in the souls of those who make a total response in faith in their 
personal encounter with God. Classical and modern spiritual 
writers will be discussed. 
Core I Miles Fay, S.J. 

Th 211 Theology of Christ (F, S; 3) 

Biblical, historical and Conciliar sources define the reality of the 
person and mission of Jesus Christ in the facts of the Incarnation 
and total Christ-Event of Christianity. The subordinate, but effi- 
cacious role of Mary in the redemption of the human race, sum- 
marized in the teachings of Vatican II, and subject of prominent 
ecumenical concern, will also be included. 
Core I Miles Fay, S.J. 

Th 213-214 Foundations of Catholic Theology I and II 
(F, S; 3, 3) 

Since Vatican II, how much and in what specific ways has the 
understanding of the Catholic faith changed and/or remained the 
same? The over-all Catholic heritage, as well as specific exeget- 
ical, dogmatic, historical, systematic, and ecumenical questions, 
will be considered in the light of Vatican II. 
Core I Harvey D. Egan, S.J. 

Th 217 Catholicism I (F; 3) 

A comprehensive exposition of Catholic theology from an his- 
torical, doctrinal, and ecumenical perspective. Part I treats the 
following questions: the interrelationships among faith, theology, 
and belief; the meaning of human existence (a multi-disciplinary 
exploration); the problem of God (revelation, religious pluralism, 
providence, the Trinity, etc.); and Jesus Christ (New Testament 
data, doctrinal development, contemporary views, including a 
discussion of Jesus' self-consciousness, sexuality, and sinless- 
ness). 
Core II B Edward Callahan, S.J. 

Th 218 Catholicism II (S; 3) 

A comprehensive exposition of Catholic theology from an his- 
torical, doctrinal, and ecumenical perspective. Part II treats the 
following questions: the Church (New Testament data, history, 
Vatican II, mission, sacraments, authority, ministry, Mariology, 
etc.) and Christian existence (ethics, spirituality, eschatology). 
Core I Edward Callahan, S.J. 

Th 221 Christian Imagination (F; 3) 

An introduction to theologies of beauty. The course will consider 
how Christians sought to present the figure of Jesus Christ through 



the creation of beautiful color, beautiful language, beautiful 
sound, beautiful space and motion. Under each topic, the art of 
painting, poetry, music, liturgy, will be considered as ways of 
creating for believers an experience of Jesus Christ as He was and 
is cherished as the center of belief. Also under each topic will be 
considered the conflicts Christians felt concerning the artistic 
presentation of religious experience. The ultimate purpose of the 
course will be to draw some conclusions concerning theologies 
of beauty in Christianity. 
Core I Francis P. Sullivan, S.J. 

Th 224 Religious Dimension in Modern Literature (F; 3) 

An examination of the religious dimension of reality as mani- 
fested in Melville's Moby Dick, Dostoievsky's The Idiot, Joyce's 
Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man, Greene's The Heart of the 
Matter and Kazantzakis's The Greek Passion. 
Core I Stephen Brown 

Th 244 Faith and Identity (F, S; 3) 

The course approaches faith as a universal human process of 
meaning making whereby individuals and communities relate 
themselves to the ultimate conditions of their existence. As a 
dynamic, life-long process faith is intimately related to the de- 
velopment of a sense of self, or an identify. In other words, our 
depth answers to the question "who am I?" are closely connected 
to our answers to the question "who or what is ultimately trust- 
worthy in my life?" The resources of both psychology and the- 
ology are brought to bear on exploring this relationship. 
Core I John McDargh 

Th 248-250 Perspectives on War, Aggression and Conflict 
Resolution I, II (F, S; 3, 3) 

Level I Rein Uritam et al. 

Th 272 The Nature, Dignity and Destiny of the Human 
Person F, S; 3) 

This course deals with the Theological Virtues, especially Faith; 
and with the Cardinal Virtues, especially Prudence, Justice, Tem- 
perance. 
Core I Felix Talhot, S.J. 

Th 284-294 Introduction to Catholic Theological Ethics I and 
II (F, S;3, 3) 

This course is concerned with basic concepts relative to an un- 
derstanding of the ethical posture of the Roman Catholic Church. 
It will treat of the following: the nature and methodology of Chris- 
tian/Catholic ethics, the role of objective moral norms, the role 
of conscience, the mystery of social and personal sin. The theory 
will be illustrated by specific examples of moral problems prev- 
alent in Church and society. 
Core II A Rev. James A. O'Donohoe 

Th 289 Christian Ethics: Foundations and Applications (S; 3) 

An introduction to various perspectives on ethics and decision- 
making which have developed within the Christian community, 
e.g., "biblical" ethics, "natural law" ethics, and "situation" eth- 
ics. The theoretical bases of Christian ethics will be explored 
critically and then applied to concrete problems, such as just war, 
sexual ethics, abortion, and use of natural resources. The course 
will not aim to present one set of answers, but to provoke analysis 
of sources and argumentation in ethics. 
Core I Lisa Sowle Cahill 

Th 299 Readings and Research— Level I (F, S; 3) 

Some professors make time available for projects which are not 
covered by present course offerings. The student is responsible 
for gaining the consent of the professor for such a program; and 
such programs are limited in number. The Department 

Th 305 Pentateuch (S; 3) 

Examination of the composition and final shape of the Pentateuch 
as a literary and theological document. Major themes will be 
traced and selected passages will be exegated. J. Cheryl Exum 

Th 306 Hebrew Poetry: Prophecy and Wisdom (F; 3) 

An introduction to the prophetic and wisdom movements in an- 
cient Israel through exegesis of selected texts. Attention to ques- 



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tions of stylistics and aesthetics as well as historical setting and 
theological significance. J. Cheryl Exum 

Th 312 The Psalms and Their Meaning for Today 

A form-critical analysis of selected Psalms with emphasis on their 

theological content and relevance for today. 

Offered Spring, 1983-1984 Philip King 

Th 314 The Search for Wisdom in Christianity and Judaism 

This course will examine the canonical and deutero-canonical 

wisdom books of the Old Testament, the presence of wisdom in 

the New Testament and the development of wisdom in Rabbinic 

literature. Dominant themes and select passages will be stressed. 

Faith and rational understanding of the world will be central 

topics. 

Offered Fall, 1983-1984 Anthony /. Saldarini 

Th 315 (Hs 315) Christians and Jews under Islam: Religious and 
National Identities in the Middle East (F; 3) 

Over the last one hundred years nationalism has seemed to re- 
place religion-based notions of community in the Middle East. 
In some instances religion has been used to promote loyalty to 
the nation while in others it has seemed to be at war with it. How 
have the past experiences of Christians and Jews living under 
Islam affected their response to this transformation? Related top- 
ics to be discussed include: tolerance and intolerance in Islam, 
Ottoman policies toward non-Muslims, secularization of religious 
loyalty, confessionalism in Lebanon, and Christian and Jewish 
minorities in the Arab world. Benjamin Braude 

Th 319 Second Isaiah (S; 3) 

This prophet will be treated in terms of his historical environment 
and his own time; his oracles make little sense if one is ignorant 
of his milieu. Key passages will be studied in depth. Serious 
consideration will be given to the relevance of Second Isaiah in 
our own day. Hebrew is not required. However, this is not a 
beginner's course; an introductory course is prerequisite. 

Philip King 

Th 321 Book of Genesis as Theology and as Literature (F; 3) 

The book of Genesis is a masterpiece of literature and a rich 
source of theology; at the same time it is relevant literature. This 
course will provide an overview of the book of Genesis and will 
concentrate on some key passages in an effort to appreciate their 
literary value and to extract their theological richness. A knowl- 
edge of Hebrew is not required, but it would enhance the course. 
A background in Old Testament is presupposed; this is not a 
beginner's course. Philip King 

Th 341 Rabbinic Commentaries to the Bible (S; 3) 

This course will introduce the student to the major Jewish Com- 
mentators on the Old Testament who flourished in Western Eu- 
rope in the 12th century. These Hebrew Commentaries were 
studied by the English translators of the Authorized Version of 
the Bible and their influence is noticeable in the King James Bible. 
These commentaries reflect Jewish thought, folklore, and literary 
traditions. Prerequisite is at least one course in Old Testament. 

David Neiman 

Th 358 The Johannine Church (F; 3) 

A detailed study of the Gospel of John and the Johannine Letters. 
This course will analyze the development of the Johannine 
church from its origins into the second century A.D. Particular 
attention is paid to the development of the picture of Jesus within 
the Johannine tradition. 
Offered Fall, 1983-1984 Pheme Perkins 

Th 360 Synoptic Gospels (F; 3) 

After a survey of the synoptic tradition and an introduction to 
narrative analysis and interpretation, Matthew, Mark and Luke 
will be studied separately and comparatively as narrative Chris- 
tologies and as narratives of first century Christian community. 
Among the topics to be addressed are: narrative worlds and nar- 
ration in miracle stories and parables. Sequence structure and 



scriptural reference in the three synoptics, and the relations be- 
tween message, means and meaning in narrative. 

Susan Praeder 

Th 363 Luke-Acts as a Narrative Theology 

A study of Luke-Acts as a narrative theology, a story of the sal- 
vation of God in and through Jesus Christ, Christian existence 
and community. The course will also include an introduction to 
issues in Luke-Acts scholarship: Luke and the synoptic tradition, 
Acts as a source for early Christianity, the genre of Luke-Acts, 
and the Lukan community. 
Offered Fall, 1983-1984 Susan Praeder 

Th 364 Biblical Methodology 

An introduction to historical, literary, and theological method in 
biblical study: source, form, and redaction criticism; literary and 
rhetorical criticism; structuralism; narrative analysis and inter- 
pretation; theological models. Assigned readings and exercises 
in the Pentateuch, Prophets, Psalms, Gospels, and Pauline epis- 
tles. 
Offered Spring, 1983-1984 Susan Praeder 

Th 365 New Testament Ethics (S; 3) 

Professor's book on love commands will be used to focus a dis- 
cussion of ethical teaching in the New Testament. The sources 
of New Testament ethical teaching in both Jewish traditions and 
the traditions of hellenistic philosophy will be studied. 

Pheme Perkins 

Th 367 The New Testament and Judaism (F; 3) 

Themes, ways of thought, practices and historical events common 
to Judaism and Christianity will be examined in the New Tes- 
tament and in New Testament sources. Study will focus on the 
origin of Judaism in Christianity, the independent development 
of each group and their characteristic ways of relating to God. 

Anthony J. Saldarini 

Th 369 The Kingdom of God in Judaism and Christianity 

Israel as people, land and kingdom is central to the Old Testament 
and the Kingdom of God is central to the Gospels. The origins 
and implications of this metaphor with its attendant ideas of 
Messiah, eschatology and apocalyptic crisis will be examined in 
primary sources and secondary literature. 
Offered Spring, 1983-1984 Anthony J. Saldarini 

Th 377 Religious Themes in Gerard Manley Hopkins (S; 3) 

Though requiring no previous familiarity with the poetry of this 
famous Jesuit convert-priest, "one of the great religious poets of 
all times," this course presents for discussion his theologically- 
based religious themes from the majesty of God to the external 
glory manifested by the creatural world. Influences on Hopkins 
by theologians and mystics like Duns Scotus, Ignatius of Loyola 
and Marie Lataste will be discussed. Miles Fay, S.J. 

Th 379 Comparative Study of Salvation Models (S; 3) 

The distinctive character of non-Western religious traditions is 
revealed in their understanding of the unsatisfactory aspects of 
the human condition and their undertaking of religious practice 
to remedy this situation and to introduce a new level of existence. 
These traditions provide a valuable comparison with Western 
salvation models, illustrating the rich diversity of human reli- 
gious experience and also the underlying goals, transformation 
processes and theological conceptions. The course will consider 
both the theology of salvation and the religious practice leading 
to it. 
Offered Spring, 1983-1984 Gerald Carney 

Th 380 Comparative Study of Scriptural Traditions: Hinduism, 
Buddhism and Islam (F; 3) 

This course is designed to supplement the student's knowledge 
of the Jewish and Christian scriptural traditions with readings 
from some other major religious traditions. Concern will center 
on the role played by scripture in the particular religion as well 
as the underlying theology of revelation and inspiration. While 
primarily based on readings from these sacred writings, the course 



106 / Arts and Sciences 

THEOLOGY 



will also treat appropriate aspects of religious life in each tradi- 
tion. 
Offered Fall, 1983-1984 Gerald Carney 

Th 381 The Buddha, Krishna and the Christ (F; 3) 

These paradigmatic religious figures characterize three distinc- 
tive approaches to the meaning of God, the relationship of the 
divine and human and the model for human life and conduct. 
The theological development of Buddhism, Hinduism and Chris- 
tianity will be studied in the context of this "comparative Chris- 
tological" approach. Gerald Carney 

Th 382 Christianity and the Encounter with World Religions 
(S;3) 

An historical and theological survey of the Christian response to 
the other major religious traditions and the parallel development 
of a specifically Christian self-consciousness. Special attention 
will be given to contemporary questions of the specific character 
of Christianity and the problem of the Christian mission in a relig- 
iously plural world. Gerald Carney 

Th 389 The Parables of Jesus 

Prerequisite: Previous introduction to the methods of New Tes- 
tament scholarship or consent of the instructor. 
Survey of recent developments in the historical and literary crit- 
ical study of the parables of Jesus, which is primarily concerned 
with the historical background to the parables and the literary 
structure of the parables of Jesus. The course centers on detailed 
analysis of the parables of Jesus preserved in the synoptic gospels 
and the Gospel of Thomas. It asks after the earliest form and 
meaning of the individual stories and the later treatment of them 
by the gospel writers. 
Offered Spring, 1983-1984 Pheme Perkins 

Th 423 Western Fathers (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 

Reading and interpretation of selected works of Latin patristic 

writers. Margaret Schatkin 

Th 425 The Greek Fathers (F; 3) 

History of the literary genres of Greek patristic literature, and se- 
lected readings from outstanding authors, with attention to style 
as well as social and intellectual context. Margaret Schatkin 

Th 434 Theology and Psychology of Relationship (F; 3) 

A study of spirituality in conjunction with the theological and 
psychological dynamics of relationship. Course design will con- 
centrate on the living consequences of faith in the life of the 
minister, patterns, crises, conversion, prayer and symbol. 

Claire Lovvery, R.S.C.J. 

Th 442 Religion in the United States 

A historical survey of the religious, theological and institutional 
developments of the major Christian and Jewish traditions in the 
United States. 
Offered Spring, 1983-1984 Thomas Wangler 

Th 444 The Reformation, 1500-1600 

This course will survey the religious controversies of the six- 
teenth century, especially the formation of the Lutheran and Cal- 
vinist traditions, and the origins of Tridentine Catholicism. 
Particular emphasis will be given to pre-Reformation reforms, 
Christian Humanism and the attempt at a "Middle way" between 
the confessions, the theological and political consolidation of the 
Lutheran confession, the theology and politics of Calvinism, the 
Catholic reform and the Counter-Reformation. 
Offered Fall, 1983-1984 James Weiss 

Th 445 Faith and Reason in the Middle Ages (S; 3) 

A study of the attitude of the Christian writers toward pagan 
literature and learning during the early Christian and medieval 
periods. Emphasis on such themes as Christ and Socrates, Athens 
and Jerusalem, and the so-called "hellenization" of Christian 
thought. Primary sources include Gregory of Nyssa, Basil, Au- 
gustine, Aquinas, Bonaventure, and Ockham. 
Offered Spring, 1983-1984 Ernest Fortin, A.A. 

Th 446 Dante and Christianity (S; 3) 

Analysis of Dante's view of Christianity and its relation to civil 
society. Investigation of new approaches to the study of the Divine 



Comedy and the basic problems that it raises. Of interest also to 
students in Political Science. Ernest Fortin, A.A. 

Th 454 Boston Catholic History (S; 3) 

A religious, institutional and social history of the Catholic Church 
in the Boston area, set in the context of American Catholic 
history. Thomas Wangler 

Th 458 Conversion in Medieval Europe (S; 3) 

This course will investigate possible answers to two questions: 
1) Why did the pagan tribes of the early Middle Ages accept 
Christianity? and 2) What was the effect of their conversion on 
the Church? We will read both documents of the period in trans- 
lation, and some of the current work of sociologists and anthro- 
pologists on the problem of conversion. 
Offered Spring, 1983-1984 Patricia DeLeeuw 

Th 474 Six Medieval Theologians I (S; 3) 

This will be a study through translated texts of six problems and 
six theologians: Abelard on the power of God, Anselm on atone- 
ment, Aquinas on the nature of theology, Bonaventure on the 
Trinity, Scotus on the natural desire for the supernatural and 
Ockham on language in theology. Stephen Brown 

Th 477 Church as State: The Development of Structures of Au- 
thority in the Medieval Church (S; 3) 

During the first 1500 years of its history the Christian community 
developed many of the features of a modern state, many of which 
endure today: a government of officials under one head, the Pope; 
a coherent body of law; and an extensive court system. This 
course will examine the foundation and growth of these insti- 
tutions in theory and practice, and the opposition they encoun- 
tered, to the time of the Protestant Reformation. 

Patricia DeLeeuw 

Th 481 Theology of the Eucharist (F; 3) 

After an introduction dealing with the Jewish background to the 
Christian Eucharist, this course will review the main stages in 
the development of theology and practice of this central Christian 
mystery-celebration. This will involve a detailed analysis of New 
Testament passages first of all; after that, the main patristic and 
medieval interpretations will be reviewed, leading into a discus- 
sion of the eucharistic debates of the Reformation period. The 
last part of the course will concentrate on the specifically Roman 
Catholic discussion of transubstantiation, on the status of the 
present-day ecumenical consensus between Roman Catholics and 
other Christians, and on the cosmic significance of the 
Eucharist. Frans Jozef van Beeck, S.J. 

Th 487 Fundamental Theology 

The foundations and principles of the theological sciences: Rev- 
elation, God, the world, man and woman. Scripture (the canon, 
inspiration, and inerrancy, biblical hermeneutics) and its rela- 
tionship to tradition. Belief. Authority. Church. Robert J. Daly, 
S.J. 

Th 489 Theology of the Eucharist 

Origins of the Eucharist in the sacrifices and sacred meals of the 
Old Testament; tradition of its institution in the New Testament 
theology of the Eucharist; theology and practice reflected in the 
major Early Christian Eucharistic Texts; the change — in apparent 
contrast to primitive Christian practice — to a progressive sacra- 
mentalization and institutionalization of the Eucharist (after the 
Old Testament model); major developments and controversies up 
to the present. The Eucharist as the life and center of the Church 
and the believing community of Christians. 
Offered Fall, 1983-1984 Robert /. Daly, S.J. 

Th 493 Modern Spiritual Writers (S; 3) 

This course will investigate the lives and spiritual writings of 
some major figures of the past one hundred years. Although other 
authors will be treated briefly, the main focus will be on the 
following writers: John Henry Newman, C. S. Lewis, Dietrich 
Bonhoeffer, Teilhard de Chardin, and Thomas Merton. 

The life and historical background and context of each of the 
authors will first be treated as well as the special influences in 
his life or writings. The particular focus, methdology, and themes 



Arts and Sciences / 107 

THEOLOGY 



of the author's spiritual writings will then be discussed. 

Charles Healey, S.J. 

Th 498 The Theology of Christian Mysticism (F; 3) 

What is the essence of Christian mysticism? Are visions, ecstasies, 
the stigmata, levitations, etc., essential elements of Christian mys- 
ticism? How is it similar or dissimilar to prophecy, shamanism, 
hallucinogenic drug experiences, etc.? These and other questions 
will be investigated through a study of the mysticism of Jesus 
Christ, Pseudo-Dionysius, Gregory of Nyssa, Catherine of Genoa, 
Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross, Bonaventure, The Cloud of 
Unknowing, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, etc. 

Harvey D. Egan, S.J. 

Th 503 On the Incarnation (F; 3) 

After a glance at the somewhat unsettled state of current thinking 
on the question "Who is Christ?" this course will endeavor to 
explore how this situation has come about and where (if any- 
where, the next move lies. The first part takes up the development 
of "classical" doctrines of Incarnation, the medieval movement 
towards a systematic understanding of this tradition, and. the 
modern dissatisfaction with both. A second part will consider 
the issues presented by historical scholarship, scientific psy- 
chology, and shift in philosophical thinking as they bear on a 
contemporary theology of the person of Christ. Charles He/ling 

Th 504 Christian Community: Theology of the Church (S; 3) 

Although it will begin historically, this course is mainly an at- 
tempt to move, systematically, beyond the type of ecclesiology 
that simply juxtaposes, on one hand, empirical descriptions of 
"the church as it is" and, on the other, traditional titles, doctrines, 
and images. Ecclesial community will be considered as a process 
of self-constitution, with particular emphasis on "doing theol- 
ogy" as an intellectual discipline that both forms and is formed 
by common Christian meanings and common Christian values. 
Some ecumenical and political implications will be drawn. 

Charles He/ling 

Th 509 Theology of Grace 

The soteriological aspects of the Arian controversy. The council 
of Carthage in 418; Pelagius; Augustine; the medieval systema- 
tization culminating in Aquinas and its trivialization in later 
Scholasticism. Rescue operations by the devotio moderna, Luther 
and Calvin, and more recent theology. 

Offered Spring, 1983-1984 Frederick Lawrence 

Th 511 On the Redemption (S; 3) 

Will work towards a systematic of Redemption (soteriology) in 
response to contemporary theology's narrative and practical ex- 
igeses by working through the history of the doctrinal develop- 
ment, attending especially to the contrasts between Anselm and 
Thomas Aquinas, before dealing with treatments such as those 
of Balthasar, Schillebeeckx and Lonergan. Frederick Lawrence 

Th 512 God in the Modern Context (F; 3) 

Discussion of the question of God in the light of the modern 
horizon as anti-metaphysical, historicist, praxis oriented, and 
threatened by nihilism. Will treat both philosophers and theo- 
logians with special attention to Newman and chapter 19 of 
Lonergan's Insight. Frederick Lawrence 

Th 514 Theology of Karl Rahner (S; 3) 

Selected readings from the writings of Karl Rahner, the "Church 
Father" of Roman Catholic Theology in the 20th century, with 
special emphasis upon his major theological themes, his theo- 
logical method, and the unity with which all theological themes 
are united. 

Offered Spring, 1983-84 Harvey D. Egan, S.J. 

Th 532 Pastoral Care and Counseling (S; 3) 

This course will examine the nature and fundamental attitudes 
of the pastoral counseling role. It will explore the development 
of the pastoral counseling profession, theories of personality de- 



velopment, counseling skills and attitudes. Special attention is 
given to a practicum experience for learning counseling skills. 

Claire Lowery, R.S.C.J. 

Th 551 Theological Ethics 

This course is especially intended for students who are pursuing 
or who intend to pursue graduate studies in theology and who 
recognize the need for an in-depth reconsideration of the nature, 
method and content of Catholic ethics. 

It will focus attention on the area of "fundamental theological 
ethics" (pursuit of the humanizing, the nature and role of objec- 
tive moral norms, the nature and function of personal conscience 
and the mystery of personal sin) as well as on the area of "special 
theological ethics" (the development of the moral agent within 
the context of the theological and moral virtues). 

By reason of its nature, this course is not open to those who 
have taken Th 284 or the equivalent. 
Offered Fall, 1983-1984 James A. O'Donohoe 

Th 553 Feminist Ethics I 

Analysis of the emerging feminist ethos as distinct from "femi- 
nine" morality defined by sexually hierarchical society. Exami- 
nation of the unholy trinity: rape, genocide, and war. The problem 
of overcoming the unholy sacrifice of women through individual 
and participatory self-actualization. Redefining "power" and 
"politics" by living on the boundary of patriarchal institutions. 
Offered Fall, 1983-84 Mary Daly 

Th 554 Feminist Ethics II 

The course will reflect upon and be part of the process of trans- 
valuating values in women's consciousness and action. It will 
consider specific problems in relation to the sexual politics of 
religion, education and the media, medicine, psychiatry, and law. 
May be taken separately from Th 553. 
Offered Spring, 1983-84 Mary Daly 

Th 557 A Feminist Critique of Selected Theological and 
Philosophical Texts I 

The course will analyze and critique selected writings of Plato, 
Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas from a woman-identified per- 
spective. 
Offered Fall, 1983-84 Mary Daly 

Th 558 A Feminist Critique of Selected Theological and 
Philosophical Texts II 

The course will analyze and critique selected modern and con- 
temporary philosophical writings from a feminist perspective. 
Included will be works of Nietzsche, Tillich, Jaspers, Bultmann, 
Camus, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty. May be taken separately from 
A Feminist Critique of Selected Theological and Philosophical 
Texts I. 
Offered Spring, 1983-84 Mary Daly 

Th 559 Sexual Ethics Within the Roman Catholic Tradition 

(F;3J 

Prerequisite: Th 284 

This course will attempt to present the main lines of the Roman 
Catholic tradition in matters involving human sexuality. Special 
attention will be given to historical factors which influenced the 
formation of the tradition and certain specific sexual problems 
will be considered from doctrinal and pastoral points of view. 

Rev. James A. O'Donohoe 

Th 564 Contemporary Issues in Theological Ethics 

To engage in current controversies in Christian ethics, partici- 
pants shall consider issues both methodological, e.g., the function 
of norms, use of Scripture; and substantive, e.g., sexuality, med- 
ical ethics, just war. 
Offered Fall, 1983-1984 Lisa Sowle Cahill 

Th 567 Christian Perspectives on Medical Ethics 

A course dealing with several problems of medical ethics which 
center on the meaning of "the sanctity of human life." These will 
include murder and suicide as classical right-to-life issues; abor- 
tion; euthanasia, definitions of death, and defective newborns; 
genetic control; informed consent to experimentation and ther- 
apy; and fetal research. Each topic will be approached from within 
the context of Christian faith and theology. The ways in which 
Christian premises influence concrete ethical decision-making 



108 / Arts and Sciences 

THEOLOGY 



will be explored through an examination of both classical and 

contemporary expressions of theological ethics. 

Offered Spring, 1983-1984 Lisa Sowle Cahill 

Th 568 Health Care Ethics: A Theological Analysis (S; 3) 

This course is not concerned with medical ethics as such. It in- 
tends to examine some of the broader issues affecting human 
health and the health care professions. Within that context, the 
course will present a consideration of some of the dimensions of 
bioethical decision making. James A. O'Donohoe 

Th 581 The Theology of Thomas Aquinas F; 3) 

A study of the main themes in Aquinas' theological synthesis: 
the nature of theology, the living God, creation, the fall, new 
creation, theological virtues, cardinal virtues, holiness, incarna- 
tion, the church, and the last things. Stephen Brown 

Th 633 (Ed 633) Psychology of Religious Development: Adult and 
Senior Years (S; 3) 

A continuation of Ed 632 which picks up the multi-perspectival 



study of the life cycle with the completion of adolescence and 
the beginning of the college years. Margaret Gorman, R. S.C.J. 



Th 658 Theology as Hermeneutical 

Offered and Research — Level III (F, S; 3, 3) 
Fall, 1983-1984 



Frederick Lawrence 



Th 699 Readings and Research— Level III (F, S; 3, 3) 

The Department 

Non-Credit Workshops 

Ed 322 Practice of Education in the Parish Context 

This workshop will explore a range of curricular programs avail- 
able in parish based religious education for children, youth and 
adults. It will also attend to the educational issues involved in 
the question of curriculum as environment. 
Spring Mary Cove 



School of 
Education 




School of Education 

The School of Education was founded in 1952 as the first co- 
educational undergraduate college on the Chestnut Hill campus. 
It is one of four undergraduate schools at Boston College and has 
as its primary mission the professional preparation of individuals 
who intend to enter the fields of education or other human serv- 
ices. Students may choose to major in Early Childhood Education, 
Elementary Education, Secondary School Education, Special Ed- 
ucation, Severe Special Education, Special Alternative Environ- 
ments, or Human Development. Many options are also offered 
within these seven majors, e.g. Bilingual Education, Computer 
Science, Gifted Child, Mathematics, Reading, Speech Science, 
Media and Fine Arts, and other areas. 

Within the Special Education program students may choose to 
major in teaching children with Moderate Special Needs. Because 
of state regulations requiring regular certification prior to en- 
dorsement as a teacher of children with Moderate Special Needs, 
students in this program will also fulfill the program requirements 
in Elementary Education. Students interested in this field are to 
declare this double major by the end of the Freshman year. Special 
Education majors may choose to enter the Special Education/ 
Alternative Environments program. This program, which does 
not lead to teacher certification, is designed for students seeking 
employment in residential or community education and occu- 
pational centers for moderately and severely handicapped indi- 
viduals. The purpose of this program is to prepare students for 
work with handicapped individuals in other than regular class- 
room settings. 

Students may also choose a program in Severe Special Needs. 
Although this program does not carry with it certification as a 
regular classroom teacher, it does prepare a person to work with 
severely handicapped individuals in separate special classes lo- 
cated in public schools, in special day schools, or in residential 
schools. It leads also to Massachusetts certification as Teacher of 
Children with Severe Special Needs. 

A Middle School Program to prepare students for teaching in 
grades six, seven, and eight is planned for the graduating class 
of 1985. 

The Secondary Program is taken in conjunction with a major 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. Currently, the student may 
follow a program in Art, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, English, 
History, Mathematics, French, or Spanish, Speech Communica- 
tion and Speech Theatre, or Theology. 

Since Massachusetts has recently revised its certification reg- 
ulations, all programs offered by the School of Education may be 
subject to revision depending upon the final interpretations of 
the State Department of Education. 

A new major in Human Development is now offered in the 
School of Education. This new program prepares students for 
further graduate study in Counseling or Educational Psychology. 
In fact, it may be considered a pre-Counseling program. It also 
prepares students for initial entry positions at the end of four 
years in various psychological and educational settings. The ten- 
course major gives a strong background in the area of Psychology. 
It is specifically designed for students who wish to work in non- 
school settings. 

The School of Education also has many distinct graduate pro- 
grams. Seniors may normally elect graduate courses in the four 
divisions: Educational Foundations, Counseling Psychology, 
Special Education, and Instructional Leadership and Adminis- 
tration. 



Academic Regulations 

All students entering the School of Education are to follow a 
program of study in selected majors and complete University core 
requirements and electives needed to fulfill degree requirements. 
A minor in the College of Arts and Sciences is also required. All 
programs lead to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Requirements for the Degree 

1.1 The requirement for the Bachelor's degree is the completion, 
with satisfactory cumulative average (at least 1.5), of at least 38 
one-semester courses (each carrying a minimum of three semes- 



School of Education /111 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



ter-hour credits), normally distributed over eight semesters of 
four academic years. 

1.2 Within the 38 courses, the following 12 courses, comprising 
the university core curriculum, are required of all students. Stu- 
dents are advised to select core courses very carefully, making 
sure they satisfy the core in each department in Arts and Sciences. 
Identification of the core courses can be determined by contacting 
the appropriate department head in Arts and Sciences and by 
reference to each semester's Schedule of Courses. Students are 
encouraged to complete core courses in the freshman and soph- 
omore years. 

2 courses in European History 

2 courses in Philosophy 

2 courses in Theology 

2 courses in either Natural Sciences or Mathematics 

2 courses in Social Sciences (including Sociology, Political 

Science, Economics, Psychology or Education) 
2 courses in English. 

1.3 A minor of four to six courses in an Arts and Sciences dis- 
cipline is required of all students in the School of Education. 
This minor should be in areas which complement the program 
in the School of Education, e.g. English, Spanish, Mathematics, 
Art, History, Psychology, etc. Minor programs need the approval 
of the Associate Dean's Office. 

1.4 The remaining courses include education major courses 
(which vary with the particular field of concentration) and elec- 
tives. Those students majoring in a liberal arts area will complete 
the same courses in their major as are required of Arts and Sci- 
ences students. 

Normal Program 

2.1 Program Distribution: The normal course load for freshmen, 
sophomores, and juniors is five (5) courses each semester; for 
seniors, four (4) courses. A freshman or sophomore who wishes 
to take only four courses may do so but must consult with the 
Associate Dean. A sixth course may be taken by students whose 
average is B (at least 2.9). A student whose average is between 
2.0 and 2.9 must obtain approval for a sixth course from the 
Associate Dean, and, as with all courses, from the department 
involved. Average is here taken to mean the student's most recent 
semester average or cumulative average, whichever is higher. Any 
sixth course must be designated as an audit or for credit when 
registering at the beginning of each semester. 

2.2 No more than eleven courses may be taken for credit in one 
year without special permission of the Associate Dean. 

2.3 Full-time status for a student in any class requires enrollment 
in at least four courses in each semester. 

2.4 Tuition shall apply per semester as published, even if the 
student carries the minimum full-time load or less. 

2.5 Acceleration: Acceleration of degree programs is possible in 
exceptional circumstances, provided Dean's approval is obtained 
at least two full semesters before early graduation and University 
policies governing acceleration are followed. 

2.6 The only courses which a student, after admission to Boston 
College, may apply toward a School of Education degree (whether 
for core, major, or total-course requirements) will be those taken 
at Boston College in a regular course of study during the academic 
year. The Office of the Associate Dean is authorized to grant 
exceptions to the provisions of this regulation for the following 
situations: 

— official cross registration programs; 

— the Junior Year Abroad Program; 

— official college exchange programs; 

— special study programs authorized by the Office of the As- 
sociate Dean 

— removal of deficiencies incurred by failure, withdrawal from 
course, or course underload; 

— subject to certain restrictions, courses in the Evening College 
of Arts and Sciences and Business Administration as ap- 
proved by the Office of the Associate Dean of Education. 

Any of the above exceptions granted must be based on prior 
written approval from the Associate Dean. 



112 / School of Education 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



Transfer into the School Of Education 

3.1 The School of Education expects that students transferring 
into it from other schools of Boston College will have a record 
free of academic deficiencies and a cumulative average of at least 
2.5 and will complete at least four semesters of full-time study 
in Education after the transfer. 

3.2 For students who have transferred from a College or Univer- 
sity other than Boston College, courses which have been granted 
transfer credit and which are similar to the offerings of Boston 
College will count toward degree requirements. 

Pass/Fail Electives 

4.1 In sophomore, junior, or senior year a student may, with the 
approval of the department offering the course, take an elective 
course or courses on a pass/fail basis. The course(s) must be in 
a department other than the one(s) in which the student is ma- 
joring; pass/fail evaluations may not be sought in core or major 
courses. A student must indicate his or her desire to take a course 
on a pass/fail basis at registration time in the office of the As- 
sociate Dean. 

4.2 No more than six (6) courses for which the final grade is 
"pass" will be counted toward a degree. 

Fulfillment of Requirements by Equivalencies 

5.1 In the following circumstances, departments may rule that 
specific degree requirements may be met by equivalencies for 
certain courses. 

5.2 A student, anytime before senior year, may be relieved of a 
core requirement without receiving credit by demonstrating, by 
means of an equivalency examination, to the chairperson of a 
department that administers courses satisfying the core require- 
ment, that he or she has mastered the content of such a course. 

5.3 In certain departments there are courses in which continua- 
tion in the second semester is intrinsically dependent upon mas- 
tering the content of the first semester. A student who fails or 
withdraws from the first semester of such a course, may, with the 
approval of the Associate Dean, be allowed to continue in the 
course and gain credit and the grade of D- for the first semester 
by passing the second semester satisfactorily (with a C+ or better 
if graded). This regulation may be applied also to Pass/Fail elec- 
tives involving a two-semester offering provided both semesters 
are taken Pass/Fail. The grade of Pass, rather than D-, will be 
awarded for the first semester in such cases. A list of departments 
and courses where these regulations apply is on file in the Office 
of the Dean of Arts & Sciences. 

Requirements for Good Standing 

6.1 In order to remain in the school, a student must maintain a 
cumulative average of C- (at least 1.5) as the minimum standard 
of scholarship and have passed at least nine courses by the be- 
ginning of the second year, nineteen by the beginning of the third 
year, and twenty-nine by the beginning of the fourth year. 

6.2 Failure to maintain good standing, either through a low cu- 
mulative average or by incurring failures and/or withdrawals, or 
by taking an underload, will result in the student's being placed 
on warning, or being required to withdraw from the School, as 
the Academic Regulations Board shall determine. Unless the stu- 
dent returns to good standing by the approved methods (see 
Course Make-Up) or should the student incur additional failures 
or withdrawals, or carry an underload, while on warning, the 
student will be required to withdraw from the School at the time 
of the next annual review. 

6.3 A student who has not passed seventeen courses after two 
years or twenty-seven after three years will be required to with- 
draw. If seven courses are not passed in one year, withdrawal 
will be required. If a student passes only one course in a semester, 
the Academic Regulations Board may require immediate with- 
drawal. 

6.4 No student may begin a given academic year in September 
with more than one deficiency. Three deficiencies within an ac- 
ademic year will mean dismissal. A deficiency is defined as a 
failure in a course, a withdrawal from a course, or an unapproved 
underload. 



Course Make-up 

7.1 A student who has failed or withdrawn from a course may 
make up the credit by passing an additional approved course 
during the regular school year or in a summer session at Boston 
College (with a grade of at least C-), or at another accredited 
four-year college (with a grade of at least C-). All make-up 
courses must be authorized by the Office of the Associate Dean 
prior to registration in them. 

7.2 To make up deficiencies, no more than two approved three- 
credit courses or their equivalent will be accepted from any one 
summer session; and no more than a total of three approved three- 
credit courses or their equivalent will be accepted from two or 
more sessions in the same summer. 

7.3 A student who has been or will be required to withdraw may 
seek approval of the Associate Dean for summer courses, and may 
thereby become eligible for consideration for reinstatement. A 
student who does not receive permission for summer courses or 
who fails to achieve creditable grades in approved summer 
courses will not be allowed to matriculate in the School of Ed- 
ucation. 

Class Attendance 

8.1 As part of their responsibility in their college experience, 
students are expected to attend classes regularly. Students who 
are absent from class or field experience will be evaluated by 
faculty responsible for the course to ascertain their ability to 
achieve the course objectives and to decide their ability to con- 
tinue in the course. 

8.2 A student who is absent from class is responsible for obtaining 
from the professor or other students, knowledge of what hap- 
pened in class, especially information about announced tests, 
papers, or other assignments. 

8.3 Professors will announce, reasonably well in advance, all tests 
and examinations based on material covered in class lectures and 
discussions, as well as on other assigned material. A student who 
is absent from class on the day of a previously announced ex- 
amination is not entitled, as a matter of right, to make up what 
was missed. The professor involved is free to decide whether a 
make-up will be allowed. 

8.4 In cases of prolonged absence, due to sickness or injury, the 
student or a family member should communicate with the Dean 
of Students and the Associate Dean of the School as soon as the 
prospect of extended absence becomes clear. The academic ar- 
rangements for the student's return to courses should be made 
with the Associate Dean of the School of Education as soon as 
the student's health and other circumstances permit. 

Professional Field Experiences 

9.1 Sophomore and junior field experiences are an essential part 
of the curriculum in the School of Education. Attendance is re- 
quired of all students assigned to cooperating school systems and 
agencies. When a student is absent, it is his or her responsibility 
to inform the school or agency and the Director of Field Expe- 
riences. 

9.2 The student-teaching experience in the senior year must be 
completed by all students seeking certification. A cumulative 
grade point average of B- (2.5) and successful completion of all 
courses leading to student teaching will be necessary for accept- 
ance. All students will be screened for eligibility and any who 
fail to meet the standards (academic, health, maturity) will be 
excluded from Student Teaching. Those so excluded will take 
courses on campus during the semester to qualify for a degree 
from Boston College, but not for recommendation as future teach- 
ers. No student will be allowed to overload while taking Student 
Teaching. 

9.3 Experiences in schools and agencies are a vital part of the 
curriculum in the School of Education. The facilities utilized for 
these experiences are located in Boston and neighboring areas. 
Students are responsible for providing for their own transporta- 
tion to and from these facilities. 

International, Out-of-State Program for 
Undergraduate Studies 

9.4 The School of Education's International and Out-of-State Pro- 



\ 



gram offers undergraduate classroom and research opportunities 
in a variety of foreign countries and out-of-state settings. Inter- 
national settings include classrooms in such countries as Switz- 
erland, Ireland, Great Britain, Scotland, and Australia. Out-of- 
State settings provide opportunities to work on Indian reserva- 
tions in Montana and New Mexico, rural schools in Vermont, the 
mid-west, or schools in Colorado and California. For information 
regarding course work and requirements, contact the Program 
Director for International/National Programs, School of Educa- 
tion, Campion 115, Boston College. 

Leave Of Absence 

10.1 A student in good standing who desires to interrupt the 
normal progress of an academic program and to resume studies 
at Boston College within a year may petition for a leave of absence. 
The process begins in the Office of the University Registrar (Lyons 
101). A leave of absence will not normally be granted to students 
who expect to do full-time academic work at other institutions 
and will be extended for no more than one year, although petition 
for renewal is possible. 

Academic Integrity 

11.1 Students at Boston College are expected to have high stan- 
dards of integrity. Any student who cheats or plagiarizes on ex- 
aminations or assignments is subject to dismissal from the 
College. Cases involving academic integrity shall be referred to 
the Dean's Office for adjudication. 

Grade Change 

12.1 In exceptional circumstances, a grade change may be war- 
ranted. All such grade changes must be submitted for approval 
to the Associate Dean's Office no later than six weeks after the 
beginning of the semester following that in which the course was 
initiated. This rule applies also to those grade changes that result 
from the completion of course work in cases where an extension 
was given to a student by a professor to finish the work after the 
end of the semester in which the course was initiated. 

Degree With Honors 

13.1 Honors accompanying the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science are awarded in three grades according to the 
cumulative average attained by full-time attendance: Summa cum 
Laude, with Highest Honors, is awarded to students with a cu- 
mulative average of 3.667 or above; Magna cum Laude, with High 
Honors, to those with averages between 3.333 and 3.666; and 
Cum Laude, with Honors, to those with averages between 2.900 
and 3.332. Beginning with the Class of 1983 Honors will be 
awarded on a percentage basis. The degree will be awarded 
Summa cum Laude to the top 4.5% of the graduating class, Magna 
cum Laude to the next 9.5% and Cum Laude to the next 15%. 



Awards and Honors 

General Excellence Award: An award presented by the Boston 
College School of Education to a senior who qualifies for a teach- 
ing certificate and has at the same time manifested outstanding 
achievement in all courses of study during four academic years. 
The Blessed Edmund Campion Award: An award presented by 
the Boston College School of Education for excellence in an ac- 
ademic major. 

The Dr. Marie M. Gearan Award: An award presented in honor 
of Professor Gearan, a member of the original faculty and the first 
Director of Student Teaching, to a member of the senior class for 
outstanding academic achievement, campus leadership, and dis- 
tinguished success as a student teacher. 

The Blessed Richard Gwyn Award: An award presented by the 
Boston College School of Education to a member of the senior 
class for outstanding promise as a secondary teacher. 
The Rev. Henry P. Wennerberg, S.J. Award: An award presented 
in Honor of Father Wennerberg, S.J., the first spiritual counselor 
in the School of Education, to a member of the senior class who 
is outstanding for participation and leadership in school and cam- 
pus activities. 



School of Education / 113 

MAJOR FIELDS 



The John /. Cardinal Wright Award: A good teacher is one who 
is dedicated to the art of motivating his or her students to learn. 
This award, in honor of His Excellency John J. Cardinal Wright, 
is presented to that senior who has shown expert use of his or 
her creativity and imagination in the area of motivation, and at 
the same time dedicated himself or herself to high educational 
ideals. 

The John A. Schmitt Award: An award presented to a member 
of the senior class who, like Professor Schmitt, has consistently 
demonstrated compassion for his fellow man, integrity in his 
dealings with others, diligence in his profession, and courage in 
the pursuit of what he believes to be right. 

The Mr. and Mrs. Vincent P. Roberts Award: An award presented 
to a member of the senior class who is distinguished for loyalty 
to the ideals and purposes of the School of Education. 
The Council for Exceptional Children Award: An award pre- 
sented to a man in the senior class — a member of the Boston 
College Chapter of the Council for Exceptional Children — for 
demonstration of unusual service to the care and education of 
handicapped children. 

The Council for Exceptional Children Award: An award pre- 
sented to a woman in the senior class — a member of the Boston 
College Chapter of the Council for Exceptional Children — for 
demonstration of unusual service to the care and education of 
handicapped children. 

The Charles F. Donovan, S.J., Award: This award is presented to 
a member of the Junior Class in honor of Charles F. Donovan, S.J., 
founding Dean of the School of Education. Selected by the mem- 
bers of the class, the recipient of this award exhibits superior 
leadership, academic, and innovative qualities; demonstrates ex- 
cellence in professional and personal commitment, and has a 
genuine concern for the needs and values of others. 
The Rev. James F. Moynihan, S.J. Award: This award is presented 
by the Boston College School of Education in honor of James F. 
Moynihan, S.J., first Chairman of the Psychology Department and 
Professor of Counseling Psychology in Education for many years. 
The award is given to a student in the Human Development Pro- 
gram who has shown superior scholarship, contributed creatively 
to the well-being of others, and manifested dedication and com- 
mitment to the enhancement of the human development process. 



MAJORS IN EDUCATION 



Major in Early Childhood Education 

The major in Early Childhood Education prepares students for 
teaching normal and mildly handicapped children in regular set- 
tings in kindergarten through grade tbree, in nursery schools, and 
in early intervention programs. The program sponsors two dem- 
onstration Piagetian-based preschools, both available to students 
for developing teaching competencies. Some aspects of this pro- 
gram may also be taken as a minor or a concentration. 

Education Course Requirements for the Early Childhood 
Major are: 

FRESHMAN University Core Requirements 
Child Growth 



SOPHOMORE 



JUNIOR 



SENIOR 



University Core Requirements 

Psychology of Learning 

Early Childhood Development and Learning 

Introduction to Children with Special Needs 

Educational Measurement 

Curriculum and Models in Early Childhood 

Methods and Materials in Early Childhood 

Education 

Exploring Science and Social Studies 

Mathematics for Teachers 

Reading and Language Arts in Early Years 

Student Teaching: Early Childhood 
Family, School, and Community Relations 
Philosophy of Education 



114 / School of Education 

MAJOR FIELDS 

Major in Elementary Education 

The major in Elementary Education prepares students for teach- 
ing normal and mildly handicapped children in regular settings 
in grade one through grade six. 

In addition to the mastery of program content, students are 
instructed in the organizational practices of the elementary class- 
room and the management strategies utilized with children at the 
elementary level. Students develop competencies in diagnostic/ 
prescriptive teaching which will allow them to develop programs 
for children at all levels of ability. Integrated into this program 
is instruction in the competencies which will enable students to 
effectively mainstream mildly handicapped children into the reg- 
ular classroom. 

The field component accompanying the program provides op- 
portunities for students to work with children in both the regular 
classroom and the resource room. 

Students are advised to pursue an area of concentration along 
with the regular elementary program. 

Education Course Requirements for the Elementary Major 
are: 



FRESHMAN 



SOPHOMORE 



JUNIOR 



SENIOR 



University Core Requirements 
Child Growth 

University Core Requirements 

Teaching Reading 

Educational Measurement 

Psychology of Learning 

Introduction to Children with Special Needs 

Teaching Language Arts 
Teaching Social Studies 
Teaching Mathematics 
Teaching Science and Health 
Teaching Music, Art, and Movement 

Student Teaching 
Philosophy of Education 
Electives 



Major in Middle-School Education 

This program prepares students for certification as Middle-School 
Teacher. The Middle-School Teacher is a new designation in the 
"Regulations for the Certification of Educational Personnel", 
Massachusetts Board of Education, 1979. These regulations take 
effect September, 1982. 

This program is for those students who will be doing their 
senior practicum within the span of grades 5-9, and whose career 
goal is to teach in either a middle or junior high school. Middle 
schools usually include either grades 5-8 or 6-8, while junior 
high schools usually include grades 7—8 or 7-9. 

Requirements: 

A student must complete a minimum of 36 semester hours of 
course work in the subject-matter fields of middle-school edu- 
cation. These are defined as Reading, Oral and Written Com- 
munication, Literature, Mathematics, Biological and Physical 
Sciences, Social Studies, the Arts, and Health and Physical Ed- 
ucation. At least one of these fields must amount to a college 
minor (18 credits), but it is to one's advantage to have a second 
teaching field at approximately the same depth of learning. A 
student can choose to develop a minor from the following 
fields-Mathematics, Biological and Physical Sciences, Reading, 
Language Arts, Social Studies. 

A student must complete a pre-practicum of 21 semester hours 
of course work and experiences. Three of these courses have a 
field component. 

A student must complete the university core. In selecting 
courses for the core, one should keep in mind the subject-matter 
fields of middle-school education, because certain courses can 
serve both requirements. Core requirements should be completed 
by the end of the sophomore year. 

A student must complete a successful Middle-School Senior 
Practicum. 



Fields of Study which typically comprise the Major in Middle- 
School Education: 



FRESHMAN 



SOPHOMORE 



JUNIOR 



SENIOR 



English 
Mathematics 

or 
Natural Sciences 
History 
Philosophy 
Theology 
Child Growth 

Introduction to Teaching in the Middle-School 

Adolescent Psychology 

Health 

The Arts 

Reading 

College Minor/s 

Educational Measurement 

Composition 

Speech Communication 

Study of Children with Special Needs 

Structure and Methodology of Teaching Fields 

The Arts 

College Minor/s 

Electives 

Middle-School Curiculum 
Middle-School Senior Practicum 
Philosophy of Education 
Electives 



Contemporary issues important to the middle-school teacher 
are examined through special presentations and seminars. 
Students may apply for this program to Dr. William Max Griffin. 



Major in Secondary Education 

The major in Secondary Education prepares students for teaching 
in senior high schools, grades nine to twelve. The field-experience 
component which is offered during the junior and senior years 
is an integral part of the professional course work. The major in 
Secondary Education will benefit those students who are inter- 
ested in gaining certification as a teacher, who want to achieve 
an in-depth major in a discipline, and who want to apply elective 
courses to enhance the major and professional course work. Bos- 
ton College has, as its goal, the preparation and development of 
teacher-scholars, the educational leaders of the future. 
Students may prepare in the following disciplines: 



Art 



Mathematics 



Biology French 

Chemistry Spanish 

Physics Speech Communication 

English Speech Theatre 

History Theology 

Courses in a discipline are taken in the appropriate departments 
and requirements may be found in this bulletin under the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

Application to the program is made during the sophomore year 
to Dr. Bonnie Lass. 

Education Course Requirements for the Secondary Major are: 



FRESHMAN 
SOPHOMORE 



University Core Requirements 

Secondary Speech Communications* 
Educational Psychology and the Adolescent 
University Core Requirements 
Major Courses in Discipline 
Electives 



School of Education / 115 

MAJOR FIELDS 



JUNIOR Special Methods** 

Educational Measurement 

Learning Problems of Special Needs 

Adolescents** 

Major Courses in Discipline 

Electives 

SENIOR Philosophy of Education 

Student Teaching 
Major Courses in Discipline 
Electives 

*This first course is listed also under the Department of Speech 
Communication and Theatre. 

**With these two courses there is a one-credit lab which must 
be taken. The lab consists of observation in an assigned secondary 
school. 

Suggested electives are: Psychological Foundations in Education, 
Media and Curriculum, Reading Instruction in the Secondary 
School, Legal Aspects of Teachers and Students, Problems and 
Issues with Administration of Public Schools, Introduction to 
Computer Programming, Introduction to Curriculum, Sex Edu- 
cation and Drug Abuse, Problems in Urban Education. 
Students majoring in English have additional requirements; they 
should consult their advisor or the Associate Dean. 
Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may elect this pro- 
gram as a six-course minor. 



Major in Human Development 

The major consists of offerings in the Divisions of Counseling and 
Foundations. It provides a basic foundation for further graduate 
study in Counseling or Educational Psychology. For the student 
who does not plan on graduate studies the major will prepare for 
employment in such settings as child/adult residential or day care 
facilities, support personnel in offices of senior professional psy- 
chologists and counselors, and experimental educational settings. 
This major does not provide for state certification as a classroom 
teacher; it is not recommended as preparation for in-school set- 
tings. 

Education Course requirements for the Human Development 
Major are: 

FRESHMAN University Core Requirements 
Child Growth 



SOPHOMORE 



JUNIOR 



Educational Measurement 
Psychology of Learning 
Adolescent Psychology 
Interpersonal Relations 



Personality Theories 
Abnormal Psychology 
Adult Psychology 

SENIOR Counseling Theories 

Students may elect two courses from the following, or other ap- 
proved courses: 

Psychology of the Exceptional Child 

Early Childhood Development 

Children's Literature 

Human Development Senior Field Experience 

Practicum in Outdoor Education 

Psychology of the Gifted 

Management of the Behavior of Severe Special Needs Students 

Working with Parents of Severe Special Needs Students 

Ten courses are required for the major. 



Major in Moderate Special Needs 

This program prepares students to teach moderately handicapped 
children in regular classrooms, resource centers, and in other 
special education settings. Students who wish to be certified as 
teachers of the moderately handicapped in Massachusetts must 
concurrently pursue the elementary education program. This en- 
ables the student to be certified as an elementary teacher as well 



as a teacher of the moderately handicapped. Those who plan to 
teach in other states should check the certification standards for 
the states where they plan to seek employment to determine if 
elementary education certification is required. These students 
should discuss such requirements with their faculty advisor. 

Education Course requirements for the major in Moderate 
Special Needs are: 

FRESHMAN 



SOPHOMORE 



JUNIOR 



SENIOR 



University Core Requirements 
Child Growth 

University Core Requirements 

Teaching Reading 

Habilitation of Children with Special Needs 

Educational Measurement 

Psychology of Learning 

Introduction to Children with Special Needs 

Electives 

Teaching Language Arts 

Teaching Social Studies 

Teaching Mathematics 

Teaching Science and Health 

Teaching Art, Music, and Movement 

Classroom Management: Children with Special 

Needs 

Educational Strategies for Children with 

Special Needs 

Educational Assessment for Children with 

Special Needs 

Student Teaching: Elementary 
Philosophy of Education 
Introduction to Speech and Language 
Disorders 
Electives 



Major in Severe Special Needs 

This program is designed for students who desire to work with 
severely handicapped individuals in separate special classes lo- 
cated in public schools, in special day schools, or in residential 
schools. It provides a clinical grounding in handicapping con- 
ditions, a rationale for planning educational interventions, and 
skills in communicating and working effectively with parents of 
handicapped individuals. Course work and field work during 
sophomore and junior years are followed by a full semester of 
student teaching in the senior year. Graduates of this program 
may receive Massachusetts certification as Teacher of Children 
with Severe Special Needs. This type of certification differs from 
that needed for teaching in a regular classroom. 

Education course requirements for the Severe Special Needs 
Major are: 

FRESHMAN 



SOPHOMORE 



JUNIOR 



SENIOR 



Child Growth 

University Core Requirements 

Introduction to Children with Special Needs 
Habilitation of Children with Special Needs 
Psychology of Learning 
Educational Measurement 

Human Development and Handicapping 

Conditions 

Management Behavior for Severe Special 

Needs 

Working with Parents 

Introduction to Developmental Reading 

Assessment: Severe Special Needs 

Introduction to Speech and Language 

Disorders 

Educational Strategies: Severe Special Needs 

Adapted Physical Education: Severe Special 

Needs 

Student Teaching: Severe Special Needs 
Seminar: Severe Special Needs 



116 / School of Education 

MAJOR FIELDS 



Major in Special Alternative Environments 

This program is for students who plan to work in residential, 
educational and occupational centers for moderately and severely 
handicapped people. Since this program is to prepare students 
for work with handicapped individuals in learning situations 
other than public or private classroom settings, it does not purport 
to meet teaching certification requirements needed for those set- 
tings. 

The freshman and sophomore course requirements for this pro- 
gram are the same as those required for students enrolled in the 
Moderate Special Needs program. Requirements for the junior 
and senior years are as follows: 

JUNIOR Occupational Preparatory Skills 

Independent Living Skills 
Classroom Management: Children With 
Special Needs 

Education Strategies for Children With Special 
Needs 

Educational Assessment of Children With 
Special Needs 
Electives (Approved by Advisor) 

SENIOR Internship in Alternative Environments 

Research Seminar in Major 
Intro, to Speech and Language Disorders 
Electives 

The above listing includes four electives which will be selected 
with the counsel of the program coordinator or other designated 
faculty members. 



Major in Early Childhood and Special 
Education 

This program prepares students to teach moderately handicapped 
children in regular classrooms grades kindergarten through three, 
resource centers, and in other special education settings in Mas- 
sachusetts. Students who plan to teach in other states should 
check the certification standards of those states to determine 
whether an elementary education certificate (grades one through 
six) is required. These students should discuss such requirements 
with their faculty advisor. 

Educational course requirements for the major in Early 
Childhood/Special Education are: 

FRESHMAN University Core Requirements 
Child Growth 

University Core Requirements 

Educational Measurement 

Psychology of Learning 

Habilitation of Individuals with Special Needs 

Early Childhood Development and Learning 

Curriculum and Models in Early Childhood 

Education 

Introduction to Children with Special Needs 

Methods and Materials in Early Childhood 

Education 

Exploring Science and Social Studies 

Mathematics for Teachers 

Reading and Language Arts in the Early Years: 

Preschool through Third Grade 

Classroom Management: Children with Special 

Needs 

Educational Assessment for Children with 

Special Needs 

Educational Strategies for Children with 

Special Needs 

Philosophy of Education 

Introduction to Speech and Language 

Disorders 

Family, School, and Community Relations 

Student Teaching: Early Childhood 



SOPHOMORE 



JUNIOR 



SENIOR 



Student Teaching: Special Education 
Electives 

Fifth Year Programs 

In Special Education the superior student may plan undergrad- 
uate studies so as to begin graduate work in the senior year. This 
may enable a student to graduate with the bachelor's degree and 
the master's degree in five years. 

These programs include preparation of personnel to work with 
children who are multihandicapped (including deaf-blind), blind 
or visually handicapped, or severely mentally retarded or emo- 
tionally disturbed. Those in the Blind and Visually Handicapped 
program have extended preparation in teaching orientation and 
mobility beyond that required for certification as a teacher of the 
blind and visually handicapped. Those preparing as specialists 
in the field of mental retardation or emotional disturbance not 
only fulfill the certification requirements of the field but acquire 
in depth knowledge and experiences which broadens the scope 
of their professional service possibilities. 

Also included in these programs is the opportunity to be profes- 
sionally prepared in the field of rehabilitation working with blind 
and visually handicapped youth and adults as Rehabilitation 
Teachers and as Peripatologists (teachers of orientation and mo- 
bility). 

Currently there is a great demand for personnel with the profes- 
sional preparation made possible in these Five Year Programs. 
Students interested in a fifth year program should consult with 
the appropriate coordinator. At present there is limited Federal 
financial assistance for each of these programs. 



Minors and Concentrations in Education 

With the exception of the minor of four to six courses in a single 
Arts and Sciences subject, all minors and concentrations are elec- 
tives. Students may enroll in one, two, three, or more courses. 
Minors are defined as four to six courses; concentrations as two 
or more courses. 

Minor in Arts and Sciences 

Beginning with the graduating Class of 1983, students in the 
School of Education are required to carry a minor of four to six 
courses in a single subject in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
The minimum acceptable is four courses, and Core courses may 
be included. Specific acceptable areas of study are: Art History, 
Studio Art, Biology, Chemistry, Classics, Economics, English, 
Geology, Germanic Studies, History, Linguistics, Mathematics, 
Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Span- 
ish, French, Italian, Russian, Sociology, Speech, and Theatre. 
Students are encouraged and advised to carry six courses or eight- 
een credit hours. Secondary Education majors and others who 
major in Arts and Sciences thereby fulfill this requirement. 

Minor in Secondary Education 

Students majoring in Art, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, English, 
History, Mathematics, French, Spanish, Speech Communication 
and Theatre, or Theology in the College of Arts and Sciences may 
apply to minor in Education. This program begins in the junior 
year and interested students should contact the Coordinator of 
Secondary Education or the Associate Dean in the School of Ed- 
ucation during the first semester in the sophomore year. Only 
those students majoring in the disciplines listed above may apply 
for a minor in Education. Students majoring in English have ad- 
ditional requirements. Consult the Secondary Handbook and the 
advisor for these requirements. 

Minor in Middle-School Education 

The program in Middle-School Education is designed for students 
in the College of Arts and Sciences and for transfer students in 
the School of Education who wish to prepare for teaching during 
their junior and senior years. It is for those students who will 
have upon graduation an academic major in one of the following 
fields: 

English 
History 






School of Education / 117 

MAJOR FIELDS 



Mathematics 
Biology 
Physics 
Chemistry 

It is for those students whose career goal is to teach in either 
a middle or junior high school. Middle schools usually include 
either grades 5-8 or 6—8, while junor high schools usually include 
grades 7-8 or 7-9. 

Requirements: 

A student must have a minimum of 24 semester hours of course 
work in the subject-matter fields of middle school education. 
These are defined as Reading, Oral and Written Communication, 
Literature, Mathematics, Biological and Physical Sciences, Social 
Studies, the Arts, and Health and Physical Education. Usually 
this is accomplished through the university core together with 
purposeful selection of electives in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences. 

A student must complete a pre-practicum of 15 semester hours 
and experiences. Three of these courses have a field component. 

A student must complete a successful middle-school senior 
practicum. 

The following courses comprise the Middle-School Minor and 
should be taken during the junior and senior years as follows: 



JUNIOR 
SENIOR 



Adolescent Psychology 

Introduction to Teaching in the Middle-School 

Structure and Methodology of Teaching Field 
Educational Measurement 
Middle-School Curriculum 
Middle-School Senior Practicum 



Contemporary issues important to the middle-school teacher 
are examined through special presentations and seminars. 

Application to the program is made prior to the junior year to 
the Director of the program — Dr. William Max Griffin. 

Minor in Health Education 

This program is designed to acquaint students with viable alter- 
natives for careers in the health field. The minor is open to stu- 
dents in Education, Nursing, Management, and Arts and Sciences. 
It involves the following courses: 

Anatomy & Physiology 

Sex Education 

Health Education, Planning & Diagnosis 

Critical Issues: Wellness & Health Education 

Alcohol and Drug Abuse 

Electives 

Student interested in this program should contact Theresa A. 
Powell. 

Minor in Speech Science 

This concentration in Speech Science (Speech Pathology) pre- 
pares students for graduate study at the Master's level in Speech 
Science and as regular elementary or secondary classroom teach- 
ers. Students interested in this specialization should follow a 
major in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Sec- 
ondary Education, or Human Development. 

SOPHOMORE Introduction to Speech Pathology 
Phonetics 



JUNIOR 



SENIOR 



Language Acquisition 

Anatomy and Physiology of the Vocal 

Mechanism 

Diagnostic Procedures 

Articulation: Theories and Therapies 

Audiology I 
Clinical Methods 
Clinical Practice 



Students in this concentration need a 3.0 grade point average by 
the end of sophomore year in order to continue. 



Concentration in Bilingual Education 

The specialization in Elementary-Bilingual Education prepares 
students to teach in elementary schools with bilingual settings 
in Spanish. Students interested in this specialization should en- 
roll in one Spanish course each semester, beginning in the first 
semester of freshman year. The sequence of Spanish courses is 
as follows: 

Intermediate Spanish 

Composition, Conversation, Readings in Spanish 

Spanish Phonetics 

Advanced Spanish Conversation 

Advanced Spanish Composition and Introduction 

to Literary Analysis 
Cultural Backgrounds in Spanish Literature 
A Conversational Approach to Contemporary Spanish 
A Conversational Approach to Latin America 

Students with four years of high school Spanish may test out 
of Intermediate Spanish. All of the above courses are not nec- 
essary, but the courses should be taken in order and with the 
advisor's approval. 

The required courses in Education are as follows: 

Caribbean History and Culture 
Methods in Bilingual Education 

Child Growth and Philosophy of Education are part of the el- 
ementary program. This specialization will lead to state (Mas- 
sachusetts) certification in Elementary and Bilingual Education 
as long as the student takes the proficiency examination from the 
Bureau of Bilingual Education. Applicants should contact that 
office for information about the process. 

Contact Dr. Joan Jones for further information on this special- 
ization. 

Concentration in Early Childhood Education 

This concentration in Early Childhood Education is designed for 
students who wish to teach first grade through sixth grade, but 
have a primary interest in the lower grades, and thus wish to 
develop expertise in this area. It should be noted that this con- 
centration will not enable students to teach at the kindergarten 
level in Massachusetts since they will be receiving Elementary 
School certification, not Early Childhood certification. It is ad- 
visable to combine this concentration with a second concentra- 
tion in Reading or Education of the Gifted. 

SOPHOMORE Early Childhood Development and Learning 
Curriculum and Models in Early Childhood 
Education 

Methods and Materials in Early Childhood 
Education 

Beginning Reading and Language Arts, or 
Quantitative Skill Development for Young 
Children, or Family, School and Community 
Relations 

Concentration in Computer Usage in Education 

The School of Education offers a concentration and a minor in 
computer usage in education. The concentration involves a se- 
quence of three courses while the minor involves those three 
courses plus an additional three related courses. The concentra- 
tion is designed to allow students to learn how computers are 
used in education, to have skills in three computer languages and 
to experience the usage of computers for a variety of educational 
purposes. The minor is expected to provide students with a 
greater depth of experience with educational computing so that 
they could consider careers which would involve computing. 

The minor is offered to students who are majoring in elemen- 
tary or secondary education. Students interested in this minor 
are to complete the appropriate major plus: 

Introduction to Computers in Education 

Computer Programming 

Computer Assisted Instruction and Measurement 

With the advice of the faculty advisor for this program, students 
must select three additional courses related to computing. 



JUNIOR 



SENIOR 



118 / School of Education 

FACULTY 



ADDITIONAL MINOR PROGRAMS: There also exists a minor 
concentration in science, business, and related subjects. These 
additional programs may be approved by the Associate Dean. 

Concentration in the Education of the Gifted 

In response to a growing need for teachers who are prepared to 
perform in a variety of educational settings for the gifted, partic- 
ularly the regular classroom, the School of Education is offering 
a concentration of courses and field experiences. 

The concentration is offered to juniors and seniors who have 
at least a B average and are majoring in elementary, secondary, 
or special education. The following courses are offered. 

Psychology of the Gifted 

Humanistic Education 

Teaching the Gifted 

Psychology and Education of Creative People 

Field placement in educational settings for the gifted will be 
arranged for juniors and seniors. Students should apply to Dr. 
Katharine Cotter. 

Concentration in Mathematics Education 

The Mathematics Education Concentration is designed for pre- 
service elementary education majors who want to increase their 
potential effectiveness as classroom teachers of mathematics, who 
want to work with children who have special needs in the area 
of mathematics, who want to be mathematics specialists in an 
elementary school, or who want to run a mathematics resource 
room in an elementary school. 

Students interested in this specialization are to complete an 
elementary major plus: 



FRESHMAN 



Mathematics for Teachers 
(or its equivalent) 



Students are to elect three courses from the following: 
Number Theory for Teachers 
Geometry for Teachers 
Quantitative Skill Development: Preschool 

through Grade Three 
Games and Activities for Arithmetic and 

Measurement Skill Development 
The Special Needs Child: Arithmetic and 

Measurement Skills 
Independent Study: The Running of a 
Mathematics Education Resource Center 

Independent study with a selected faculty member or mathe- 
matics specialist can also be arranged. Contact Dr. Michael Schiro 
for further information. 

Concentration in Media and the Fine Arts 

The concentration of courses in Media and The Fine Arts prepares 
teachers in the use of a wide variety of materials in the classroom. 
It allows them to draw on the talents of students for creative 
expression in many forms. The specialization deals with topics 
such as art history and appreciation, still photography, film-mak- 
ing, painting, and television production. The student will have 
the opportunity to develop skills in various modes of visual 
expression. The skills can be applied to any communication sit- 
uation. 

The concentration is offered to students who are majoring in 
elementary or secondary education. Students interested in this 
concentration are to complete the appropriate major plus: 

Media and the Curriculum (Ed 148) 
Introduction to Art History (Fa 101 and 102) 
Foundations of Studio Art (Fs 101 and 102) 

Students are encouraged to select additional courses from the 
following list, or as the advisor directs, in order to develop skills 
in specific modes of creative expression: 

Basic Film-making (Fs 171 and 172) 
Introduction to Principles and Techniques of 

Photography (Ph 301) 
Intermediate Photography (Fs 261) 



Television: An Introductory Course (Sa 322) 
The Propaganda Film (Fa 381) 
Film Criticism (Fa 482) 

Additional course selections can be made from the offerings of 
the School of Education and the Department of Fine Arts with 
the recommendation of the program advisor and the chairperson 
of the Department of Fine Arts. Contact Dr. Fred Pula or Dr. 
Marianne Martin for further information. 

Concentration in Reading 

The Reading concentration is designed for pre-service elementary 
education majors who want to increase their potential effective- 
ness as classroom reading teachers. Students may opt for the 
Reading concentration after successful completion (grades of B 
or better) of Ed 101, Elementary Language Arts and Ed 104, Read- 
ing Methods. It is recommended that the student take Ed 101 and 
Ed 104 during the first semester, sophomore year. 

Students interested in this specialization are to complete an 
elementary major and three of the following: 

Children's Literature 

Diagnostic and Remedial Reading 

Primary Reading and Language Arts 

Language and the Language Arts 

Reading Instruction in the Secondary School 

In addition to these offerings, other courses may be chosen after 
consultation with the coordinator. Independent study with a se- 
lected faculty member or reading specialist can also be arranged. 
Contact Dr. Bonnie Lass for further information. 



Faculty 

Professor Peter W. Airasian, A.B., Harvard University; A.M., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 

Professor Michael H. Anello, B.S., Seton Hall University; A.M., 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

Professor Katherine C. Cotter, B.S., Hyannis State Teachers Col- 
lege; M.Ed., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Professor John S. Dacey, A.B., Harpur College; M.Ed., Ph.D., Cor- 
nell University 

Professor Donald T. Donley, B.S., State University of New York at 
Buffalo; D.Ed., Syracuse University 

Professor John R. Eichorn, B.S., Salem State Teachers College; 
M.Ed., D.Ed., Boston University 

Professor Francis J. Kelly, A.B., Boston College; A.M., Columbia 
University; D.Ed., Harvard University 

Professor Mary T. Kinnane, A.B., H. Dip. Ed., Liverpool University; 
A.M., University of Kansas; Ph.D., Boston College 

Professor George T. Ladd, B.S., State University College at Oswego, 
New York; M.A.T., D.Ed., Indiana University 

Professor Pierre D. Lambert, B.S., M.Ed., Boston College; Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa 

Professor George F. Madaus, B.S., College of the Holy Cross; M.Ed., 
State College of Worcester; D.Ed., Boston College 

Professor Vincent C. Nuccio, A.B., Boston College; M.E., D.Ed., 
Cornell University 

Professor Ronald L. Nuttall, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor Edward J. Power, A.B., St. John's University (Minnesota); 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Professor Lester E. Przewlocki, A.B., M.A., DePaul University; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Professor John Savage, A.B., Iona College; Ed.D., Boston University 

Professor John F. Travers, Jr., B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., Boston College 

Professor John J. Walsh, B.S., Boston College; A.M., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago 



School of Education / 119 

COURSE OFFERINGS 



Associate Professor Lillian Buckley, B.S., Framingham State Col- 
lege; Ed.M., Ed.D., Boston University 

Associate Professor M. Beth Casey, A.B., University of Michigan; 
A.M., Ph.D., Brown University 

Associate Professor James J. Cremins, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University 
of Connecticut 

Associate Professor William M. Griffin, A.B., Marietta College; 
A.M., State College for Teachers at Albany; D.Ed., Syracuse Uni- 
versity 

Associate Professor Irving Hurwitz, A.B., Ph.D., Clark University 

Associate Professor Richard M. Jackson, A.B., American Interna- 
tional College; Ed.M., Harvard University; Ed.D., Columbia Uni- 
versity 

Associate Professor John A. Jensen, A.B., Cornell University; A.M., 
Ed.D., University of Rochester 

Associate Professor Joan C. Jones, B.S., Northwest Missouri State 
Teachers College; M.Ed., University of Missouri; Ed.D., Boston 
University 

Associate Professor John B. Junkala, B.S., State College of Fitch- 
burg; M.Ed., Boston University; D.Ed., Syracuse University 

Associate Professor William K. Kilpatrick, B.S., Holy Cross College; 
A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., Purdue University 

Associate Professor Raymond J. Martin, A.B., Iowa State Teachers 
College; M.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa 

Associate Professor Jean Mooney, A.B., Smith College; A.M., Stan- 
ford University; Ph.D., Boston College 

Associate Professor Bernard A. O'Brien, A.B., Boston College; A.M., 
Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

Associate Professor Diana P. Paolitto, A.B., Smith College; M.A.T., 
Harvard University; Ed.D., Boston University 

Associate Professor Alec F. Peck, A.B., University of San Francisco; 
M.S., Ph.D., Penn. State University 

Associate Professor Michael Schiro, B.S., Tufts University; M.A.T., 
D.Ed., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Charles F. Smith, Jr., B.S.Ed., Bowling Green 
State University; M.S., Kent State University; C.A.S., Harvard 
University; Ed.D., Michigan State University 

Associate Professor Kenneth W. Wegner, B.S., M.Ed., D.Ed., Uni- 
versity of Kansas 

Assistant Professor Mary M. Brabeck, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., University 
of Minnesota 

Assistant Professor Marcia Bromfield, A.B., Tufts University; M.S., 
Syracuse University; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Assistant Professor Sherrill Butterfield, B.S., Fitchburg State Col- 
lege; M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Assistant Professor Joseph Duffy, S.J., A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
S.T.L., Weston College; M.S.Ed., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Assistant Professor Bonnie Lass, A.B., Syracuse University; M.S., 
CCNY; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Assistant Professor Theresa Powell, Diploma, Posse School of 
Physical Education; B.S., Ed.M., Boston University 

Assistant Professor Harry J. Sobel, B.A., LeHigh University; M.S., 
Purdue University; Ph.D., Boston College 

Assistant Professor Elizabeth R. Welfel, A.B., Emmanuel College; 
A.M., Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Philip DiMattia, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., 
Boston College 

Adjunct Lecturer Michael E. Herron, B.S., California State Univer- 
sity at Northridge; A.M., California State University at Los An- 
geles 

Adjunct Lecturer W. Robert Smith, B.S., Northern Illinois Univer- 
sity 



Adjunct Lecturer Hugo Vigoroso, B.S., University of Rhode Island; 
M.Ed., Boston College 

Lecturer George Zimmerman, B.S., Kutztown State College; A.M., 
Western Michigan University 



Course Offerings 

Ed 030 Child Growth (F, S; 3) 

Learning theory, cognitive development and physical and psy- 
chological patterns of growth for the typical child are among the 
major topics examined. The Department 

Ed 031 Child Growth (S; 3) 

This advanced course treats special topics which were introduced 
in the first course. Prerequisite: Ed 030. The Department 

Ed 032 Psychology of Learning (F, S; 3) 

An investigation of the learning process with particular emphasis 
upon the nature of learning, development of definitions of learn- 
ing, types of learning, transfer, and the development of learning 
theory. Special attention will be given to recent studies of concept 
formation, problem-solving, the impact of the emotions upon 
learning, and the neurological aspects of learning. 

The Department 

Ed 041 Educational Psychology and the Adolescent (F, S; 3) 

An introduction to the psychology and problems of the adolescent 
years. Biological changes, cultural influences, the identity crisis, 
educational needs, and adult and peer relationships will be dis- 
cussed. Consideration will be given to the impact that rapid cul- 
tural change has on youth. Adolescence in other cultures will be 
discussed in order to provide a better perspective on American 
youth. William K. Kilpatrick 

Ed 050 Field Practicum, Sophomore (F, S; 1) 

A one day per week field experience each semester of the soph- 
omore year. In school and non-school sites for elementary, alter- 
native education, severe special needs and early childhood 
programs. This is the field lab for Ed 104, Ed 147 and Ed 200. 
Application must be made prior to the pre-registration period. 
Pass/Fail Joan C. Jones 

Ed 051 Field Practicum, Junior (F, S; 1) 

A one day per week field lab in school or non-school sites for 
elementary, alternative education, severe special needs and early 
childhood programs. This lab relates to Ed 101, Ed 102, Ed 104, 
Ed 105, Ed 108, Ed 109, Ed 114, Ed 144, Ed 308, Ed 204, and Ed 
383. Application for this experience must be made during the 
semester preceding the practicum. 
Pass/Fail Joan C. Jones 

Ed 052 Field Practicum, Human Development (F, S; 1) 

Students perform a field experience for eight to ten hours per 
week at a site selected with approval of the instructor. Students 
keep a journal of their field experience and attend a weekly sem- 
inar on campus. 
Pass/Fail Mary Brabeck 

Ed 060 Educational Measurement (F, S; 3) 

This course stresses evaluative concerns in the classroom. Topics 
covered include informal evaluation, objective writing, item and 
test construction, test scoring, validity and reliability. 

Peter W. Airasian 

John A. Jensen 

John /. Walsh 

Ed 061 Psycho-Educational Measurement (F; 3) 

This course is limited to students majoring in Human Develop- 
ment. Principles of standardized test selection and utilization; 
validity; reliability; standard scores; norms; interpretation of test 
data; survey of measures of achievement, adjustment, aptitude, 
intelligence, interests and personality; current controversies and 
ethical considerations. The Department 

Ed 101 Teaching Language Arts (F, S; 3) 

The course provides tbe student with the content and competen- 
cies necessary for teaching the communication areas of listening, 



120 / School of Education 

COURSE OFFERINGS 



speaking and writing to elementary age children. Theoretical con- 
tent is integrated with practical application both in the university 
setting and the elementary classroom. Lillian Buckley 

Charles Smith 

Ed 102 Teaching Music, Art, and Movement (F, S; 3) 

The course treats those areas of music, art, and physical education 
that the elementary school teacher needs in the classroom. 

The Department 

Ed 104 Teaching Elementary Reading Methods (F, S; 3) 

This course examines major approaches to teaching reading, di- 
agnostic-prescriptive techniques, and materials appropriate for 
the development of basic reading skills. John Savage 

Bonnie Lass 

Ed 105 Teaching Social Studies (F, S; 3) 

Theory and practice in modern social studies education, involv- 
ing public school experience centers and college personnel in a 
carefully orchestrated program focusing on student instruction 
and guidance in the development of requisite professional 
competencies. Katharine C. Cotter 

Charles Smith 

Ed 108 Mathematics for Teachers (F, S; 3) 

Curriculum materials and instructional techniques useful in 
teaching mathematics to elementary school children will be ex- 
amined. This course covers instruction in Early Childhood and 
grades one to six. Lecture and laboratory. Michael Schiro 

Ed 109 Elementary Science for Teachers (F, S; 3) 

The exploration of science materials, instructional methodologies 
and issues on an individual/group basis. Grades one to six. Lec- 
ture and laboratory. George T. Ladd 

Ed 110 History of Western Education (F, S; 3) 

Beginning with classical Greek education, this course surveys the 
principal cultural and educational movements of Western 
education. Edward /. Power 

Pierre D. Lambert 

Ed 113 Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages 
(TESOL) (F; 3) 

The course is designed to introduce bilingual and other teachers 
to the theory and practice of TESOL, emphasizing the special 
linguistic and cultural problems facing learners of English as a 
second language. Various approaches and methods of second lan- 
guage teaching will be examined through readings, lectures, films 
and school visits. Practice in TESOL will be gained through lesson 
planning, in class demonstrations, microteaching and evaluation 
of materials. 

Students will develop ability to respond to the needs of adult 
illiterates and individual ESL students in regular classes. 

The Department 

Ed 114 Methods and Materials in Early Childhood Education 
(F;3) 

This course explores the methods and materials appropriate to 
teaching young children. Both the class discussions and the prac- 
ticum involve the development and evaluation of materials and 
methodologies applicable to the learning environments of young 
children including such areas as the arts, communication skills, 
and physical education. Beth Casey 

Ed 115 Curriculum and Models in Early Childhood Education 
(S;3) 

This course is designed to explore different views of early child- 
hood education including such models as Piagetian, Montessori, 
and Open Education. Compensatory education as well as cross- 
cultural early childhood models (e.g. the Chinese conception) 
will be discussed. Within this context, an overview of the cur- 
riculum, preschool through grade three, will be explored. Also 
included will be discussion of the organization of the classroom, 
classroom management, health issues, planning a lesson, and set- 
ting the goals of instruction. By the end of the course students 
will be expected to formulate their own early childhood educa- 
tion model. Beth Casey 



Ed 116 Exploring Science and Social Studies through the 
Environment: Early Childhood Education Methods (S; 3) 

This course explores science and social studies materials and 
methodologies for teaching preschoolers through third grade. A 
special emphasis is given to the development of problem-solving 
abilities in young children as they explore their environment. 

The Department 

Ed 126 Secondary Speech Communication (F; 3) 

This course will focus on communication theory and practice. It 
is designed especially for students who intend to pursue a career 
in teaching. Special emphasis will be placed on the lecture and 
discussion methods of teaching. Both verbal and nonverbal com- 
munication techniques will be stressed in the speaking exercises 
that form the nucleus of the course. 

For those students who are majors in communication and the- 
atre, this course will contain a unit devoted to such essential 
items as organizing the performance course, planning relevant 
communication and theatre exercises, and evaluating students' 
performance. Non-majors will participate in an alternative learn- 
ing experience while this special unit is being taught. 

Students are reminded that this is a field based course. 

Dorman Picklesimer 

Ed 130 Introduction to Teaching in the Middle School (S; 3) 

Middle schools today are organized quite differently from that of 
the self-contained classroom and the typical junior high school. 
The middle school teacher (5-9) needs to possess a carefully 
planned specialization of subject matter, and understanding of 
the special needs of the pre- and early adolescent, and the ca- 
pability to create varied learning environments made possible by 
the more adaptive middle school organization. 

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts on 
which middle schools are organized with special emphasis on 
what all of this means for the middle school teacher. Visitation 
to selected middle schools is also part of the course. This course 
is part of the prepracticum and will service a useful purpose in 
planning a student's program. William A. Griffin 

Ed 131 Middle-School Field Practicum, Sophomore (F, S; 1) 

A one-half day per week field experience. This is the field com- 
ponent for the course entitled "Introduction to Teaching in the 
Middle-School". 

Ed 132 Middle-School Field Practicum, Junior (F, S; 1) 

A one-half day per week field experience. This is the field com- 
ponent for the student's special methods course. 

Ed 133 Middle-School Curriculum (F, S; 3) 

This course takes place during the first four weeks of the fall or 
spring semester of the senior year. Students study the curriculum 
guides and other materials related to the subject-matter fields 
which they will be teaching. During this time they will become 
familiar with the school's philosophy, policies, and practices, 
and the vertical articulation of instruction over a three or four- 
year span. Planning for student teaching is a vital part of this 
four-week period inasmuch as there may be two subject-matter 
teaching fields involved. A major part of this course is field- 
based. William M. Griffin 

Ed 134 Middle-School Senior Practicum (F, S; 12) 

A twelve-week practicum for seniors majoring in Middle-School 
Education. Placements are made in selected middle schools. This 
practicum follows the course in Middle-School Curriculum. Stu- 
dents are assigned to a full-day experience and follow the school's 
calendar. Prerequisites are a 2.5 grade point average and suc- 
cessful completion of all pre-practicum requirements. Applica- 
tion procedures are to be completed during the semester preceding 
the practicum. William M. Griffin 

Ed 144 Reading and Language Arts Preschool through Third 
Grade (F; 3) 

This course examines approaches, planning and evaluating of 
reading and language arts for Early Childhood Education. 

Bonnie Lass 

Ed 145 Children's Literature (F, S; 3) 

Course content exposes students to the major genres in children's 
literature: picture books, folklore, fantasy, science fiction, biog- 



School of Education / 121 

COURSE OFFERINGS 



raphies, historical fiction and contemporary realistic fiction. It 
is expected that students will engage in wide reading of the lit- 
erature available for children at the elementary level. 

Lillian Buckley 

Ed 146 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading (F, S; 3) 

Causes of reading disability, the means of diagnosing and cor- 
recting disabilities and varieties of remedial materials will be the 
topics of study for this course. Bonnie Lass 

Ed 147 Early Childhood Development and Learning (F; 3) 

This course focuses on development of the child from birth to 
seven years of age. The emphasis is on an in depth understanding 
of the young child and on the ability to apply this knowledge to 
a learning environment. To facilitate this integration of theory 
and practice, students and faculty hold classes together at a co- 
operating nursery school near the college. Beth Casey 

Ed 148 Media and Curriculum (F, S; 3) 

This course is designed to demonstrate ways in which media do 
affect the teaching/learning process in the classroom. Students 
are able to develop a proficiency in the operation of basic audi- 
ovisual equipment: projectors, audio tape recorders, video tape 
recorders, and display boards. The course demonstrates the cri- 
teria used in the selection and utilization of instructional mate- 
rials for specific learning situations. It enables students to design 
and produce instructional materials using the facilities of Uni- 
versity Audiovisual Services. The Department 

Ed 151 Problems in Urban Education (F, S; 3) 

The course aims to acquaint the student with the urban com- 
munity, its people, and their problems. It includes at least four 
field trips to inner-city agencies, centers, organizations, and 
events, as well as attendance of on-campus classes. 

Charles Smith 

Ed 160 Introduction to Computers in Education (F, S; 3) 

An introduction to computers and their applications in educa- 
tion. The origins, development and workings of computers will 
be reviewed. Current hardware and software systems will be de- 
scribed and demonstrated. Students will develop algorithms for 
the solution of elementary problems and will program their so- 
lutions using the BASIC language. The course will emphasize 
practical experiences with present systems, but will also explore 
new developments in hardware and software and their implica- 
tions for education. John A. Jensen 

Ed 161 Computer Programming (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ed 160 or equivalent 

A course in planning, writing, debugging and executing computer 
programs of intermediate difficulty using the PL1 language. Other 
topics include: IBM Job control Language and operating systems; 
data acquisition, file construction and maintenance using punched 
cards, teleprocessing and optical scanning equipment; sequential 
and direct access storage media and methods; and experience in 
the use of existing program systems for statistical analysis. 

John A. Jensen 

Ed 162 Educational Measurement Using Computers (F; 3) 

This course provides an introduction to the principles of mea- 
surement and evaluation as they apply to classroom settings, and 
deals with the capabilities of computer hardware and software 
in the measurement and evaluation of student progress. Emphasis 
will be placed on designing measurement sequences and pro- 
gramming them for presentation and anlysis using the DECAL 
language. Each student will develop and pilot test a measurement 
sequence as a term project. The Department 

Ed 199 Independent Study in Education (F, S; 3) 

This course provides independent research opportunities to the 
student under the guidance of an instructor. The research project 
must be approved one month before the beginning of the course 
by the instructor and the Associate Dean. The Department 

Ed 200 Introduction to Children with Special Needs (F, S; 3) 

This course will provide an introduction to various disabilities 
and resulting special needs. Among topics considered are defi- 
nitions, characteristics, approaches to education, and current 



trends in service delivery. One day per week practicum in the 
Boston College Campus School is required. The Department 

Ed 201 Classroom Management: Children With Special Needs 
(F;3) 

This course focuses on observation and precise description of 
learning behaviors, followed by a presentation of motivational 
and management approaches to children in the classroom. Stu- 
dents write anecdotal records and employ informal behavioral 
checklists. In addition, students will identify general character- 
istics of special needs children and prepare appropriate accom- 
modation strategies with which a classroom teacher might 
support and foster successful learning experiences in children 
with special needs. Students will also propose and present a 
rationale for selected management techniques for specified 
children. James Cremins 

Alec Peck 

Ed 203 Philosophy of Education (F, S; 3) 

A study of educational theory and its influence on educational 
practice, and an application of philosophical principle to basic 
educational policy. Pierre D. Lambert 

Edward J. Power 

Ed 204 Independent Living Skills (S; 3) 

This course will focus on the development of skills to enable 
people with special needs to live as independently as possible. 
Extensive consideration will also be given to various types of 
residential placements for people with special needs and issues 
involved in establishing these settings and developing programs 
in them. A six hour per week field placement is a part of this 
course. The Department 

Ed 205 Occupational Preparatory Skills (S; 3) 

The world of work for the handicapped individual is approached 
from the viewpoint of societal attitudes and basic skill prepara- 
tion with an emphasis upon current legislation, service delivery 
systems, task analysis and other training procedures leading to 
job placement and follow-up. Content areas will focus on the 
moderately and severely disabled adolescent and adult within 
non public school settings. A six-hour field placement is a co- 
ordinated part of this course. The Department 

Ed 206 Habilitation of Individuals with Special Needs (S, 3) 

This course deals with theoretical, philosophical, and practical 
daily needs aspects of developing vocational and social programs 
for persons with special needs. The Department 

Ed 208 Educational Strategies for Children with Special Needs 
(S;3) 

This course focuses on the individualization of instruction for 
children with special needs. The role of the teacher, rather than 
that of materials, is stressed as the dominant factor. Students will 
develop a rationale and demonstrate skills in individualizing in- 
struction for a variety of children with special needs. 

James Cremins 
John B. Junkala 

Ed 209 Educational Assessment of Children with Special 
Needs (F, S; 3) 

This course deals with formal and informal assessment tech- 
niques to be used in the development of individualized educa- 
tional programs (IEPs). The development of observation skills is 
stressed, with a heavy emphasis on task analysis. 

James Cremins 
John B. Junkala 

Ed 210 Introduction to Speech and Language Disorders (F; S; 3) 

This course presents an overview of speech and language dis- 
orders in children. Includes introduction to assessment tech- 
niques, remedial strategies and curriculum modifications for 
children with problems in receptive and expressive 
language. Jean Mooney 

Ed 211 Learning Problems of Special Needs Adolescents (S; 3) 

This course will focus on the secondary special needs student. 
Topics discussed will include: behavior management, laws, in- 
dividualizing instruction, curriculum modification, and other 
topics. Students who enroll in this course will be required to 



122 / School of Education 

COURSE OFFERINGS 



participate one-half day per week in a secondary school setting, 

grades nine to twelve. James Cremins 

Ed 212 Secondary School Lab (S; 1) 

This course is the lab and field work for Ed 211. One-half day 
per week is required. Joan C. Jones 

Ed 213 Research Seminar in Special Residential/Vocational 
Learning Environments (S; 3) 

Students will be made aware of current trends, issues, and leg- 
islation in the field, developing an in depth project, either re- 
search or field based, which will be planned, implemented, and 
completed during the course. Emphasis will be placed upon de- 
veloping an area of interest of the student and contributing some- 
thing original and useful to the field. Marcia Brom/ield 

Ed 220 Cultural Studies in Language and Linguistics (F; 3) 

The course focuses on the nature and structure of American Eng- 
lish with direct application to English instruction in the second- 
ary school. Course topics include the study of phonology, 
morphology, syntax, the history of language, semantics, and di- 
alect, specifically as these topics relate to vocabulary develop- 
ment, composition, grammar and reading instruction in the 
secondary school classroom. This course is required for all stu- 
dents in Secondary Education and English. John Savage 

Ed 225 Comparative Education (S; 3) 

This course examines the various educational systems of other 
countries. Particular emphasis is given to European countries. 

Pierre Lambert 

Ed 230 Abnormal Psychology (S; 3) 

Type of functional personality disorders with emphasis on di- 
agnostic and dynamic aspects. Designed to give counselors and 
other school personnel basic information for recognition and un- 
derstanding of mental disturbance. Prequisite: Ed 242 

Hayden Duggin 

Ed 241 Interpersonal Relations (F; S; 3) 

Focuses on the person and his or her ability to live and work 
with other people. This course will help the student to look at 
herself or himself and choose those social techniques which will 
increase effectiveness as a person who can manage successfully, 
participate in and organize programs which involve living and 
working with other people. Open to majors in Human Develop- 
ment only. Prerequisites: Ed 030, Ed 032, Ed 041. Francis Kelly 

VonciJe White 

Ed 242 Personality Theories (F, S; 3) 

This course gives an introduction to the various theories of per- 
sonality. It shows the relationship between personality and coun- 
seling theory. Open to majors in Human Development only. 
Prerequisites: Ed 030, Ed 032, Ed 041. Mary Brabeck 

Ed 243 Counseling Theories (S; 3) 

This course gives an introduction to the various theories of coun- 
seling. Prerequisites for this course are Ed 241 and Ed 242. Open 
to majors in Human Development only. Mary Brabeck 

Ed 244 Adult Psychology (S; 3) 

This course is designed to investigate the psychological, socio- 
logical, anthropological and historical aspects of adult develop- 
ment. Stages of life and crises which must be met and mastered 
in those stages will be given special attention. John Dacey 

Ed 245 Human Development Senior Field Experience (S; 3) 

This course is designed as a senior seminar. Students will meet 
once a week to discuss their required field work (eight to ten 
hours per week) and to relate their field work to the theories and 
skills studied throughout their Human Development programs. 
In addition students will be required to research the literature on 
an aspect of their field work. This course is open only to seniors 
in the Human Development major, with consent of 
instructor. Mary Brabeck 

Ed 250 Elementary Student Teaching (F, S; 12) 

A semester Field Experience (300+ clock hours) for seniors ma- 
joring in elementary education. Placements are made in area 
schools or selected sites overseas and out-of-state. Students are 
assigned to a full day experience in an elementary classroom 



setting. Prerequisites are a 2.5 grade point average and successful 
completion of all required courses. Applications must be com- 
pleted during the semester preceding the student teaching 
assignment. The Department 

Ed 251 Secondary Student Teaching (F, S; 12) 

A semester Field Experience (300+ clock hours) for seniors ma- 
joring in secondary education. Placements are in area schools or 
selected sites overseas or out-of-state. Students are assigned a full 
day experience in middle or senior high schools. Prerequisites 
are a 2.5 grade point average and completion of all required prac- 
ticums and courses. Application procedures are to be completed 
during the semester preceding the student teaching 
assignment. The Department 

Ed 252 Elementary Student Teaching (F, S; 9) 

A semester Field Experience (300+ clock hours) for seniors ma- 
joring in elementary education. Placements are made in area 
schools or selected sites overseas and out-of-state. Students are 
assigned to a full day experience in an elementary classroom 
setting. Prerequisites are a 2.5 grade point average and successful 
completion of all required courses. Applications must be com- 
pleted during the semester preceding the student teaching as- 
signment and have permission of the program director and 
Associate Dean. The Department 

Ed 253 Special Education Student Teaching (S; 6) 

A six-week full day practicum for seniors in special education 
programs. Placements are in area schools and non-school sites. 
Prerequisites are a 2.5 grade point average and successful com- 
pletion of required course and field work. Applications are to be 
submitted the semester preceding the practicums. 

The Department 

Ed 254 Bilingual Student Teaching (S; 3) 

A six-week practicum for seniors in bilingual programs. Place- 
ments are in area schools and non-school sites. Prerequisites are 
a 2.5 grade point average and successful completion of all re- 
quired course and field work. Applications are to be submitted 
the semester preceding the practicum. The Department 

Ed 256 Secondary Student Teaching (S; 9) 

A semester full-day experience for Arts and Sciences seniors 
minoring in Secondary Education. Placements are made in area 
junior and senior high schools. Prerequisites are a 2.5 grade point 
average and successful completion of required course and field 
work. Applications are to be submitted the semester preceding 
this practicum. The Department 

Ed 258 Secondary Schools Observation (F, S; 1) 

This course is the required one-half day per week lab for the 
Secondary Teaching Method Courses, Ed 300, 301, 302, 303 and 
304. Applications are to be submitted the semester preceding this 
practicum. The Department 

Ed 259 Internship in Special Residential/Vocational Learning 
Environments (S; 12) 

A fifteen-week full-time field experience in a residential/voca- 
tional setting. Students will work with programs, methods, and 
materials to meet the life and occupational needs of moderately 
to severely handicapped individuals. Prerequisites are comple- 
tion of all pre-practicum and required course work. 

The Department 

Ed 260 Elementary Student Teaching, Gifted (F, S; 3) 

A six-week full-time (150+ clock hours) practicum for under- 
graduate seniors in elementary education whose specialization 
is Gifted Education to be taken after Ed 250. Students are assigned 
to gifted classrooms at the elementary (1-6) level. Prerequisites 
are a 2.5 grade point average and successful completion of all 
required courses. Application for this experience must be made 
during the semester preceding the practicum. The Department 

Ed 261 Secondary Student Teaching, Gifted (F, S; 3) 

A six-week practicum for seniors majoring in Secondary Edu- 
cation with special interest in working with gifted youth. Stu- 
dents are assigned to a full day experience in middle or senior 



School of Education / 123 

COURSE OFFERINGS 



high schools' gifted settings. Prerequisites are a 2.5 grade point 
average and approval of the Program Coordinator. 

The Department 

Ed 262 Internship, Elementary (F, S; 3) 

Participation/observation experiences working in education re- 
lated activities at schools or non school sites, including museums, 
business, and government or social agencies. Requirements and 
time periods arranged by advisors. By permission only. 

The Department 

Ed 263 Internship, Secondary (F, S; 3) 

Participation/observation experiences working in education re- 
lated activities at schools or non school sites, including museums, 
business, and government or social agencies. Requirements and 
time periods arranged by advisors. By permission only. 

The Department 

Ed 264 Early Childhood Student Teaching (F, S; 12) 

A semester (300+ clock hours) practicum for seniors majoring 
in Early Childhood Education (N-3). Placements are made in nurs- 
ery and primary schools or selected out-of-state/overseas sites. 
Prerequisites for this experience are a 2.5 grade point average and 
successful completion of all required course and field work. Ap- 
plications are to be submitted the semester preceding this 
practicum. The Department 

Ed 265 Early Childhood Student Teaching (F, S; 6) 

A six-week (150+ clock hours) practicum for seniors majoring 
in Elementary Education who wish additional same as for other 
courses in student teaching. Applications are to be submitted the 
semester preceding this practicum. The Department 

Ed 266 Student Teaching, Severe Special Needs (F, S; experience 
in kindergarten through grade three. Prerequisites are the 12) 

A full semester practicum of five days per week for seniors en- 
rolled in the Severe Special Needs Program. Students work in 
school and nonschool sites with severely handicapped children 
and youth. Applicants must have completed all course and field 
requirements and have the approval of their program director. 
Application procedures are to be completed the semester pre- 
ceding this practicum. The Department 

Ed 274 Alcohol and Drug Abuse in Education (S; 3) 

Exploration of the many facets of alcohol and drug abuse prob- 
lems. Investigation of alcohol, drugs, and their effects, users, non- 
users, education programs, rehabilitation programs and community 
actions. The Department 

Ed 275 Sex Education (F; 3) 

This course is designed to cover the physiology of human repro- 
duction with emphasis on the development of sexuality leading 
to marriage and influences of the family; special topics of re- 
sponsibilities, venereal disease, sex hygiene, and birth control. 

The Department 

Ed 276 Adapted Physical Education for the Child with 
Special Needs (F, S; 3) 

Acquaints the student with the mental and physical aspects of 
children with special needs. Emphasis is placed on recognition 
and remediation of a child's handicap and assisting in developing 
abilities to fullest potential. Practicum in elementary schools and 
hospital settings provide for enrichment and utilization of 
theories. Theresa A. Powell 

Ed 277 Elementary Methods of Physical Education (F, S; 3) 

An integrated course designed to give students a working knowl- 
edge of purposes of physical education and its activities in the 
elementary school child. Practicum in elementary school setting 



provides for enrichment and utilization of theoretical ideas and 

concepts. 

Not offered 1982-1983 Theresa A. Powell 

Ed 278 Personal Skills in Individual and Team Sports (F, S; 3) 

Emphasis is placed on the development of personal skills in se- 
lected activities, along with methods and materials used for ef- 
fective teaching in Physical Education. Theresa A. Powell 

Ed 279 Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology (S; 3) 

The course includes the theoretical and practical knowledge nec- 
essary for the understanding of human movement and the tech- 
niques of analyzing motor skills. The Department 

Ed 290 Number Theory for Teachers (F; 3) 

This course is intended to focus on a wealth of topics that relate 
specifically to the natural numbers. These will be treated as mo- 
tivational problems to be used in an activity-oriented approach 
to mathematics in the elementary school. The course will also 
provide a foundation for the prospective teacher in working with 
induction, the division and Euclidean algorithms, prime facto- 
rization, prime number facts and conjectures, modular arithmetic 
and mathematical art. Margaret /. Kenney 

Ed 291 Geometry for Teachers (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ed 290 

This course is intended to fill a basic need of all elementary 
teachers. Geometry now occupies a significant role in the ele- 
mentary mathematics curriculum. The course will treat content 
but ideas for presenting geometry as an activity-based program 
will be stressed. Topics to be covered in depth include the square 
and triangular geoboards, motion geometry, and their relation to 
the standard Euclidean geometry. Margaret /. Kenney 

Ed 300 Secondary Science Methods (F; 3) 

A survey of the available secondary science curricula will be 
combined with an individually chosen in-depth study of one 
curriculum project. Students will present demonstration lessons 
to the class and examine ways to facilitate the inquiry approach 
in science teaching. Substantial field work required. 
W., 4:30 The Department 

Ed 301 Secondary History Methods (F; 3) 

This course will demonstrate methods for organizing a unit, uti- 
lizing original sources, employing drama and sociodrama, de- 
veloping critical thinking, facilitating inquiry learning, integrating 
the social studies, and evaluation. Students will be required to 
develop and present sample lessons and units. Substantial field 
work required. 
W., 4:30 The Department 

Ed 302 Secondary English Methods (F; 3) 

This course carries the Secondary School English Major from an 
introductory phase that shows the place of the English Depart- 
ment in the Secondary School Plan to a closing phase in which 
he or she has a comprehensive look at research in progress in the 
teaching of English. In between these two phases, he or she dis- 
covers what will make an effective, successful teacher of English. 
The student receives much practice in Semester, Unit and Daily 
planning for the teaching of lessons in Listening/Speaking, Writ- 
ing, Literature, Language Study (Traditional and Modern) and 
Mass Media Study. Substantial field work required. 
W., 4:30 The Department 

Ed 303 Secondary Language Methods (F; 3) 

Analysis in approaches and methods in modern language teach- 
ing. Presentation of specific techniques, including the use of the 
language laboratory. Emphasis is placed on specifying behavioral 
objectives and evaluation procedures. Substantial field work re- 
quired. 
W., 4:30 The Department 

Ed 304 Secondary Math Methods (F; 3) 

This course is designed to prepare the student for teaching ex- 
perience in the secondary school. It includes topics such as class- 
room procedure, preparing lesson plans, structuring tests, grading 
tests, and evaluation of student performance. The responsibility 
of the student teacher to the cooperating teacher is covered in 
detail as time permits, mathematical topics are developed which 



124 / School of Education 

COURSE OFFERINGS 



will provide background information. This will allow a more 
meaningful presentation of various units in mathematics. Sub- 
stantial field work required. 
W., 4:30 The Department 

Ed 306 Secondary Methods (S; 3) 

A course designed to prepare teachers for grades nine to twelve 
in methodology and curriculum. The Department 

Ed 307 Quantitative Skill Development — 
Preschool Through Grade 3 (S; 3) 

Activities that help preschool and kindergarten children develop 
quantitative skills in the area of mathematics and science are 
explored. Activities are drawn from such areas as art, movement, 
music, block building, and nature study. 
M., 4:30-6:15 Michael Schiro 

Ed 308 Health Education: Planning and Diagnosis (S; 3) 

This course offers an educational diagnostic approach to planning 
for health promotion and illness prevention. Social, cultural, and 
psychological determinants of health and illness behavior will 
be explored. Clinical, community agency and school health ed- 
ucation models will be reviewed. 
Th., 4:30-6:15 Daniel Merrigan, S.J. 

Ed 309 Critical Issues: Wellness and Health Education (F; 3) 

This course is an introduction to the major components of human 
health and well being. Students will examine the personal, social, 
environmental and cultural determinants of health in order to 
assess their potential for optimal well-being. The concept of well- 
ness education and its relationship to personal health status and 
professional development will be emphasized. 
Th., 4:30-6:15 Daniel Merrigan, S.J. 

Ed 310 Family, School, and Community Relations (S, 3) 

This course focuses on family interactions and community re- 
lations both in terms of how they influence the child and how 
the teacher can effectively respond to these factors. Included are 
discussions of the short and longterm effects of divorce, single 
parent families, step-families, poverty and cultural differences. 
There will be a focus on the teacher working with parents in 
terms of parent education and parent involvement in school. In 
addition, emphasis will be placed on helping children develop 
a greater sensitivity to their own and other cultures through mul- 
ticultural education. The Department 

Ed 315 The Psychology of Adolescence (S; 3) 

An analysis of the psychology and problems of the adolescent 
years. Biological changes, value development, the influence of 
media, sexual identity, cultural influences, and relationships 
with adults will be discussed. Current philosophical and cultural 
trends will be examined in regard to their impact on youth. Ad- 
olescence in other cultures will be discussed in order to provide 
a better perspective on American youth. Accounts of adolescence 
from literature will be used to supplement theory. 
M., 4:30-6:15 William K. Kilpatrick 

Ed 316 Seminar and Practicum: An Early Childhood Model 
(F, S; 3) 

This course will involve a joint project by a group of educators 
in a cooperative effort to construct and implement a model of 
early childhood education. Students will participate in a seminar 
at Boston College plus a one-day-per-week field practicum at one 
of the two model early childhood sites. The cooperating teachers 
at the model sites and the Boston College consultants in the proj- 
ects will participate in the seminar with the students. The sites 
consist of a preschool program for four-year-olds and a pre-kin- 
dergarten program for younger kindergarten-age children. These 
programs are designed and implemented by Boston College in 
collaboration with two schools in Brookline, a private pre-school 
and an elementary school. Students will have concrete experience 
in developing a variety of teaching strategies and will be video- 
taped using these strategies. At each site there will be close su- 
pervision by a consultant from Boston College as well as by the 
cooperating teacher. Undergraduate students should take this 
course in conjunction with the field practicum, Ed 050 and grad- 
uate students should take it in conjunction with Ed 429. Seniors 
doing student teaching will spend five-days-per-week at the site 
and will take the course along with Ed 250. Placement at the 



model sites will satisfy the practicum requirements for the above 
field practicum courses. 

Fall, M 4:30-6:15 Beth Casey 

Spring, T 4:30-6:15 

Ed 318 Reading-Language Arts Preschool through 
Grade Two (S; 3) 

Approaches, planning and evaluating reading/language arts in- 
struction and materials for early childhood education. 
T., 4:30-6:15 Bonnie Lass 

Ed 319 Psychology and Education of Creative People (S; 3) 

This course will consider psychological aspects of four areas of 
creative activity; personality, productivity, mental processes, and 
physiological processes. It will combine consideration of current 
research and measurement studies with the research and expe- 
riences of the students themselves. All age levels of creative de- 
velopment are included. 
Th., 4:30-6:15 John S. Dacey 

Ed 321 Language and the Language Arts (S; 3) 

A course that examines the nature and structure of language and 
how it applies to the teaching of language arts with an emphasis 
on written language, in the elementary and middle schools. 
M., 4:30-6:15 John Savage 

Ed 323 Reading Instruction in the Secondary School (S; 3) 

A course that includes principles and practices of developmental 
and remedial reading instruction at the junior and senior high 
school levels. There will be particular emphasis on teaching read- 
ing in content areas. 
Th., 4:30-6:15 . John Savage 

Ed 326 Science in the Secondary School (F; 3) 

Current issues, trends and innovations in science education at 
the secondary (7-12) level will be investigated and discussed. 
This course is required of all M.S.T., C.A.E.S., and Doctoral stu- 
dents with a science education emphasis in their programs. 

George T. Ladd 

Ed 327 Teaching the Gifted (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ed 327 and consent of the instructor. 
Experientially conducted, the course is open primarily to Grad- 
uate students. A three-level teacher-training model is the basis 
for participating in the design of learning sequences for the gifted. 
Gifted youngers are brought into class for instruction by small 
groups of class members. 
Th., 4:30-6:15 Nina GreenwaJd 

Ed 328 Psychology of the Gifted (F; 3) 

Psycho-social characteristics of the gifted, including undera- 
chiever, culturally different, disadvantaged; related to education 
and guidance. 
Th., 4:30-6:15 Katharine C. Cotter 

Ed 330 Field Education and Supervised Practicum in Religious 
Education (F, S; 3) 

This program provides the student with supervised experience 
in Religious Education. The practicum provides an opportunity 
to integrate theory and practices as related to individual field 
experiences. Consultation and process analysis will be used to 
critique performance and develop personal skills and individual 
styles of ministry. 
By arrangement Religious Education Faculty 

Ed 334 Special Projects in Religious Education (F, S; 3) 

Independent study in religious education contexts, involving im- 
plementation of academic content in the field, under the direction 
of a faculty advisor. 
By arrangement 

334.01 Mary C. Boys, S.N./.M 

334.02 Rev. Thomas Groome 

334.03 Padraic O'Hare 

Ed 350 Legal Rights of Teachers and Students (S; 3) 

A course designed to acquaint teachers with their legal rights and 

the rights of students.T., Th., 9:00-11:00 

Beginning March 1 Lester E. Przewlocki 

Ed 373 Explorations in Humanistic Education (S; 3) 

A comprehensive practical analysis of humanistic education in 
terms of its goals, conditions, implementation and defense in a 



School of Education / 125 

COURSE OFFERINGS 



new era of accountability. Special attention will be given to cur- 
rent concerns affecting humanistic education. 
T., 4:30-6:15 Katharine C. Cotter 

Ed 374 Management of the Behavior of Severe Special 
Needs Students (F; 3) 

The focus is primarily on behavior modification principles and 
practices for severe special needs students. Students will be ex- 
posed to theoretical constructs underlying classical and operant 
conditioning, management programs for increasing and decreas- 
ing the frequency of behaviors, schedules of reinforcement, and 
related topics. 
M., 4:30—6:15 James Cremins 

Ed 380 Visual Handicaps and Education (F; 2) 

A study of the anatomy and function of the eye with emphasis 
on common life diseases and their effect on vision. Included is 
the use of residual vision, optical aids and educational-rehabil- 
itative implications of various types of eye conditions. 
W., 4:30-6:15 Richard Jackson 

Ed 382 Communications (Manual) (Intercession; 1) (S; 1) 

A course designed to introduce students to various modes of 

communication utilized by the handicapped, i.e., Braille, manual 

alphabet, natural gestures, signing. The course is designed for 

students who want an exposure to alternative communication 

systems. 

By arrangement George Zimmerman 

Ed 384 Multihandicapped Education Seminar (F; 3) 

The focus of this seminar is curriculum planning for the Multi- 
handicapped child. A developmental approach is taken with the 
greatest emphasis being placed on the domains of cognitive, lan- 
guage, self-help, motor, and social development. Practical expe- 
riences are incorporated into this course. 
F., 4:30 Richard Weisenfeld 

Ed 386 Communication (Manual) II (S; 2) 

A course in the techniques of manual communication with an 
exploration of the use of body language and natural postures, 
fingerspelling and American sign language. Theoretical founda- 
tions of total communication will be investigated (includes 
Braille for students in the Peripatology Program). 

Limited to students in the Deaf/Blind, Multihandicapped Pro- 
gram and the Peripatology Program. Meets twice a week. 
W., 6:00-8:00 Terrell Clark 

Ed 387 Assessment of Young Children with Special Needs (F; 3) 

The assessment process, including norm-referenced and criterion 
referenced devices for children birth to six, is the primary focus 
of this course. Observational schedules and functional vision and 
hearing assessments are addressed. Children with special needs 
at different developmental ages are assessed both in class and as 
outside requirements. 
F., 4:30-6:15 Sherrill Butterfield 

Ed 392 Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children (S; 3) 

Characteristics and special education needs of handicapped and 
gifted children will be considered. Recent trends relative to as- 
sessment of administrative arrangements for and teaching strat- 
egies appropriate to exceptional children will be discussed. 
Consideration will also be given to legislation and regulations 
pertaining to the education of exceptional children. 
T., 4:30-6:15 John Eichorn 

Ed 393 Student Teaching: Visually Handicapped 
(F, S, Summer; 2) 

Students in the program for Educator of the Visually Handicapped 
will have eight weeks student teaching (10-12 hours per week) 
in a school or program for the visually handicapped. Last eight 
weeks of semester. With consent of instructor. 
By arrangement To be announced 

Ed 398 Working with Parents of Severe Special 
Needs Students (F; 3) 

Topics include stages of parental acceptance of handicapping 
conditions, transfer out of the natural home, chronic sorrow, de- 
velopment of home-based behavior modification programs, and 



preparation of parents as teachers. A respite care field experience 
is required of students in the Severe Special Needs program. 
Th., 4:30 Alec Peck 

Ed 399 Career/Vocational Placement and Follow-up 
Procedures (S; 3) 

Procedures for working with employers, securing job placement 
sites in the community for the handicapped adolescent, and main- 
tenance of those placements through structured follow-up will 
be implemented through several current procedures appropriate 
in rural and urban settings. Skills necessary to adapt work stations 
for the handicapped, evaluate entry level skills for job placement, 
and conduct follow-up counseling are stressed within the course. 
T., 4:30-6:15 The Department 



School of 
Management 




School of Management 

In order to meet an ever increasing demand for undergraduate 
liberal and professional education for the modern world of busi- 
ness, the College of Business Administration was inaugurated as 
an integral part of Boston College in 1938. The first freshman 
class of the College met in downtown Boston, but a rapid expan- 
sion of the program caused the College to be moved out to the 
Chestnut Hill campus in 1940. Following World War II, the Col- 
lege of Business Administration moved to its own new permanent 
building — Fulton Hall — which had been especially constructed 
for it on the main campus with well-equipped lecture halls, con- 
ference rooms, and its own large library. In the Fall of 1957 the 
Graduate School of Business Administration was founded. In 
October, 1969, the Directors of the University voted to incorporate 
both schools into a School of Management with an Undergraduate 
and a Graduate Division. The name School of Management is in 
itself a reflection of our goals and objectives — to educate the man- 
agers and leaders of organizations, whether they be business, 
government, hospital or education oriented. 

Objectives of the 
School of Management 

In recent years, a great deal of attention has been directed toward 
determining the most effective approach for the education of 
managers. Perhaps no other segment of the academic community 
has subjected itself to such penetrating self-analysis. The con- 
sequence of this effort is the recognition of the need for profes- 
sional education based on broad knowledge rather than specialized 
training. There is a great need for managers who have the nec- 
essary psychological attitudes and professional skills to enable 
them to be effective in a world of change. Imaginative people 
must emerge who have an interest in processes and a desire to 
create new forms. If schools of management are to meet these 
needs, they must provide future managers with a knowledge of 
the methods and processes of professional management and an 
understanding of the complex and evolving social system within 
which they will apply this knowledge. Thus, the challenge is in 
developing competence in the application of professional skills 
to the solution of the external as well as the internal problems 
of organizations. 

The primary objective of the graduate and undergraduate man- 
agement programs at Boston College is to provide a broad profes- 
sional education that will prepare the student for important 
management positions in business and in other institutions. In 
the development of persons who will assume significant profes- 
sional responsibilities, it is absolutely essential that each student 
gain both an appreciation for the ethical and moral dimension of 
decision making and an understanding of the Jesuit tradition in 
this area. A manager is viewed as a person who makes significant 
decisions and assumes the leadership responsibility for the ex- 
ecution of these decisions. Toward this end, the undergraduate 
program of study is designed to accomplish the following goals: 

1. Liberal Education: To provide students with a broad ed- 
ucational foundation of course coverage in arts and sci- 
ences, including English, mathematics, social sciences, 
history and the natural sciences. 

2. Professional Core: To develop in students a sound back- 
ground knowledge of the concepts, processes, institutions, 
relationships, and methods of modern management. 

3. Advanced Professional Interest: To allow students the 
opportunity to explore areas of professional interest 
through advanced course work in specific professional 
disciplines. 

4. Personal Development: To encourage students to develop, 
as individuals, those attitudes, skills, and commitments 
which best equip them to perform effectively as respon- 
sible leaders in business and in society. 

Requirements for the Degree 

The basic requirement for the Bachelor of Science degree is the 
completion of thirty-eight (38) one-semester, three-credit courses 
distributed over eight semesters of four academic years with a 
cumulative average of at least a C- (1.5). Within these thirty- 
eight courses is the core curriculum of fourteen liberal arts 
courses required of all students. The remaining twenty-four 



School of Management / 127 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



courses include sixteen management courses, two liberal arts 
electives and six free electives. 

Students are encouraged to use these electives to maintain or 
develop skills and interest in other areas such as foreign language, 
music, art etc. Foreign language study is particularly recom- 
mended; for example, the Department of Germanic Studies offers 
the course Gm 005-006 (Elementary Business German) for per- 
sons without previous experience with the German language who 
wish to begin to develop competence with this language (For 
details see Germanic Studies). 

The School of Management offers its undergraduates an inte- 
grated concentration in Management and Psychology. Persons 
interested in this concentration should contact the coordinator 
through the office of the undergraduate dean early in their fresh- 
man year. 

In some cases it is possible to arrange an equivalent major in 
Arts & Sciences by utilizing free electives. Students interested in 
completing a major in the College of Arts & Sciences should 
contact both the School of Management Associate Dean and the 
Department Chairperson. 

Students may not take University Core or School of Manage- 
ment Courses on a Pass/Fail basis; the only courses that are ac- 
ceptable for Pass/Fail are the Arts & Sciences free electives. 

The University Core is customarily taken as shown, as is the 
School of Management core. However, you should arrange your 
courses in sequence according to your field of concentration in 
consultation with your faculty advisor. 

Freshman Year 

English English 

Mathematics* Mathematics* 

Natural Science Natural Science 

History History 

PI 070 Phil, of Person I PI 070 Phil, of Person II 



Sophomore Year 



Ma 021 Financial Accounting 

Ec 131 Princ. of 

Economics-Micro 

A & S Elective** 

Ec 151 Statistics 

Theology 



Ma 022 Managerial Accounting 

Ec 132 Princ. of 

Economics-Macro 

A & S Elective** 

Mc 022 Computer Science 

Theology 



Junior Year 



Arts & Sciences elective 
Mf 021 Basic Finance 
Mk 021 Basic Marketing 
Mq 021 Management & 

Operations 
Mj 021 Introduction to Law 



Arts & Sciences elective 

Concentration 

Elective 

Elective 

Mb 021 Organizational 
Behavior 



Concentration 
Concentration 

Elective 
Elective 



Senior Year 

Concentration 

Md 099 Admin. Strategy & 

Policy 

Elective 

Elective 



With the exception of Md 099 Administrative Strategy & Policy, 
all management core courses must be completed by the end of 
the Junior year. As of September 1982, Seniors must have taken 
management core courses in the first three years. Accounting, 
statistics and economics should be taken by the end of the second 
year. 

The prerequisite for individual courses must be followed: 

Example-Financial Accounting Ma 021 before Managerial 
Accounting Ma 022; Ec 132 Principles of Econom- 
ics-Macro, Ec 151 Statistics and Ma 022 Managerial 
Accounting before Management & Operations Mq 
021. 

*Mt 174-Mt 175-Calculus for Management Science 
**Graduate before 1985 must take a Social Science course 

Common Body of Knowledge 

To provide the student with the common body of knowledge in 
business and administration, the programs include as part of their 
course of instruction the following: 



128 / School of Management 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



(a) a background of the economic and legal environments of 
business enterprise along with consideration of the social 
and political influences on business; 

(b) a basic understanding of the concepts and methods of 
accounting, quantitative methods, and information sys- 
tems; 

(c) a study of organization theory, interpersonal relation- 
ships, control and motivation systems, and communi- 
cations; 

(d) a background of the concepts, processes, and institutions 
in marketing and distribution, production, and financing 
functions of business enterprise; 

(e) a study of administrative processes under conditions of 
uncertainty including integrating analysis and policy de- 
termination at the overall management level. 

Academic Regulations 

Requirement for Good Standing 

In order to remain in good standing, a student must maintain a 
cumulative average of C- (1.5) as the satisfactory standard of 
scholarship, and have passed at least nine courses by the begin- 
ning of the second year, nineteen courses by the beginning of the 
third year and twenty-nine courses by the beginning of the fourth 
year. 

Failure to maintain this requirement will result in the student 
being placed on warning or probation, or being required to with- 
draw from the College. 

Course Deficiency 

A student who fails or withdraws from a course(s) or who takes 
less than the normal course load must make up the course(s) by 
attending summer school at Boston College or at another ap- 
proved college. Credit for such a course will not be granted unless 
the consent of the Associate Dean has been previously obtained. 
Three deficiencies (i.e., grades of W or F) or more in one academic 
year will result in dismissal from the College. 

Class Attendance 

Attendance at class is obligatory for all freshmen except those on 
the Dean's List. The administrative penalty for those with exces- 
sive absences is loss of credit for the course(s) involved. Further 
details concerning this rule will be found in the UNIVERSITY 
STUDENT GUIDE. Attendance in class for the other years is free 
and is left to the maturity and responsibility of the individual 
student: however, certain courses because of their special ap- 
proach require attendance, e.g. Md 099 — Administrative Strategy 
and Policy. 

In cases of prolonged absence due to illness or injury, a student 
or a member of his or her family should communicate with the 
Dean of Students and the Associate Dean of the School of Man- 
agement as soon as the prospect of prolonged or extended ab- 
sences becomes clear. The academic arrangements for the student's 
return to classes should be made with the Associate Dean of the 
School as soon as the student's health and other circumstances 
permit. 

Eligibility of Student Activities 

A student who is not in good standing either through a low cu- 
mulative average or by incurring failures and— or withdrawals, or 
who has passed fewer than four courses in the preceding semester, 
is automatically ineligible to participate in any extracurricular 
activities or in intercollegiate sports. 

Normal Program 

The normal program for freshmen, sophomores, and juniors is 
five courses each semester; for seniors four or five courses. 

Acceleration 

After being in residence for at least three semesters, and at least 
two full semesters prior to the proposed date of graduation, stu- 
dents may apply to the Dean of the School of Management to 
accelerate their degree program by one or two semesters. Students 
must present a minimum cumulative average of 3.0; they will be 



considered for approval only for exceptional reasons. The Uni- 
versity policies regarding accelerated programs, once approved, 
also require that any courses intended for acceleration must be 
taken at Boston College and must be authorized by the Associate 
Dean. Students transferring into Boston College with first semes- 
ter sophomore status or above are not eligible to accelerate their 
program of study. Any overload courses taken for credit will carry 
an extra tuition charge beginning September 1, 1981. A sixth 
course may be taken by students who have a cumulative average 
of B (3.0) and have the permission of the Associate Dean. Course 
credit will not be granted for students who do not have permission 
prior to registering for the course. Full time status for a student 
in any class requires enrollment in at least four courses each 
semester. 

Leave of Absence 

A student in good standing who desires to interrupt the normal 
progress of an academic program and wishes to resume studies 
at Boston College within a year may petition for a leave of absence. 
The process begins in the Office of the University Registrar. A 
leave of absence will not normally be granted to students who 
expect to do full time academic work at another institution, and 
will be extended for no more than one year, although petition for 
renewal is possible. 

Academic Integrity 

All students are expected to maintain the highest standards of 
personal integrity and honor in all their academic activities. Stu- 
dents who violate these standards are subject to disciplinary ac- 
tion by a professor, and may be subject to further action after a 
hearing by a board of peers and faculty. 

An Academic Integrity Board composed of both students and 
faculty investigates breaches of academic integrity (cheating, pla- 
giarism, etc.) referred by either students or faculty. After review- 
ing a case the Board makes a recommendation to the Associate 
Dean who can then take disciplinary action which may include 
suspension or expulsion. 

Degree with Honors 

Latin honors accompanying the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science are awarded in three grades according to the 
cumulative average attained by full-time attendance: Summa cum 
Laude, with Highest Honors, is awarded to students with a cu- 
mulative average of 3.667 or above; Magna cum Laude, with High 
Honors, to those with averages between 3.333 and 3.666; and 
Cum Laude, with Honors, to those with averages between 2.900 
and 3.332. 

Beginning with the Class of 1983 Honors will be awarded on 
a percentage basis. The degree will be awarded Summa cum 
Laude to the top 4.5% of the graduating class, Magna cum Laude 
to the next 9.5% and Cum Laude to the next 15%. 



Special Programs 

Management Honors Program 

To be considered for admission to the Honors Program, a student 
must have a Dean's List average for Freshman year, exhibit an 
ability to work well with others and desire to develop abilities 
by being involved in the functions associated with the Program. 
Throughout the Program a participant is expected to remain on 
the Dean's List and actively participate in planning and executing 
Program functions. 

The Honors Program has as its goal the development of profes- 
sional skills and leadership ability in the organizational world. 
A brochure giving more complete details regarding requirements 
and activities will be mailed on request. 

Pre-Professional Studies for Law 

Although there is no prescribed academic program which can be 
considered "pre-legal," the School of Management does provide 
an opportunity for the student to develop analytical powers and 



School of Management / 129 

ACCOUNTING 



a capacity in both oral and written expression in a number of 
"Case-type" courses. 

Of prime importance to the pre-law student, then, is the de- 
velopment of clear reasoning power, a facility for accurate expres- 
sion, a mature balance of judgment, and the ability to appreciate 
the moral, social and economic problems related to the admin- 
istration of justice in modern society. 

Through its curriculum, which blends the liberal arts with 
professional course work, the School of Management offers an 
ideal opportunity to develop these qualities. In addition, the 
School of Management staff includes a highly-competent pre- 
legal advisory counseling group. Together, these provide an ex- 
cellent preparation for the legally-oriented student. 



Loyola Lectures 

Throughout the academic year Boston College is the host to na- 
tional and international authorities not only in business, but in 
government, literature, religion, the arts, science, human relations 
and law. The university, the colleges and departments sponsor 
the visits of the renowned in these fields to give the students an 
added dimension to their collegiate careers. The School of Man- 
agement is the sponsor of the Loyola Lecture Series. Each year 
two national or international figures are invited to the campus 
for the purpose of stimulating provocative discussions on na- 
tional and international affairs. Recent speakers included Father 
Umberto Almazan, Dr. Tran Van Chuong, F. Lee Bailey, Ralph 
Nader, Jack Anderson, Senator Paul Tsongas, and Ambassador 
Andrew Young. 

Senior Awards and Honors 

The Reverend Thomas I. Gasson, S.J. Award: A Gold Medal 
founded by Boston College for general excellence in all courses 
of study during the four years in the School of Management. 
The Patrick A. O'Connell Marketing Award: A Gold Medal 
founded by Patrick O'Connell for excellence in all courses studied 
in the major field of Marketing. 

The Patrick A. O'Connell Finance Award: A Gold Medal founded 
by Patrick O'Connell for excellence in all courses studied in the 
major field of Finance. 

The John B. Atkinson Award: Founded by Mr. John B. Atkinson 
for excellence in all courses studied in the major field of Man- 
agement. 

The Reverend Charles W. Lyons, S.J. Award: A Gold Medal 
founded by Boston College for excellence in all courses studied 
in the major field of Accounting. 

The Arthur Anderson Award: In Computer Science. Awarded to 
the student who, by the vote of the Department Faculty, has dem- 
onstrated outstanding achievement in the major field of Computer 
Science. 

The James D. Sullivan, S.J. Award: A gift of the Student Senate 
of the School of Management is awarded to the senior, who, in 
the judgment of a faculty committee, is outstanding in character 
and achievement. 

The Matthew J. Toomey Award: Is presented annually by Mr. 
Knowles L. Toomey to honor the outstanding student in the 
School of Management Honors Program. 

The Wall Street Journal Award: A Gold Medal and a year's sub- 
scription to the Wall Street Journal given to the senior, who, in 
the opinion of the faculty committee, has demonstrated outstand- 
ing achievement in his or her major field of study. 
The William 1. Lee Accounting Award: An annual award given 
by the North Shore Region of the Greater Boston Association of 
Accountants to a high-ranking senior accounting major. 
The Raymond J. Aherne Award: Given annually to the outstand- 
ing senior majoring in Finance. The nominees are voted upon by 
the seniors in the Academy and final selection is made by a 
student-appointed faculty interviewing committee. The award 
represents the recognition of one's own peers as being a leader 
in his or her field. 

The James E. Shaw Memorial Award: This award is to a senior 
in the School of Management who has been accepted to a rec- 
ognized Law School. This student demonstrates a strong personal 
interest in the welfare of fellow students. The recipient is selected 
by a faculty committee of the School of Management. 



The Hutchinson Memorial Award: A plaque presented by the 
American Marketing Association, Boston Chapter, to the out- 
standing marketing student for academic and extra-curricular 
achievement. 



Accounting 



Faculty 

Professor Arthur L. Glynn, M.B.A., Boston University; J.D., Boston 
College Law School; C.P.A., Massachusetts 

Associate Professor Louis Corsini, B.S.B.A., M.B.A., Boston College 
Law School; Ph.D., Louisiana State University; C.P.A., Massa- 
chusetts 

Associate Professor Christopher J. Flynn, A.B, Boston College; 
A.M., Boston University; L.L.B., Boston College 

Associate Professor Ronald Pawliczek, B.B.A., Siena College; 
M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Associate Professor Frederick J. Zappala, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment 

B.S.B.A., Boston College; M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania; 
C.P.A., Massachusetts 

Assistant Professor J. Stephen Collins, B.A., Boston College; M.S., 
Northeastern University; Ph.D., Boston College; C.P.A., Massa- 
chusetts 

Assistant Professor William A. DeMalia, B.S.B.A., M.B.A., Boston 
College; C.P.A., Massachusetts 

Assistant Professor Stanley J. Dmohowski, B.S.B.A., Boston Col- 
lege; M.B.A., New York University; C.P.A., Massachusetts 

Assistant Professor James F. Waegelein, B.S., B.A., Boston College; 
M.S.B.A., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University; C.P.A. Colorado 

Lecturer William J. Home; B.A., A.M., Boston College 

Lecturer Robert M. Turner, B.S., LeMoyne College, M.S., Syracuse 
University; M.B.A., Boston College 

Lecturer John L. Zimka, B.A., A.M., New York University 



Program Description 

The curriculum for students who concentrate in Accounting is 
designed to provide them with a broad understanding of theory 
and the techniques of Accounting. The comprehensive training 
offered in Accounting is aimed at preparing students for positions 
in public accounting, and business or government, such as that 
of controller, internal auditor or budget director. 

Courses Required for a Concentration 



Intermediate Accounting I 
Intermediate Accounting II 
Cost Accounting 



Junior Year 

Ma 251 
Ma 252 
Ma 355 

Senior Year 

Ma 604 Financial Accounting Theory 

C.P.A. Recommendations 

For those students who intend to practice as Certified Public 
Accountants, a special program should be followed to meet the 
requirements of the particular state statute covering C.P.A. Some 
states require a total of 120 credit hours even though degree re- 
quirements may be less for particular educational institutions. 
The recommended program is as follows: 

Junior Year: 

Ma 251 Intermediate Accounting I 
Ma 252 Intermediate Accounting II 



130 / School of Management 

ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES 



Ma 355 Cost Accounting 

Senior Year: 

Ma 361 Advanced Accounting I 

Mj 151 C.P.A. Law 

Ma 363 Tax Accounting 

Ma 364 Auditing 

Ma 604 Financial Accounting Theory 

Ma 605 Computer Based Accounting Systems 



Course Offerings 



Ma 021 Financial Accounting Information Systems (F, S; 3, 3) 

This course deals with the formal financial information process- 
ing system, the end products of which are the various financial 
statements presented to investors, creditors, and other parties. 
Accounting concepts, standards and procedures are studied from 
the standpoint of providing the tools for subsequent analysis of 
the financial statements. The Department 

Ma 022 Managerial Accounting (F, S; 3) 

This course stresses the usefulness of accounting data as it relates 
to the managerial decision-making process, within the broad ob- 
jectives of planning, control and analysis. Among the multi-fac- 
eted areas of study are financial statement analysis, managerial 
accounting fundamentals including product costing and cost- 
volume-profit relationships, budgeting for both profit planning 
and capital outlays, and standard cost analysis. The Department 

Ma 251 Intermediate Accounting I (F; 3) 

Emphasis is placed on the application of accounting theory to 
practice problems in order to develop financial statements of 
proper form and content. The relationship between various fi- 
nancial statements is constantly reaffirmed. Asset items of the 
balance sheet are treated comprehensively. The Department 

Ma 252 Intermediate Accounting II (S; 3) 

Emphasis is placed on liabilities, leases, pensions and stock- 
holder's equity items. In addition the statement of change in fi- 
nancial position is also studied. The Department 

Ma 355 Cost Accounting (F, S; 3) 

The control aspects of material, labor and overhead acounting are 
stressed. The course covers such areas as job and process costs, 
standard costs, direct costing, marketing costs, costs in decision- 
making, capital budgeting and profit planning. 

Stanley Dmohowski 

Ma 361 Advanced Accounting (F; 3) 

This course includes accounting problems involved in the prep- 
aration of consolidated financial statements and in home and 
branch office relationships. Mergers and pooling problems are 
stressed. Special problems in fund and budgetary accounting for 
government entities are covered. The Department 

Ma 362 Advanced Topics (S; 3) 

The purpose of this course is to present to the student a number 
of special problem areas not covered in other courses. Topics 
such as accounting for partnerships, not-for-profit organizations, 
foreign exchange and the activities of multi-national corporations 
are covered. In addition, special emphasis will be directed to- 
wards presenting the issues and challenges which the accounting 
profession is presently addressing. The Department 

Ma 363 Tax Accounting (F, S; 3) 

This course considers the Massachusetts and Federal Income Tax 
Laws, with applications to individuals, partnerships, fiduciaries 
and corporations. An intensive series of practical problems cov- 
ering concrete situations illustrates the meanings of the laws. 
Consideration is given to the economic and historic viewpoints. 
A study is made of federal estate, gift and excise laws and state 
inheritance and excise tax laws. William A. DeMalia 

Arthur L. Glynn 

Ma 364 Auditing (F, S; 3) 

This course presents both the theory and the procedure of au- 
diting. The subjects covered include various types of audits, the 
preparation of working papers and reports, the relationship with 
the client and professional ethics. The materials used are practice 



sets, problems and the actual books of business organizations that 
have ceased operations. The course offers an opportunity to be- 
come acquainted with various classes of enterprise and provides 
a test under conditions which correspond to those met in practice. 
The student receives individual instruction on assignments. 

William A. DeMalia 
James F. Waegeiein 

Ma 399 Research Seminar (F, S; 3) 

Research is carried on under the guidance of members of the 
Accounting Department. The focus of the course is on investi- 
gations in the field of accounting and related subjects. 

Ma 604 Financial Accounting Theory (S; 3) 

This course will review generally accepted accounting principles 
currently in effect. This will include the Accounting Research 
Bulletins, the Opinions and Statements of the Accounting Prin- 
ciples Board and the Statements of the Financial Accounting 
Standards Board. The students will also do a comparative study 
of normative theories in order to comprehend the possible alter- 
natives and the limitations of normative theories. The objectives 
of the course are twofold: first to prepare the student for the 
theory portion of the CPA examination, and second, to provide 
the student with a general frame of reference from which he can 
critically evaluate the codified body of generally accepted ac- 
counting principles. Louis S. Corsini 

Robert M. Turner 
Frederick /. Zappala 

Ma 605 Computer Based Accounting Systems (F, S; 3, 3) 

The growing use of computer-based information systems presents 
a number of challenges to the auditor as well as to management 
and systems personnel. The computer also gives the auditor a 
strong opportunity to become a complete auditor. Now that the 
increasing importance of computer systems to the auditor and 
accounting in general has been recognized by both academicians 
and practitioners, the need for a course that is supported by com- 
prehensive material on systems analysis and computer control 
and auditing has become imperative. 

This course is concerned with systems analysis and computer 
audit and control, and covers those auditing techniques that are 
applicable to computer based information systems. The student 
is required to actually perform an EDP audit and system analysis 
in a business. In this course, the student applies computer audit 
techniques (with guidance) and produces an EDP Audit Review 
document which is presented to management. This course as- 
sumes a minimal knowledge of computers (basic computer sci- 
ence) and auditing or permission of instructor. 

James F. Waegeiein 



Administrative Sciences 



Faculty 



Professor Walter H. Klein, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Pitts- 
burgh 

Professor John E. Van Tassel, B.S.B.A., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

Associate Professor Mary L. Hatten, A.B., Rosary College; M.S., 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

Associate Professor David C. Murphy, Chairman of the Department 
B.B.S., New Hampshire College; M.B.A., D.B.A., Indiana Univer- 
sity 

Associate Professor Joseph A. Raelin, A.B., Ed. M., Tufts University; 
C.A.G.S., Boston University; Ph.D., SUNY, Buffalo 

Assistant Professor Robert M. Brown, A.B., Franklin & Marshall 
College; M.B.A., Northeastern University; Ph.D., Univ. of Wis- 
consin 

Assistant Professor James F. Halpin, S.J., A.B., A.M., M.S., Boston 
College; S.T.L., Colegio de San Francisco de Borja: Barcelona; 
S.T.D., Gregorian University 



School of Management / 131 

BUSINESS LAW 



Assistant Professor Thomas P. Vaughan, B.S., M.B.A., Wayne State 
University; Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Assistant Professor Robert D. Wright, A.E.E., Northeastern Uni- 
versity; M.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; M.Eng., M.B.A., 
D.B.A. (cand.) Boston University 

Instructor R. Jeffery Ellis, B.S., University of Nottingham; M.S., 
Salford University; Ph.D. (cand.) Cranfield Institute of Technol- 
ogy 



Program Description 

The Administrative Sciences Department offers programs in 
Quantitative Analysis and Strategic Management. A concentra- 
tion in Quantitative Analysis is offered at both the graduate and 
undergraduate levels in conjunction with the Computer Sciences 
Department. Interested students should refer to Management: 
Quantitative Analysis. A graduate concentration in Strategic 
Management is offered which includes, for those so inclined, an 
option in Public Management. Undergraduates interested in pur- 
suing studies in Strategic Management may do so within the 
General Management concentration. 



Course Offerings 

Md 099 Administrative Strategy and Policy (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite; Successful completion of SOM professional core 
and senior standing. 

This course focuses on the study of the administrative process 
as organizational guidance from a top-management perspective. 
This involves the nature, formulation, and implementation of 
strategy and policy; the necessity of, and problems resulting from 
functional integration and human interaction; the planning, or- 
ganizing, and controlling processes; the evaluation of risks and 
alternatives; and administrative philosophies and ideologies. 
Considerable emphasis is placed on student participation through 
class discussion, and on the development of administrative 
skills. The Department 

Md 122 Managing Complex Organizations (F, S; 3) 

Managing is deciding. This course utilizes decision making as 
the integrative, conceptual framework for an introductory study 
of management. The modern organization is viewed as a complex 
information-decision system in which decision making repre- 
sents the focus of the manager's activity. Various historical ap- 
proaches to management, such as the classical, behavioral, and 
quantitative, are explored and integrated within this framework. 
Careful attention is given to various modes for making different 
kinds of managerial decisions and the analytical, human, and 
conceptual skills needed to make these decisions. Ample oppor- 
tunity is provided to apply the knowledge and develop the skills 
by way of case analysis, problem solving and decision making 
exercises, role playing, and individual and group 
projects. Walter H. Klein 

Md 160 Ethical Issues in Management (F, S; 3) 

This course will deal with ethical theory within a management 
context. The subject matter and the format of the course are de- 
signed to 1) stimulate the moral imagination, 2) recognize moral 
issues, and 3) develop analytical skills and the ability to use them 
in the moral decision-making process. In keeping with these ob- 
jectives, our approach will be part lecture and part discussion, 
with attention to both general theory and concrete cases. Areas 
to be covered comprise: the American business system, social 
value systems, individual and organizational behavior, conven- 
tional morality and ethical relativism, ethical theories, theories 
of economic justice, corporate responsibility, the limits of law, 
self-regulation and government regulation, institutionalizing so- 
cial responsibility, ethics and the policy process. 

James HaJpin, S.J. 

Md 299 Independent Study (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing, consent of department chairperson. 



The student works under the direction of an individual professor. 
By arrangement The Department 

Md 390 Small Business Management Strategy (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and satisfactory completion of the 
SOM professional core. 

The purpose of this course is to provide a viable alternative for 
those students who are likely to enter small or new businesses 
rather than those of a large or established nature. It emphasizes 
a major consulting project (selected by the student from a varied 
group) for a small firm or organization (profit or non profit), which 
is done in small group teams working with the instructor. Class 
meetings are held in each of the major functional areas to trans- 
pose what has been learned in the functions to the needs of small 
business. Class discussions of team findings are held in the latter 
part of the course to help the teams prepare for their verbal and 
written reports to their respective clients. Thomas W. Dunn 

Md 608 Management of Health Care (S; 3) 

This course introduces the student to a variety of management 
issues in the health care delivery area, by allowing the student 
to grapple with some real problem situations. The case method 
is used in combination with discussions to give the student this 
exposure. The areas covered can be divided into two broad cat- 
egories: health care system design issues and health care system 
operating control issues. Design issues include: need identifica- 
tion, financing systems, cost, quantity, accessibility (volume) goal 
specification, capacity decisions, service or program design and 
organization structure. Operating control issues include: resource 
allocation (budgetary) systems, quality control systems, cost con- 
trol systems. Thomas Vaughan 



Business Law 



Faculty 

Professor William B. Hickey, A.B., J.D., Boston College; M.Ed., 
Boston State Teachers College; LL.M., Boston University Law 
School 

Professor Frank J. Parker, B.S., College of the Holy Cross; J.D., 
Fordham University Law School; M.Th., Louvain University 

Professor David P. Twomey, B.S., J.D., Boston College; M.B.A., 
University of Massachusetts 

Associate Professor Vincent A. Harrington, A.B., M.B.A., Harvard 
University; J.D., Boston College 

Associate Professor Alfred E. Sutherland, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment 
B.S., A.M., J.D., Boston College 



Course Offerings 



Mj 021 Law I-Introduction to Law and Legal Process (F, S; 3) 

This course is an introduction to law, legal institutions and the 
legal environment of business. The United States Constitution, 
the federal and state court systems, statutes and regulations of 
administrative agencies are carefully studied. The course in- 
cludes an examination of the substantive law of contracts. 

The Department 

Mj 022 Law II-Business Law (S; 3) 

The course examines the Uniform Commercial Code with respect 
to the law of sales, commercial paper, creditors rights and secured 
transactions. Partnerships, corporations, bankruptcy, real prop- 
erty, wills, trusts, estates, personal property, bailments and 
agency are included. 



132 / School of Management 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 



Recommended for Accounting students. Required for those tak- 
ing the C.P.A. Examination in New York. Matthew Kameron 

Edward Ryan 
David P. Twomey 

Mj 147 Constitutional Law (F, S; 3) 

A study of the United States Constitution, the nature of the Court, 
the history of the Court, the members of the Court, and the role 
of the Court in shaping social, economic and political policy. 

William B. Hickey 

Mj 148 International Law (F, S; 3) 

The purpose of the course is to provide the student with an un- 
derstanding of the basic legal relationships among individuals, 
business enterprises and governments in the world community. 
The course examines the nature and historical sources of inter- 
national law, treaties, international organizations including the 
United Nations and the European Economic Community, and the 
rights and duties of diplomatic and consular officials. 

Alfred E. Sutherland 

Mj 152 Labor Law (F, S; 3) 

Introductory considerations pertaining to organized labor in our 
society. Examination of the processes for establishing collective 
bargaining, including representation and bargaining status under 
the National Labor Relations Act. Class discussion of the "lead- 
ing" cases relevant to the legal controls which are applicable to 
intra-union relationships and the legal limitations on employer 
and union economic pressures. Students are required to submit 
a research paper on a current Labor Law topic. 

David P. Twomey 

Mj 154 Insurance (F, S; 3) 

This course is designed to indicate how insurance is used in 
modern business and in one's personal life to meet the economic 
demands made upon the thinking man in our society. One-third 
of the course deals with life insurance, one-third in property 
insurance and one-third in liability insurance. It is taught from 
the point of view of a potential buyer who is trying to solve a 
given problem, and who realizes that the answer may lie in in- 
surance, mutual funds, etc. Vincent A. Harrington 

Edward Ryan 

Mj 156 Real Estate (F, S; 3) 

This course is designed to show the student the opportunities in 
real estate as an investment, to show how a potential investor 
should buy, hold and sell real estate and other property. Tax 
aspects and legal aspects are stressed as well as the "how-to-do- 
it" approach. It is compared and contrasted with other invest- 
ments such as mutual funds, dollar-averaging, etc. 

Vincent A. Harrington 
Richard /. Monahan 
Frank /. Parker, S.J. 

Mj 161 Corporate and S.E.C. Law (F, S; 3) 

The course examines the role of the corporation in modern society 
and the factors affecting choice of the form of business organi- 
zation including corporations, partnerships and trusts, corporate 
governance and the fiduciary obligations of directors and officers. 
The developing body of federal securities law is explored, in- 
cluding analysis and evaluation of the Securities and Exchange 
Commission and its regulations. The professional and legal re- 
sponsibilities of accountants, particularly with regard to financial 
and registration statements are critically examined. 

Alfred E. Sutherland 

Mj 625 Law and Policy in International Trade (F; 3) 

The course considers the legal and economic aspects of various 
international organizations including the World Bank, the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund and the General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade (GATT). The greatly expanded role of the Office of the 
United States Trade Representative, which under the recently 
enacted Multilaterial Trade Act is charged with the responsibility 
for coordinating trade policy among all governmental depart- 
ments and agencies, will be examined closely. United States con- 
stitutional and administrative law aspects relating to regulation 



of trade will be analyzed in the economic and political setting of 
the world community. Alfred E. Sutherland 

Mj 631 African Business Environment (F; 3) 

Area of survey of political, economic, physical, legal, cultural, 
and religious influences which affect the ability of foreign cor- 
porations to do business in Africa. North-South dialogue, devel- 
opment questions, nationalization, strategic concerns, economic 
treaties, and import-export regulations will be examined. 

Frank /. Parker, S.J. 



Computer Science 



Faculty 

Professor Richard B. Maffei, B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Associate Professor James Gips, Chairman of the Department 
S.B., M.I.T.; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Associate Professor Peter Kugel, A.B., Colgate University; Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

Associate Professor C. Peter Olivieri, B.S.B.A., M.B.A., Boston Col- 
lege; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Associate Professor Michael W. Rubin, B.S., M.S., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Assistant Professor Michael R. Dunlavey, B.S., M.S., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Assistant Professor William T. Griffith, B.S., St. Joseph's College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Boston College 

Instructor Ruth Palaszewski, A.B., Hofstra University; A.M., Ph.D. 
(cand.), New York University 



Program Description 

The Computer Science curriculum is designed to provide inter- 
ested students with an opportunity to advance their knowledge, 
understanding and skills in a rapidly advancing discipline. In 
recent years the computer and its associated technology has found 
its way into many realms of human endeavor and has even begun 
to shape those endeavors. The computer's seeming omnipresence 
makes it worthy of study, but equally important is the observation 
that computer processes are, in great measure, fundamentally 
new. The unique potential of computer techniques has created 
a social need for computer applications, systems and services. In 
addition, complex decision problems in a variety of organiza- 
tional settings lend themselves nicely to quantitative methods 
rendered practical through the power of information processing 
technology. 

The Computer Science Department at Boston College has three 
principal functions. First, it provides introductory computer sci- 
ence courses to all segments of the university with special atten- 
tion given to the School of Management Core Curriculum. Second, 
it provides advanced courses in Computer Science to those stu- 
dents interested either in entering the computer field upon grad- 
uation or in pursuing advanced degrees in Computer Science. 
Third, in association with the Administrative Sciences Depart- 
ment it provides courses in Quantitative Analysis. 

A major in Computer Science is offered jointly with the Math- 
ematics Department through the College of Arts and Sciences. A 
description of the major appears in the Arts and Sciences section 
of this Bulletin. Students in the College of Arts and Sciences also 
have the option of taking the courses required for a concentration 
in Computer Science and having a notation to that effect appear 
on their transcript. Interested students should see the Chairman 
of the Computer Science Department. 

Courses Required for a Concentration 

Mc 350 Structured Programming 
Mc 365 Systems Analysis 
Mc 400 Business Systems 



School of Management / 133 



Mc 452 Computer Organization and Assembly Language 
The student may take these courses at any time if individual 
prerequisites have been fulfilled. Students are encouraged to dis- 
tribute their courses in this area so that each semester might 
provide for a sampling of other areas in the University. As Mc 
350 Structured Programming is a prerequisite for most other 
courses, it should generally be taken no later than the first se- 
mester of the Junior Year. Those students desiring preparation in 
greater depth, as might be required if further graduate training is 
anticipated or if programming is a definite career choice, should 
plan on taking at least two further electives in the area. 

Elective Offerings 

Mc 404 Machines and Languages 

Mc 406 Data Structures 

Mc 455 LISP 

Mc 456 Artificial Intelligence 

Mc 460 Compilers 

Mc 470 Operating Systems 

Mc 480 Topics in Computer Science 
Related courses are also offered in Accounting (Ma 605), in 
Quantitative Analysis (for example, Mq 250, Mq 604, Mq 605, 
Mq 606), and in the Mathematics Department (Mt 460, Mt 461, 
Mt 462, Mt 463). 



Course Offerings 

Mc 022 Introduction to Computer Science (F, S; 3) 

How can we use the computer to solve problems? What types of 
problems are amenable to a computer solution? This course is an 
introduction to the structure, concepts, and use of computers. 
The student will learn how to program in the BASIC language. 
Emphasis will be placed on learning what a computer can and 
ought to do and on how to make effective use of the computer. 
There are no prerequisites. Students with prior programming ex- 
perience should enroll in Mc 350. The Department 

Mc 299 Independent Study (F, S; 3) 

The student works with an individual professor on a mutually 
agreed upon topic. An oral and written presentation is required. 
By arrangement The Department 

Mc 350 Structured Programming (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mc 022 or some programming experience 
The main purpose of this course is to develop a systematic, well- 
disciplined approach to computer programming. Students will 
also learn how to use the PASCAL language. The Department 

Mc 365 Systems Analysis (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Some facility and experience with at least one com- 
puter language. 

This course teaches the student how to analyze the structure and 
flow of information in organizations like businesses and hospitals 
as well as how the computer itself as a system structures and 
processes information on the instruction and circuit level. Ac- 
cessing methods and disk processing will be presented. 

Peter Olivieri 

William Griffith 

Ruth PaJaszewski 

Mc 400 Business Systems (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mc 350 or permission of the instructor. 
This course will cover the concepts of selecting storage media 
(such as tape or disk files) and the structure, design and orga- 
nization of files. The course material will include sequential, 
direct, and indexed sequential file organization. COBOL (Com- 
mon Business Oriented Language) is the most widely used pro- 
gramming language in the business community. This course offers 
the student the opportunity to become proficient in this language. 

Peter Kugel 

Peter Olivieri 

Ruth PaJaszewski 

Mc 404 Machines and Languages (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mc 022 or equivalent. 

This course is an introduction to the theory of computation and 



its application to the design of computers and computer lan- 
guages. 

The theory of computation studies the scope and limits of the 
computing process. This course will deal with some of the things 
that computers can and cannot do from a strictly theoretical point 
of view. It will focus on the kinds of languages computers can 
and cannot understand. The aim of the course is to enable the 
student to understand the theoretical limits of computers and 
enough about the structures that have been developed by theorists 
so that he or she can deal with some of the basic issues in the 
design of computers and computer languages. James Gips 

Peter Kugel 

Mc 406 Data Structures (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mc 350 or equivalent 

This course provides the necessary framework for more effective 
and efficient usage of modern storage structures by concentrating 
on the logical design of such structures and not on any particular 
physical implementation of such structures. The course begins 
with a consideration of the basic static storage structures which 
are commonly implemented in algebraic programming languages. 
Next we consider structures which have limited potential for 
change on their periphery (i.e., stacks, queues and deques). This 
is followed by a more extended treatment of dynamic structures 
(i.e., trees, graphs and linked lists). The final part of the course 
involves consideration of what might be termed applications: 
sorting, strings, data searching, file structures, storage allocations, 
garbage collections and data management. Michael Dunlavey 

Peter Kugel 

Mc 452 Computer Organization and Assembly Language (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mc 350 or equivalent 

In order to make effective use of the computer, it is important to 
understand its basic organization and structure and how it ac- 
tually follows instructions. This course is designed to introduce 
the student to basic computer programming. A particular com- 
puter and assembly language will be used extensively to illustrate 
the concepts being taught and to give the student ample assembly 
language programming experience. Various computers with dif- 
ferent types of organization and instructions will be compared. 
Additionally, the functions and characteristics of important kinds 
of systems software will be described. James Gips 

Michael McFarland, S.J. 

Mc 455 LISP (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mc 452 

LISP is a high level language that is used extensively in Artificial 
Intelligence and natural language understanding programs. The 
language is based on recursive functions. The student will gain 
an understanding of the language and some of its 
applications. Michael Dunlavey 

Mc 456 Artificial Intelligence (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mc455 

The field of Artificial Intelligence is concerned with programming 
computers to do things that require intelligence when done by 
people. The student will learn about programs that hold conver- 
sations in English, play chess, solve problems, and about recent 
efforts to construct computer-controlled robots. Emphasis will be 
placed on the programming techniques underlying these systems 
and on the question of whether or not there are limits on the 
intellectual capabilities that can be programmed into a 
computer. The Department 

Mc 460 Compilers (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mc 350 and Mc 452 

Compilers are computer programs that analyze programs written 
in high-level languages (e.g., PASCAL, COBOL, BASIC) and trans- 
late them into lower-level forms amenable to execution by com- 
puter hardware. This course has three main objectives: (1 ) to teach 
students how to write compilers, (2) to teach students how to 
write large programs (a compiler being a good example of a large 
program with many parts), and (3) to teach students what is in- 
volved in the design of computer languages so that they may more 
readily learn (or design) new ones. Michael Dunlavey 

James Gips 
Peter Kugel 



134 / School of Management 

ECONOMICS 



Mc 470 Operating Systems (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mc 350 and Mc 452 

A vital part of every computer is the operating system. The op- 
erating system is a large program that, among other tasks, controls 
access to the computer, determines who gets service next, stores 
and retrieves files, and allocates resources such as primary mem- 
ory, disk space, and input-output equipment. This course is an 
introduction to the design and implementation of operating 
systems. Michael Dunlavey 

William Griffith 

Mc 480 Topics in Computer Science (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Mc 350 

An in-depth treatment of some area of Computer Science not 
covered by the regular curriculum. A different topic will be of- 
fered each term: check with department for details. 

Topics will be drawn from faculty research areas, current de- 
velopments in the field, and student interests. Possible subjects 
include: programming languages (theory, design, comparative 
study, or history); structure and management of large program- 
ming projects; data base management systems; microcomputers; 
advanced topics in computer organization; graphics; natural lan- 
guage processing; programming with symbolic expressions. 

This course may be taken up to two times for credit. 



May be offered either term. 



The Department 



Mc. 670 (PI 670) (Sc 670) Technology and Culture (F; 3) or (S; 3) 

This course examines the philosophical, psychological, social, 
legal and economic sources, impact and direction of modern tech- 
nology. Attention will focus upon the effects on the individual, 
society in general and on organizations. The student should ex- 
pect to raise and analyze significant issues in these areas. A per- 
son taking this course should have at least an elementary 
understanding of some aspect of applied modern technology (e.g. 
computers, mass communications, etc.), and an interest in where 
society is and is going in virtue of this burgeoning 
technology. William Griffith 



Economics 



The major in Economics provides a critical examination of how 
the economic system works in the United States and throughout 
the world. Required courses in micro theory and macro theory 
build on the analytical foundations developed in Principles of 
Economics, and electives permit further study in a wide range of 
fields. Electives include money and banking, economic devel- 
opment, international trade and finance, labor, economic history, 
consumer economics, capital theory, econometrics, industrial 
organization, Soviet economics, comparative systems, political 
economics, and public finance. The major provides a general 
background which is useful to those planning careers in law, 
government service, or business as well as those planning careers 
as professional economists. The required courses in micro and 
macro are offered both semesters and may be taken in either order. 
Course descriptions for Economics can be found in the Arts 
and Sciences section of this Bulletin. 

Junior Year 

First Semester 

Microeconomic Theory 201 or 203 
Second Semester 

Macroeconomic Theory 202 or 204 
Senior Year 

First Semester 

Economics Elective 
Second Semester 

Economics Elective 



Finance 

Faculty 

Professor Walter T. Greaney, Jr., Chairman of the Department 
A.B., Boston College; J.D., LL.M., Boston University; A.M., Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

Professor Mya Maung, A.B., Rangoon University; A.M., University 
of Michigan; Ph.D., Catholic University 

Professor Jerry A. Viscione, B.S., Boston College; M.B.A., A.M., 
Ph.D., Boston University 

Associate Professor George A. Aragon, A.B., University of Califor- 
nia at Los Angeles; D.B.A., Harvard University 

Associate Professor John G. Preston, B.A.Sc, University of British 
Columbia; M.B.A., Western Ontario; D.B.A., Harvard University 

Associate Professor Hassan Tehranian, B.S., Iranian Institute of 
Advanced Accounting; B.M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama 

Assistant Professor Gail Y. Chu, B.S., University of Pennsylvania; 
M.B.A., University of California; Ph.D., University of Washington 

Assistant Professor Ruben C. Trevino, B.S., M.A., Instituto Tecno- 
logico de Monterrey; M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 
University of Alabama 

Lecturer Matthew L. Herz, B.S., Tufts University; M.B.A., Boston 
College; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Lecturer Lawrence H. Marino, B.S., Boston College; M.B.A., Boston 
University 

Lecturer Paul Slaggert, B.B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.B.A., 
Boston College 



Program Description 

Financial management involves efficiently managing the flow of 
funds within an economic entity. Such flows include the raising 
or sourcing of funds and the allocating or investing of funds on 
both a short-term and a long-term basis. The manager must be 
aware of decision-making tools and techniques that may be used 
given the resources and constraints of the entity involved, and 
also of the general economic environment in which it must op- 
erate. Financial management thus has wide application, as all 
economic entities — households, private business firms, non-profit 
institutions, and government agencies — must deal with continual 
funds flows. The management problems associated with each of 
these sectors define areas of finance that are popularly known as 
personal financial management, corporate financial management, 
not-for-profit financial management, and government or public 
finance. 

The course offerings of the Finance Department are designed 
to prepare students for the financial management role in any of 
these sectors. Because of the School of Management's traditional 
orientation towards large private firms, corporate financial man- 
agement is emphasized in the program designed for concentra- 
tors, but the tools, techniques, and analytical processes taught 
are applicable to all sectors. 

The decision-making process within the firm is covered in 
courses on corporate financial analysis, management and policy, 
portfolio analysis, tax factors, and other courses focussing on 
financial management in specialized sectors, such as government, 
education, or multinational firms. The financial environment in 
which the manager must operate is covered in courses on finan- 
cial institutions, financial instruments, and money and capital 
markets. A balance of both types of courses is required for a 
concentrator in the area. In all courses, students are expected to 
develop and apply the analytical skills involved in identifying 
problems, proposing and evaluating alternative solutions, and 
ultimately making a management decision. 

Career opportunities in finance are varied, ranging from line 
management functions to advisory staff positions, and cutting 
across all industrial groups. Although any industrial classifica- 
tion scheme is somewhat arbitrary, it may be useful to identify 



School of Management / 135 

FINANCE 



four general sectors in which the typical financial manager may 
find himself/herself. 

— Financial Institutions, which predominantly include com- 
mercial banks, but also savings banks and credit unions, and 
the wide variety of non-bank financial intermediaries such as 
insurance companies, pension funds, investment banks, and 
brokerage houses. 

— Private Manufacturing Firms, which run the gamut from small 
to large, and from standardized products to high-technology 
systems. 

— Private Service Firms, which include areas directly related to 
the finance function itself, such as public accounting and fi- 
nancial consulting, as well as areas which incorporate finance 
as a necessary function of their operations, such as retailing, 
tourism, or entertainment. 

— Not-for-Profit or Government Firms/Agencies, which primar- 
ily include entities providing services in health care, educa- 
tion, social services, and the arts. 

While all areas share a broad common denominator in terms of 
the skills, tasks, and functions involved in the management role, 
students are encouraged to talk to people active in any specific 
areas of interest in order to gain an insight into the unique op- 
portunities or challenges of any given field. The Finance De- 
partment attempts to facilitate such a student-professional 
interchange through an alumni advisement system which sup- 
plements normal faculty advisement. 

The Undergraduate Concentration in Finance 

The undergraduate finance concentrator is required to take a 
minimum of four finance courses beyond the basic finance core 
requirement. 

1. Financial Analysis and Management — Mf 127 
(prerequisite Mf 021 — Basic Finance) 

2. Financial Policy— Mf 225 

(prerequisite Mf 127 — Financial Analysis and Management) 

3. Markets, Instruments and Institutions-select one of the fol- 
lowing three courses: 

Money and Capital Markets — Mf 132 
Investments — Mf 151 

Management of Commercial Banks and Other Financial 
Institutions— Mf 159 
All with prerequisites of Mf 021 — Basic Finance. 

4. Any one other elective offered by the Finance Department; 
includes those courses not selected to meet the "Markets, 
Instruments and Institutions" requirement above, and: 

Portfolio Analysis and Management — Mf 152 
(recommended prerequisite Mf 151 — Investments) 
Financial Management of Governments and Other Related 
Public and Private Institutions — Mf 165 
Tax Factors in Business Decisions — Mf 167 
Finance Seminar — Mf 205 

(prerequisites of Mf 127 — Financial Analysis and Manage- 
ment, "Markets, Instruments, and Institutions" require- 
ment, and permission of the instructor.) 
Financial Management of Multinational Corporations — 
Mf 230 

Individual Directed Study — Mf 299 

(prerequisites of Senior status, and permission of super- 
vising faculty member and Department Chairperson) 
All with prerequisites of Mf 021 — Basic Finance, and additional 
prerequisites as indicated. 
For scheduling purposes, these requirements and their associated 
prerequisites necessitate the following courses to be taken in se- 
quential order. 

Basic Finance— Mf. 021 (CORE) 

Financial Analysis and Management — Mf 127 

Financial Policy — Mf 225 

The remaining requirements and any additional electives may 
be taken at any time after the successful completion of Basic 
Finance — Mf 021 (noting the special prerequisites associated with 



Portfolio Analysis and Management — Mf 152, Finance Seminar — 
Mf 205, and Individual Directed Study— Mf 299). 

Course Offerings 

Mf 021 Basic Finance (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Ma 021 

This is a course designed to survey the areas of corporate financial 
management, money and capital markets, and financial institu- 
tions. Corporate finance topics include the time value of money, 
the cost of capital, capital budgeting, financial analysis and work- 
ing capital management. Financial markets and institutions cov- 
ers the role of financial intermediaries and instruments as they 
function in a complex economic system. The teaching method 
will be a combination of lectures, problems, and case 
discussions. Gail Chu 

Bob Foley 

Larry Marino 

Mya Maung 

John G. Preston 

Ruben Trevino 

Mf 127 Financial Analysis and Management (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mf 021 

This course is designed to teach the techniques of financial anal- 
ysis and the management of a firm's sources and uses of funds. 
Topics treated intensively include financial statement analysis, 
techniques of financial forecasting, operating and financial le- 
verage, working capital management, capital budgeting, leasing 
and long term finance. The teaching method will be a combina- 
tion of lectures, problems and cases. Hassan Tehranian 

Mf 132 Money and Capital Markets (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mf 021 

This course is designed to teach the students the nature, roles 
and functions of financial markets and other institutions in the 
context of funds flows. It deals with the process of funds transfers 
(financial intermediation) of various financial institutions his- 
torically and analytically. Mya Maung 

Mf 151 Investments (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mf 021 

The course introduces the student to the process of investing in 
financial securities. The functioning of financial markets and the 
analyzing of various investment media receive primary attention. 
Subsidiary topics include setting investment objectives, sources 
of investment information, and portfolio theory. Each student is 
responsible for a written analysis of the securities of a major 
company. To be announced 

Mf 152 Portfolio Analysis and Management (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Mf 021; (Investments is strongly recommended) Mf 
151 

This course acquaints the student with the conceptual and tech- 
nical foundations of modern investment analysis. The principal 
emphasis of the course will be the application of these analytical 
tools to the management and evaluation of investment activity 
in a wide variety of settings, including portfolios of financial 
institutions, personal investment choices of individuals and asset 
selection by non-financial corporations. Use of the computer and 
case method may be required. Ruben Trevino 

Mf 159 Management of Commercial Banks and Other Financial 
Institutions (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mf 021 

This course is intended to provide the student with an introduc- 
tion to and a perception of the management of banks and other 
key financial institutions. The factors that influence the manage- 
ment of these institutions will be examined. Flow of Funds state- 
ments and the effects of interest rate changes will be studied. 
Specific topics that are covered are the management of bank re- 
serves, and the cash position and portfolio and loan management 
for the several types of financial firms such as Commercial Banks, 
Savings Banks, Insurance Companies, Pension Funds, Mutual 
Funds, Credit Unions and Investment Banks. 

Walter T. Greaney 
Mya Maung 



136 / School of Management 

GENERAL MANAGEMENT 



Mf 167 Tax Factors in Business Decisions (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mf 021 

This course examines the impact of the federal, state and local 
tax structures on the making of business decisions. Corporations, 
Partnerships. Sole Proprietorships and other business forms are 
looked at in detail. Specific topics that are covered are income 
taxes, capital gains and losses, contributions, capital structures, 
dividend policy, distributions of property, reorganizations, estate 
and gift taxes, and tax planning. The teaching method will be a 
combination of lectures, problems, and case discussions. 

Walter T. Greaney 

Mf 225 Financial Policy (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mf 127 

The initial phase (approximately first 40%) of this course extends 
Mf 127's treatment of a firm's investment, financing, and dividend 
decisions. Topics treated intensively include the valuation of the 
firm, risk analysis in capital budgeting, capital structure theory 
and policy, and dividends. Although some cases may be em- 
ployed during this segment, emphasis will be on lectures, read- 
ings, and problems. The second phase will deal almost exclusively 
with cases designed to provide an opportunity to: (1) apply the 
principles covered during the first segment; (2) integrate the 
firm's financial decisions; (3) demonstrate the relationship be- 
tween corporate finance and other subfields of finance; 
(4) introduce the notion of financial strategy; (5) show the re- 
lationship between finance and other management 
functions. Jerry A. Viscione 

Mf 230 Financial Management of Multinational Corporations 

(S;3) 

Prerequisite: Mf 021 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with financial 
management problems and opportunities in a multinational cor- 
poration. Topics such as sources and uses of funds, working cap- 
ital management, and capital budgeting are all discussed in light 
of such multinational complexities as foreign exchange risk, mul- 
tiple legal and political jurisdictions, and differential government 
and environmental constraints. The financial instruments of trade 
are also studied. Lecture, class discussion, problems, and cases 
will be employed. Gail Y. Chu 

Mf 299 Individual Directed Study (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty member and the Depart- 
ment Chairperson to a student of Senior status in the school of 
Management. 

This is an opportunity for students interested in independent 
study to engage in a one-to-one relationship with a faculty mem- 
ber of the Finance Department. This course is only available to 
the student who has demonstrated (1) an extremely strong interest 
in some particular area of Finance, and (2) a strong self-motivation 
and self-discipline in previous studies. It is expected that the 
student will present the results of research to a faculty group of 
the Department towards the end of the semester. The permission 
of the Department Chairperson is to be obtained when the indi- 
vidual faculty member has agreed to direct the student's research 
project. The Department 



General Management 

A brief statement of the purpose of management education might 
be to improve the levels of management performance in all sectors 
of society so that man can live a better and safer life and a more 
self-fulfilling one. Within this broad framework the purpose of 
the General Management concentration is to provide an avenue 
for the pursuit of cross-disciplinary studies of management, 
within the context of an integrated and rigorous curriculum. 

Students might decide to choose to concentrate in this area for 
either of the following reasons: 

1. A desire to pursue a cross-disciplinary approach to Man- 
agement. 



2. A desire to pursue key management courses in sufficient 

depth to attain proper coverage of required subject matter 

generally included in M.B.A. core courses. 

For additional information or assistance, contact the General 

Management Coordinator through the office of the undergraduate 

dean. 



Courses Required for a Concentration 



OR 



Track B. Choose the required 
course from each of 
four areas: 



Track A. Choose two areas. 
Within each area 
there is one 
required course 
and the option for 
one elective. 

Required Course Electives 

Accounting 

Ma 251 Intermediate None 

Accounting 
Ma 252 Intermediate 

Accounting 

Computer Science 

Mc 350 Structured Mc 365 Systems Analysis 

Programming Mc 400 Business Systems 

Mc 452 Computer 

Organization 
Finance 



Mf 127 Financial Analysis 
and Management 



Mf 132 Money and Capital 

Markets 
Mf 151 Investments 
Mf 159 Management of 

Commercial Banks 
and Other Financial 
Institutions 
Mf 167 Tax Factors in 

Business Decisons 
Mf 225 Financial Policy 
Mf 230 Financial 

Management of 
Multinational 
Corporations 
Marketing 

Mk 253 Basic Marketing Mk 152 Consumer Behavior 

Research Mk 154 Communication and 

or Promotion 

Mk 256 Applied Marketing Mk 155 Sales Management 

Management Mk 158 Product Planning 

and Strategy 

Organization Studies/Human Resources Management 

Mb 110 Human Resources Mb 116 Industrial Relations 

Management Mb 119 Interpersonal 

Communication in 
Organization 

Mb 120 Employment Policy 

Mb 123 Management of 

Conflict and Power 

Mb 127 Leadership 

Mb 135 Career and Human 
Resources Planning 

Mb 247 Design of Work and 
Organization 

Mb 248 Evolution of Work 

Mb 313 Personnel & 

Organizational 
Research 

Mb 364 Collective 
Bargaining 

Mb 601 Comparative 

Industrial Relations 

Mb 603 Human 

Consequences of 
Managerial Control 
Systems 



School of Management / 137 

HONORS PROGRAM 



Operations Analysis* 

Mq 250 Decision Analysis Mq 370 Operations Analysis 

Mq 375 Systems 

Management 
Mq 608 Cases in 

Management 
Science 

Strategic Management* 

Md 160 Ethical Issues in Md 122 Managing Complex 

Management Organizations 

Md 390 Small Business 
Management 
Strategy 

Quantitative Analysis* 

Mq 250 Decision Analysis Mq 384 Applied Statistics 

Mq 604 Operations Research 
Mq 605 Simulation Methods 

* Students considering these options should discuss partic- 
ular course selections with appropriate department fac- 
ulty. 



Honors Program 



Course Offerings 

Mh 125 Communications and Conference Management (F; 3) 

Prerequisites: Open to School of Management Honors Program 
sophomores, or by permission of the Director. 
This course acquaints the student with public speaking and the 
operation of meetings. It includes the preparation of speeches to 
be presented in front of small groups. Closed circuit television 
is utilized so that each student obtains audience criticism as well 
as immediate feedback on performance in front of groups. In the 
conference management section, the student is expected to obtain 
a basic knowledge of task division, committee assignments and 
agenda setting. Daniel McCue 

Mh 128 Management Writing Skills (S; 3) 

An advanced course in written communication for students who 
have already mastered the basic skills. The course aims to develop 
clarity, brevity, and vigor in expression through the writing and 
editing of letters, memoranda, and reports. Modern examples and 
practical application will be stressed. 

Mh 199 Thesis (F, S; 3) 

Open to School of Management Honors Program Seniors, or by 
permission of the Dean and Director. The honors thesis consists 
of a project normally done under the direction of a faculty member 
from the department in which the student has an area of con- 
centration. In general it follows the format of a thesis for which 
data are collected, analyzed and a substantive report is written. 
The topic and format of the project are mutually agreed upon by 
the student, advisor and the Director of the Honors Program. 
By arrangement 



Marketing 



Faculty 

Professor Joseph D. O'Brien, A.B., College of the Holy Cross; 
M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Saint Louis University 

Associate Professor Joseph Gartner, B.S., University of Connecti- 
cut; M.S., University of New Hampshire; Ph.D., Iowa State Uni- 
versity 

Associate Professor John T. Hasenjaeger, B.S., Bradley University; 
M.S., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Associate Professor Robert D. Hisrich, A.B., DePauw University; 
M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 



Associate Professor Raymond F. Keyes, A.B., Colby College; M.B.A., 
Boston College 

Associate Professor Richard P. Nielsen, B.S., M.A., University of 
Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Associate Professor Michael P. Peters, Chairman of the Department 
B.S., M.B.A., Northeastern University; Ph.D., University of Massa- 
chusetts 

Assistant Professor Nora M. Ganim Barnes, A.B., Rhode Island 
College; A.M., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., University of 
Connecticut 

Assistant Professor Cynthia F. Frey, B.B.A., Western Michigan 
University; M.B.A., Ph.D. University of Michigan 

Instructor Frank J. Franzak, B.B., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
& State University; M.B.A., University of Maryland 

Lecturer Eugene Bronstein, A.B., Dartmouth College; M.B.A., Har- 
vard University 



Program Description 

Marketing is a system of business activities designed to plan, 
price, promote and distribute want-satisfying goods and services 
to present and potential household consumers or industrial users. 

Today most nations, regardless of their stage of economic de- 
velopment or their widely different political philosophies, are 
recognizing the importance of marketing. However, even though 
it has world wide applications, marketing has been developed to 
its highest level in the United States. 

Increased competition, complex government regulations, scarc- 
ity of resources, rising costs and inflation will provide significant 
challenges in the future for marketing managers. As management 
faces these challenges, the need for broadening and expanding 
marketing practices to non-profit organizations, hospitals, gov- 
ernment agencies, and other industries will be necessitated. 

Typical career tracks in marketing are product management, 
sales, market research, retail management, channel management, 
advertising and promotion, and international marketing. These 
career paths encompass a wide range of industries as well as non- 
profit and government organizations. 

The approach used to study marketing is analytical and ex- 
perimental. Special projects, case studies, lectures and guest 
speakers are interwoven within a decision-making framework so 
that the student is provided with a pragmatic understanding of 
the major tools and guides required of today's Marketing Manager. 

Courses Required for a Concentration 

Mk 253 Basic Marketing Research 

Mk 256 Applied Marketing Management 

Both required courses should be taken in senior year. Two 
courses selected from remaining offerings: 

Mk 028 International Business Management 

Mk 111 Distribution Channels 

Mk 112 Social Issues in Marketing 

Mk 152 Consumer Behavior 

Mk 153 Retailing 

Mk 154 Communication and Promotion 

Mk 155 Sales Management 

Mk 157 Personal Selling 

Mk 158 Product Planning and Strategy 

Mk 160 Merchandise Management 

Mk 205 Quantitative Marketing 

Mk 299 Individual Study 



Course Offerings 

Mk 021 Basic Marketing (F, S; 3) 

This course will present an overview of the full range of activities 
involved in marketing. Attention will be given to the appraisal 
and diagnosis, organization and planning, and action and control 
of all elements of marketing. Specifically, the functions of the 



138 / School of Management 

MARKETING 



product and service mix, distribution mix, communication mix, 
and pricing mix will be considered. Frank Franzak 

Cynthia Frey 

Joseph Gartner 

John T. Hasenjaeger 

Robert D. Hisrich 

Raymond Keyes 

Richard Nielsen 

Joseph D. O'Brien 

Michael Peters 

Mk 028 International Business Management (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mk 021 

International Business Management is an in-depth analysis of the 
environment in which international business decisions are made. 
This is not a functionally oriented course that has its major em- 
phasis in the analysis and solution of specific functional prob- 
lems. Rather, a major focus of the course is to create sensitivity 
within the student to the problems and issues created because 
modern business is conducted in an international environment. 
A sensitivity to this field of knowledge is useful for students in 
almost all areas of specialization. One would be hard pressed to 
identify a major segment of our society that is not affected by the 
international transfer of men, resources, capital and knowledge. 
International Business Management calls upon a multiplicity of 
disciplines to create a broad understanding of the subject matter. 
Concepts from Economics, Political Science, Anthropology, So- 
ciology and Management are integrated into the course. 

Gail Chu 

Mk 111 Distribution Channels (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mk 021 

This course is intended to look at the broad subject of distribution. 
It will view the field of distribution from the economic, func- 
tional, institutional and behavioral perspectives. The content 
here covers the traditional subjects of transportation, logistics, 
warehousing and system design, along with some of the contem- 
porary issues such as behavioral dimensions, channel manage- 
ment and new methods of distribution. In presentation a balance 
is kept between theory, applications and analysis. 

Mk 112 Social Issues in Marketing (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mk 021 

This course is directed to provide a balanced and well structured 
treatment of the social issues which face the field of marketing. 
The social goals and role of marketing are appraised, dealing both 
with the broad issues and with specific examples and applica- 
tions. The systems approach to these decision areas is emphasized 
along with an interdisciplinary view on the application of mar- 
keting techniques, both in public agencies and nonprofit insti- 
tutions. Classic issues such as social efficiency, fair competition, 
and consumer sovereignty are covered along with the more con- 
temporary issues such as product safety, warranties and service, 
deceptive selling practices, consumerism, the ghetto consumer, 
truth in lending, misleading advertising and environment pro- 
tection problems. John T. Hasenjaeger 

Mk 152 Consumer Behavior (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mk 021 

This course is designed to integrate the disciplines of psychology, 
anthropology, and sociology with marketing to explain, under- 
stand and predict consumer decisions. This is achieved by ex- 
ploring both the theoretical and practical implications of (1) 
individual behavioral variables such as motivation, learning, per- 
ception, personality and attitudes (2) group influences such as 
family, culture, social class and reference group behavior and (3) 
consumer decision processes such as cognitive dissonance, brand 
loyalty and new product adoption and risk reduction. 

Nora Ganim Barnes 
Joseph Gartner 
Michael Peters 

Mk 153 Retailing (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mk 021 

This introductory course is intended for students exploring the 
possibility of retailing as a career choice. It is suitable as an elec- 
tive for a School of Management student, whether a marketing 
major or not, and is equally applicable to a non-School of Man- 
agement student who wishes to gain some insight into the nature. 



scope and management of retailing. There are no prerequisite 
courses in marketing, accounting or economics. Concepts from 
these areas are integrated into the course at a non-technical level. 
The course covers basic topics in the history, structure and en- 
vironment of retailing, merchandising, buying, control and ac- 
counting, pricing, promotion, organization, management, and 
retailing as a career. A text, lectures, outside speakers, possibly 
some programmed learning aids and case materials will provide 
the basic instructional materials. Eugene Bronstein 

Mk 154 Communication and Promotion (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mk 021 

This course deals with the communication function in marketing. 
It begins with an explanation of the nature of promotion, its role 
in the marketing mix, the environmental context in which it is 
carried out, and the behavioral concepts which shape promo- 
tional decisions. The second section of the course examines the 
effects of mass communication and personal communication in 
influencing attitudes, and the role of communication in the dif- 
fusion and adoption of innovations. The third section deals with 
concepts of market segmentation and the selection of appropriate 
recipients for promotional efforts. The final part of the course 
examines the tools of the promotional mix in terms of the con- 
ceptual frameworks previously developed. It covers messages, 
mass media, personal selling, and ancillary promotional mate- 
rials. The course employs a text, additional readings, lectures, 
discussions and case material. While this course is primarily fo- 
cused on the needs of marketing majors, it is suitable as an elective 
for any School of Management student, and for other students 
interested in communication and the persuasive process. The 
fundamental material is as applicable to the needs of non-profit 
institutions as it is to commercial enterprises. Cynthia Frey 

Frank Franzak 

Mk 155 Sales Management (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mk 021 

Sales Management: the planning, direction, and control of selling 
activities, including the recruiting, selection, training, supervi- 
sion, and compensation of the sales force, establishment of goals 
and measuring performance; coordinating sales activities with 
advertising and special forms of promotion and other depart- 
ments of business; and providing aids for distributors. 

Joseph D. O'Brien 

Mk 157 Personal Selling (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mk 021 

This course is an introduction to the most significant promotional 
force of all — personal selling. Both principles and techniques of 
selling will be covered. Although no magic formulas, recipes, 
etc., will be provided, it will cover in some detail the programs 
and practices developed by successful salespersons. This course 
is suitable for students whose main interest is marketing, for those 
who train salespersons, and for those who look forward to selling 
careers with established firms or on their own. 

Joseph D. O'Brien 

Mk 158 Product Planning and Strategy (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mk 021 

With the growing concern over the success of new products an 
intense effort is being employed by marketers to establish more 
effective new product development and management strategies 
from the point of a new product's conception to its death after 
a successful life span. Using lectures and case studies this course 
will focus on the process of conceiving new products, developing 
an effective organization and designing and implementing effec- 
tive marketing strategies and policies over the course of the prod- 
uct life cycle. Class material will provide the student with insight 
in new product development across a wide variety of 
industries. Robert Hisrich 

Michael Peters 

Mk 160 Merchandise Management (S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Mk 021; Mk 153 

This course examines the philosophy, concepts, and techniques 
underlying the planning and control of sales and inventories in 
retail stores. Pricing, inventory analysis and the planning and 



School of Management / 139 

ORGANIZATION STUDIES— HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 



control of sales and inventories in dollars and units will be 
discussed. Eugene Bronstein 

Mk 253 Basic Marketing Research (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mk 021 

This course covers the fundamentals of scientific investigation 
in solving marketing problems. Each step is outlined and carefully 
presented — from the initial planning and investigation to the final 
conclusion and recommendation phase. This procedure requires 
a working knowledge of both quantitative and qualitative analysis 
and seeks to equip students with the correct methodology for 
solving marketing problems. This course is for seniors only. 

Nora Ganim Barnes 
John T. Hasenjaeger 

Mk 256 Applied Marketing Management (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mk 021 

In this course, students are exposed to realistic marketing prob- 
lems and situations. Case studies and live examples provide the 
opportunity for marketing concepts and tools to be applied in 
practice. The point of view taken is that of a marketing manager 
responsible for planning, analysis, execution and control of a 
complete marketing program. Within this overall framework of 
marketing strategy, students are encouraged to apply the analyt- 
ical approach to problem solving, as the basis for making sound 
decisions. This course is for seniors only. Cynthia Frey 

fiaymond Keyes 
Bichard Nielsen 

Mk 299 Individual Study (F, S; 3) 

An individual study course offered by the department requiring 
permission of the Chairperson. 



Organization Studies — 
Human Resources 
Management 



Faculty 

Associate Professor Jean M. Bartunek, R.S.C.J., A.B., Maryville Col- 
lege; A.M., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago Circle 

Associate Professor James L. Bowditch, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment 

A.B., Yale University; A.M., Western Michigan University; Ph.D., 
Purdue University 

Associate Professor Dalmar Fisher, B.S., Northwestern University; 
M.B.A., Boston College; D.B.A., Harvard University 

Associate Professor John W. Lewis, III, Coordinator, General Man- 
agement Concentration, 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve 
University 

Assistant Professor Davis E. Dyer, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Assistant Professor Judith Gordon, A.B., Brandeis University; 
M.Ed., Boston University; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Lecturer Alan P. Thayer, B.S., U.S. Military Academy; M.B.A., 
Harvard University 



Program Description 

There is a growing need for knowledge and skills relating to the 
management of human resources within organizations in every 
sector of our society. The Human Resources Management curric- 
ulum has applications in organizations of any type: industrial, 
educational, government, health care, financial institutions, and 
the like. The program is designed to meet the needs of a variety 
of students, including: (a) those who wish to concentrate in Per- 



sonnel or in Industrial Relations and ultimately assume career 
positions in these fields; (b) those who wish to become better 
managers through an increased awareness of personnel manage- 
ment systems, individual and interpersonal effectiveness, orga- 
nizational improvement, and related organizational issues; and 
(c) those who wish to go on to graduate study in Human Re- 
sources, Industrial Relations, Law, Management, and related 
fields. 

For those who wish to concentrate in Human Resources Man- 
agement, there are two options, Personnel and Industrial Rela- 
tions. In both cases, the concentration is completed by taking four 
courses beyond what is required in the School of Management 
common body of knowledge, which includes Mb 021 Introduc- 
tion to Behavior in Organizations. Both options require Mb 110 
Personnel Management as a first course in the concentration. 

The Personnel Option 

The Personnel Option addresses those human resources issues 
facing the organization regarding recruitment and selection of 
personnel, integrating employees into the organization, devel- 
oping managerial and employee potential, and maintaining and 
improving the effectiveness of the work force. Such functions as 
staffing, training, job and organization design, management de- 
velopment, benefit programs, manpower forecasting and plan- 
ning, and the diagnosis and remedy of organizational problems 
are covered. The Personnel Option prepares persons for entry 
level positions leading toward upper level positions in personnel 
administration, human relations, and organization development. 

The Industrial Relations Option 

The Industrial Relations Option stresses the human resource is- 
sues facing the organization which emerge from the wider society. 
The focus is on the study of the worker who belongs both to the 
labor force internal to the organization and to the labor force 
external to the organization. This collective view involves the 
study of current laws, regulations and institutions which shape 
the ways in which people interact with the organization; the study 
of how the internal market is structured and how workers organ- 
ize to obtain more favorable terms of employment; and the pro- 
cesses by which workers move in and out of the labor market. 
This Option prepares persons for entry level positions such as 
manager of industrial relations and director of manpower plan- 
ning. 

Courses Required for a Concentration 

Mb 021 Organizational Behavior 

(May be used to satisfy University Social Science Core 
except for students in the School of Management (re- 
quired course) 

Mb 110 Human Resources Management 

(Required for all concentrators in Human Resources 
Management) (All other courses require Mb 021 as pre- 
requisite except Mb 119, Mb 124 and Mb 135) 

Personnel Option 

Mb 313 Personnel and Organizational Research (new) 

(Required for Personnel Option, usually after 1 or more 
electives) 



Industrial Relations Option 

Mb 116 Industrial Relations 

(Bequired for Industrial Relations Option) 



Electives 

Mb 119 

Mb 120 
Mb 123 
Mb 127 
Mb 135 



Interpersonal Communication in Organization 

(May be used to satisfy University Social Science Core) 

Employment Policy** 

Management of Conflict and Power 

Leadership* 

Career and Human Resource Planning 



140 / School of Management 

ORGANIZATION STUDIES— HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 



Mj 152 Labor Law** 

Mb 247 Design of Work and Organizations* 

Mb 248 The Evolution of Work* 

Ec 340 Labor Economics** 

Mb 364 Collective Bargaining** 

Mb 601 Comparative Industrial Relations 
(permission of instructor) 

Mb 603 Human Consequences of Managerial Control Systems 
(permission of instructor) 

Mb 644 Labor-Management Relations 

Notes: *Mb 119, Mbl23, Mb 135, Mb 247, Mb 248 recom- 
mended for Personnel Option 
**Mb 120, Mj 152, Ec 340, Mb 364 recommended for 
Industrial Relations Option 

Mb 116 and Mb 313 may also be taken as electives. 
Either Mb 364 or Mb 664 may be taken for elective 
credit, but not both courses. 



Course Offerings 



Mb 021 Organizational Behavior (F, S; 3) 

Organizations do not behave — people within them do. As an in- 
troduction to the study of human behavior in organizations, this 
course aims at increasing the student's awareness and under- 
standing of individual, interpersonal, group and organizational 
events as well as increasing ability to explain and influence such 
events. The course deals with a body of concepts which are ap- 
plicable to institutions of any type. A central thrust of these con- 
cepts concerns the ways in which institutions can become more 
adaptive and change oriented. The course is designed to help the 
student understand and influence the human groups and orga- 
nizations to which he or she currently belongs and with which 
he or she will become involved in a later career. 

Selected in-class situational exercises, cases, readings, and or- 
ganizational simulations are used to amplify the central concepts 
in the areas of individual, group and inter-group behavior in 
organizations as well as organizational design, development and 
change. The Department 

Mb 110 Human Resources Management (F, S; 3) 

This course surveys techniques of modern personnel manage- 
ment from the points of view of both the manager and Personnel 
Director. Topics covered include recruitment, selection, inter- 
views, resume preparation, managerial evaluation and develop- 
ment, leadership and supervision, management-labor history and 
relations, wage and salary administration, fringe benefits and 
psychological testing. Pertinent laws dealing with labor discrim- 
ination, health and safety, pensions and working conditions will 
be covered. There are usually about 4 or 5 guest speakers on such 
topics as college recruitment, affirmative action, role of women 
executives, Social Security, organized labor, U.S. and state civil 
service career opportunities. Judith R. Gordon 

John W. Lewis III 

Mb 116 Industrial Relations (F; 3) 

This course provides an introduction to the key elements of the 
industrial relations system, the institutions, economic factors and 
public policy, and the ways in which they interact. The organi- 
zation of the labor market within the firm, the industry, occu- 
pations and the economy is explained. Theories of labor market 
operation are examined with reference to employer policies, col- 
lective bargaining and relevant public policies. The implications 
of current issues, including affirmative action, inflation, produc- 
tivity, unemployment and increasing international competition 
will be briefly reviewed, providing a basis for further exploration 
in elective courses. Joseph A. Raelin 

Mb 119 Interpersonal Communication in Organizations (F; 3) 

Managerial action takes place in one-to-one and small group sit- 
uations. This course will aim to increase students' personal and 
conceptual understanding of factors most relevant to managers 
in task-oriented communication settings. Topics will include in- 
terpersonal relationships, uses and mis-uses of language, group 
process diagnosis, nonverbal communication, and helping/coun- 
seling. Lectures, readings and case discussions will be combined 



with in-class exercises where major learning material will be gen- 
erated by participants themselves. Dalmar Fisher 

Mb 120 Employment Policy (S; 3) 

This course is an introduction to the broad range of practical 
policy and theoretical issues in manpower policy viewed from 
all levels, from the labor force participation of the individual, 
particular groups, and the training policies of private and public 
institutions. The goal is to develop an analytical framework for 
evaluating all elements of the employment training system, in 
terms of their particular and inter-related purposes. Particular 
attention is paid to the relationship between employment training 
programs and affirmative action. The approach is interdiscipli- 
nary: while emphasizing economic analysis, the contributions of 
cultural anthropology and political analysis are also 
utilized. The Department 

Mb 123 The Management of Conflict and Power (F, S; 3) 

This course provides students with an awareness of organiza- 
tional conflict and power, especially as these processes arise dur- 
ing the course of decision-making. Topics discussed include the 
causes and processes of organizational conflict, methods of 
achieving power in organizations, machiavellianism, different 
power strategies and their effects, and coalition formation. The 
course focuses on strategies of ethical and effective conflict man- 
agement and power distribution. 

Jean Bartunek 

Mb 127 Leadership (S; 3) 

This course is designed to acquaint the undergraduate student 
with the role and work of first level supervisors and managers 
within varied organizational settings, viewed from the perspec- 
tive of the incumbent in such roles. To augment in-class learning, 
each student will undertake a longitudinal study of a manager in 
action which he or she will arrange for individually. Contem- 
porary theories and empirical research on the practice of lead- 
ership will be examined and their implications explored in 
various ways. In-depth case studies of recognized leaders will be 
examined in the light of theory and research findings. 

Assessment of the student's own leadership and interpersonal 
styles will be made utilizing instruments of various kinds and 
the present and future implications explored. Situations will be 
created within the class to gauge the "feel" and impact of par- 
ticular styles in action. Emphasis in this aspect of the course, and 
the rest as well, will be on behavioral strategies which lead toward 
either effective or ineffective leader performance. 

John W. Lewis 

Mb 135 Career and Human Resource Planning (F; 3) 

This course provides an overview of career— life planning and 
career development issues within the broader, macro framework 
of manpower planning. It has two components. The first part is 
designed as a workshop experience to aid students in acquiring 
and perfecting career planning and job hunting skills. The course 
emphasizes four areas here: 1) self-assessment of needs, interests, 
abilities, skills, and experiences, 2) evaluation of the potential 
job market, 3) development of job hunting skills, and 4) assessment 
of other influences on career development. The second part of 
the course considers the issues of career and life planning, more 
from an organizational than from an individual perspective. The 
general framework of manpower planning is presented and spe- 
cific techniques are introduced. Course material will be presented 
using a variety of methods; lecture, discussion, case analysis, and 
hands-on experience with career planning and manpower plan- 
ning problems. James Bowditch 

Judith Gordon 

Mb 247 The Design of Work and Organizations (F; 3) 

Organizations have experienced significant changes in technol- 
ogy, environment, and personnel in the last decade. These 
changes have caused organizations to seek new ways of perform- 
ing work tasks and of organizing their human resources. This 
course is designed to 1) consider various ways of organizing work 
tasks and the variables that influence such design, 2) describe 
various organizational structures and the contingencies influenc- 
ing their effectiveness, and 3) discuss the role of human resource 
professionals in designing work and organizations. Course ma- 



School of Management / 141 

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 



terial will be presented using a variety of methods: lecture, dis- 
cussion, case analysis, and class problems. Davis Dwer 

Mb 248 The Evolution of Work (S; 3) 

This course will examine the evolution of work and its relation- 
ship to social and economic change from pre-industrial times to 
the present day. The course aims to show how the nature of work 
and occupational roles have changed over time and have varied 
across cultures. Its goal is to provide students with a sense of the 
ongoing evolution of the jobs and careers they will pursue. The 
course is divided into three parts considering the organization of 
traditional work, the transformation of work and management 
during the Industrial Revolution, and the nature of work in post- 
industrial society. Topics covered include patterns of rural and 
urban employment, the emergence of capitalist organization, in- 
dustrialization, the rise of large-scale enterprise and organized 
labor, and emerging changes in the American workplace with 
comparisons to the experiences of other developed 
countries. Davis Dyer 

Mb 299 Independent Study (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing, consent of department chairperson. 
The student works under the direction of an individual professor. 
By arrangement The Department 

Mb 313 Personnel & Organizational Research (S; 3) 

This course is designed to introduce the student to research meth- 
ods appropriate for solving practical problems in human resource 
management and organization development, and for interpreting 
economic data derived from macroeconomic sources. Practice in 
conducting research in organizational settings will be provided. 

Jean Bartunek 
James Bowditch 

Mb 364 Collective Bargaining (F; 3) 

Collective Bargaining is not only a process but an institution. 
From the former perspective, it involves the negotiation between 
representatives of organized workers and their employer(s) to 
determine wages, hours, rules, and working conditions. Collec- 
tive bargaining also refers, however, to an institutional structure 
dealing with the overall management of human resources in both 
private-sector and public-sector organizations. 

This course is designed to provide students with an introduc- 
tion to both the processes as well as the institutional framework 
of collective bargaining. Joseph A. Raelin 

Mb 601 Comparative Industrial Relations (S; 3) 

This course examines the industrial relations systems of selected 
European and Scandinavian countries with respect to the dom- 
inant characteristics of their collective bargaining institutions, 
the public policy framework and economic context within which 
they operate. Comparisons and contrasts with the United States 
focus on differences in the social, economic and political contexts 
and their significance for the organization and policies of Amer- 
ican collective bargaining institutions. The approach combines 
historical, social and economic analysis in a brief review of the 
origins of the labor movement in each country with collective 
bargaining case studies, discussed in the context of the current 
industrial relations environment. The Department 

Mb 603 Human Consequences of Managerial Control Systems 
(F, S; 3) 

Appropriate management information and control systems are 
essential in smoothly functioning organizations. All such sys- 
tems, whether computerized or manual, depend upon human 
beings for their input as well as later interpretation and use of 
their outputs. Careful analysis is required to discover ways in 
which human behavior is affected and in turn affects the oper- 
ation of information and control systems. Accountants, manage- 
ment scientists, personnel executives and others who develop 
control systems, whatever their intended use, need to understand 
the interaction between these systems and human behavior. The 
impact of a particular system is strongly influenced by the way 
that managers use the information the system provides. The thrust 
of this course is on how management information and control 



systems can be creatively designed and implemented in order to 
maximize both human and organizational effectiveness. 

The Department 

Mb 664 Labor-Management Relations (S; 3) 

This course critically reviews and appraises the development and 
impact of collective bargaining in the United States. Attention is 
given to environmental forces, including public policy as well as 
to the negotiation and administration of labor agreements and 
related issues. The Department 



Quantitative Analysis 



Program Description 

Quantitative Analysis is offered jointly by the Administrative 
Sciences Department and the Computer Science Department. The 
focus of the program is on the application of quantitative methods 
to operations management: the planning, controlling and deci- 
sion-making functions common to all productive organizations. 
By its very nature, this area serves as a linking pin to such func- 
tional areas as marketing finance, accounting, production, and 
human resources management. Indeed, the major approaches of 
quantitative anlysis have been successfully applied to, and have 
been of considerable influence in the development of, these tra- 
ditional managerial functions. For this reason, students concen- 
trating in one of these functional areas will find a second 
concentration in Quantitative Analysis to be especially valuable. 
The objectives of this program are: 

1. To develop formal analytic skills in defining, analyzing, 
and solving complex managerial problems. 

2. To gain appreciation for when and where to use the 
principal techniques of quantitative analysis, with the 
ability to apply them when the proper occasions arise. 

3. To enhance understanding of operations analysis within 
organizations along with a knowledge of the 
interrelationships between the traditional managerial 
functions. 

4. To provide understanding of systems management and 
the ability to apply systems thinking and approaches to 
managerial problems. 

An undergraduate concentration requires four courses beyond 
the introductory course Mq 021 Management and Operations. To 
fulfill the program objectives, a course in applications (Mq 250) 
is required and a second applications course (Mq 370) is strongly 
recommended. To provide the necessary technical expertise, at 
least one course must be taken in the basic disciplines of simu- 
lation, statistics or operations research. The concentration can be 
rounded out with the elective offerings in the area or with ad- 
ditional work in the basic disciplines. 
Required: 

Mq 250 Decision Analysis 
At least one of: 

Mq 384 Applied Statistics 
Mq 604 Operations Research 
Mq 605 Simulation Methods 
Strongly recommended: 

Mq 370 Operations Analysis 
Electives: 

Mq 299 Independent Study 

Mq 375 Systems Management 

Mq 606 Forecasting Techniques 

Mq 608 Cases in Management Science 



Course Offerings 

Mq 021 Management and Operations (F, S; 3) 

Prerequisites: Ec 131, Ec 132, Ec 151, Ma 022, and Mc 022 
This course serves as an introduction to general management and 
to operations management. The central focus is on the structure, 
behavior, and management of operating or productive systems. 
Operations management is what every organization does; it trans- 



142 / School of Management 

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 



forms human, physical, and technical resources into goods or 
services. Hence, every organization has a need to manage resource 
conversion effectively and efficiently. How effectively this is ac- 
complished depends upon the linkages between operating deci- 
sions and general management decisions, organizational strategies, 
and societal concerns abut productivity, inflation, quality of life, 
and quality of working life. The integration centers on decisions 
regarding demand forecasting, cost, scheduling, productivity, 
quality, customer service and satisfaction, energy conservation, 
return on investment, pollution abatement, quality of working 
life, product reliability, and technology transfer. 

The Department 

Mq 250 Decision Analysis (F; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mq 021 

This course is designed for students who desire to concentrate 
in Operations Analysis and others who seek to supplement their 
chosen major with study in quantitative analysis. The course 
covers a broad range of topics and focuses on the application of 
decision models. Since this course is intended for students of 
various backgrounds and management interests, it draws decision 
problems from operations, finance, marketing, accounting, and 
personnel management. Decision Analysis is intended to improve 
the student's rigour in management decision making and to ac- 
quaint the student with the tools of the management 
scientist. Robert M. Brown 

Mq 299 Independent Study (F, S; 3) 

The student works with an individual professor on a mutually 
agreed upon topic. An oral and written presentation is required. 
By arrangement The Department 

Mq 370 Operations Analysis (S; 3) 

Prerequisite: Mq 021 

This course applies analytical concepts to the management of 
operating systems, focusing on economic and strategic implica- 
tions of major operating decisions facing managers. Drawing pri- 
marily on case studies, the course emphasizes the development 
of reasonable and viable courses of action based on thorough 
analyses of complex operating problems. Suggested alternatives 
are subjected to rigorous evaluation for the degree to which they 
are supported by available data, their practicality and their likely 
ease of implementation in the organization. Case situations in- 
clude issues of production, marketing and financial decision- 
making and actions are based on information reported within the 
organization, particularly accounting data. The analytical tech- 
niques demonstrated in the case discussions are helpful for stu- 
dents who see their careers as operating managers within any 
functional area. Mary Louise Hatten 

Mq 375 Systems Management 

Prerequisites: Mq 021 or equivalent 

This course has as its central theme the application of the problem 
solving and decision-making process to the operating system of 
any organization. The systems approach relates both principles 
of analysis and principles of synthesis to the management activ- 



ities of planning and control. A generalized input-process-output 
model of a system is used to integrate the analytic tools available 
to the operations manager. Thus the use of modern theory and 
methodology provides the student with the ability to adjust to 
the specific processing system of any industry or activity, and 
with the skill to manage the details of any applied 
technology. John E. Van Tassel 

Mq 384 Applied Statistics 

An introduction to the theory and use of linear statistical models 
particularly as they are applied to the analysis of data for fore- 
casting and experimental analysis. An elementary statistics 
course is a prerequisite; an acquaintance with linear algebra and 
the ability to use a computer are desirable. The Department 

Mq 604 Operations Research 

Presents the concepts and techniques of linear optimization in- 
cluding linear, integer and dynamic programming. Essentially the 
course deals with the optimization of linear functions subject to 
linear constraints with special attention given to formulation and 
post-optimality analysis. Some mathematical fluency is necessary 
and the ability to use a computer is very helpful. 

Peter Olivieri 
Michael Bubin 

Mq 605 Simulation Methods (F; 3) or (S; 3) 

An introduction to building computer models of decision making 
systems. Students will be required to design and program a model 
of their choice. Specific computer languages used for simulation 
modelling will be discussed as well as the statistical concepts 
necessary for constructing such models. Application will be pre- 
sented from a variety of disciplines. Peter Olivieri 

Mq 606 Forecasting Techniques 

Prerequisites: Previous exposure to statistics and an ability to use 
computing facilities. 

The planning process is dependent on both forecasting ability 
and logical decision making. This course focuses on forecasting 
models of processes that occur in business, economics and the 
social sciences. The techniques presented include time series 
models, single equation regression models and multi-equation 
simulation models. The underlying theory is presented through 
real cases. The Department 

Mq 608 Cases in Management Science 

Prerequisites: A degree of mathematical literacy and the ability 
to use computing facilities. 

This course uses the case study method to show how and in what 
areas management sciences is being used to help solve business 
problems. A variety of topics and cases will be presented in order 
to produce students, who can, in their careers as managers, rec- 
ognize possible MS applications, appreciate the advantages and 
limitations of MS, and understand and intelligently employ MS 
tools. The areas to be covered comprise: (a) Credit Scoring (Dis- 
criminant Analysis) (b) Asset Liability Management (Linear Pro- 
gramming) (c) Inventory Management (Statistics) (d) Short Cases 
in Probability (e) Modeling in General. The Department 



School of 
Nursing 







School of Nursing 

Boston College inaugurated the School of Nursing in response to 
the need for a Catholic collegiate school of nursing in the Greater 
Boston area. With the cooperation of His Excellency, Most Rev- 
erend Richard J. Cushing, D.C., Archbishop of Boston, a program 
was offered in February, 1947 leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing or Nursing Education to Registered Nurses. 
In September, 1952, this program was limited to courses leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. In September, 
1947, a basic collegiate program of five years leading to a diploma 
in nursing and the degree of Bachelor of Science was introduced 
for high school graduates. Beginning in September, 1950, a four 
calendar-year basic collegiate program was initiated, and in 1957 
this was shortened to four academic years. 

In the spring of 1960 the School of Nursing moved to the 
University campus and occupies its own building, the gift of His 
Eminence Richard Cardinal Cushing. 

Philosophy and Objectives 

Boston College School of Nursing accepts and functions within 
the Christian humanist philosophy of Boston College, a Jesuit 
university which is committed to excellence in scholarship and 
service. Christian humanism views person as matter and spirit, 
capable of natural and supernatural perfection for union with 
God. Accordingly, truth is derived from empirical, rational, and 
faith experiences. Education based on Christian humanism em- 
phasizes the common intellectual heritage transmitted by the lib- 
eral arts including theology. The quest for and extension of 
knowledge occurs in a milieu of freedom and enthusiasm. Theory 
both precedes and accompanies action and Christian contempla- 
tion abounds into action. Thought is translated into action 
through sensitivity to the needs and concerns of the community. 

The School of Nursing participates in this spirit of inquiry and 
sensitivity to human values. Its faculty are a community of schol- 
ars and professionals engaged in the pursuit of excellence in 
nursing care, the transmission of nursing's traditional wisdom, 
and the creation of the future, both in research and planning for 
anticipated health care needs of society. 

The faculty believe, with Henderson and the International 
Council of Nurses (as stated in the sixth edition of Principles and 
Practice of Nursing), that nursing's unique function is assisting 
"individuals (sick or well) with those activities contributing to 
health, or its recovery (or to a peaceful death) and that they per- 
form unaided when they have the necessary strength, will, or 
knowledge; nursing also helps individuals carry out prescribed 
therapy and to be independent of assistance as soon as possible." 
The faculty believe that every person has a right to optimal health 
care and that nurses have a responsibility of providing care re- 
sponsive to the health needs of individuals. The faculty also be- 
lieve in the freedom and responsibility of the consumer of nursing 
and respect the choices that consumers make to bring about 
change in their environment in an attempt to reach their maxi- 
mum potential. 

Nursing courses are based on the liberal arts and sciences. 
Accordingly, students study the accumulated knowledge of the 
person and the universe along with other students at the univer- 
sity. Foremost among the outcome of this scholarship is the re- 
alization that basic values of Christian humanism operate amidst 
the ongoing dynamics of life. Another outcome is the participa- 
tion of students in the consumption and creation of knowledge 
and its meaning. Consequently, the students are able to make a 
commitment to humanity, their own and others, based on en- 
during values. 

Nursing education cultivates the development of a personal 
philosophy of nursing based upon the Judaeo-Christian values 
that support the worth of each individual. The educational en- 
vironment encourages individuals to think critically, communi- 
cate effectively, act responsibly, and to mature as creative and 
productive members of society. 

The development of nursing knowledge by the learner is rooted 
in the biophysical, philosophical/theological and social sciences. 
The spirit of inquiry, initiated with a grounding in the philo- 
sophical and scientific method, provides a base for nursing re- 
search and the nursing process. Theoretical content addresses 
cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning, proceeding from 



School of Nursing / 145 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

the simple to the complex, the general to the specific in appli- 
cation to the clinical experiences with individuals, groups, fam- 
ilies, and communities. Educational activities are planned to 
incorporate the individual learning needs of students. 

Student-initiated learning is encouraged, with emphasis placed 
upon periodic self-evaluation. Students are encouraged to become 
creative, flexible and productive members of the nursing profes- 
sion and society. The teaching-learning process permits students 
to further develop their abilities in verbal and written commu- 
nication of ideas. Further, the process fosters independence in 
thought that is carried out by action and involvement both in 
professional activities and service to society. 

The purposes of the School are to offer programs of excellence 
in undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education. 

The graduate of the undergraduate program will: 

1) develop and identify a personal philosophy of nursing 
practice based upon his or her values; 

2) synthesize theoretical and empirical knowledge from the 
physical and behavioral sciences and humanities with 
nursing theory and practice; 

3) use nursing process as a means of gathering data for re- 
fining and extending that practice by: 

a) assessing health status, 

b) planning and providing therapeutic nursing mea- 
sures on the basis of nursing diagnosis, 

c) purposefully interacting with others to promote well- 
ness, 

d) evaluating outcomes of nursing process, 

e) modifying practice as a result of research findings; 

4) collaborate with colleagues/citizens on the interdiscipli- 
nary health team to promote the health and welfare of 
people; 

5) utilize leadership skills through involvement with others 
in meeting health needs and nursing goals; 

6) work actively to promote needed change in systems of 
health care to insure optimal health services for each per- 
son; 

7) confront social issues which have implications for the 
health of society; 

8) take responsibility for continued personal and profes- 
sional growth. 

The curriculum is based on the conceptual framework of pre- 
ventive intervention which focuses on three levels of nursing 
care: primary preventive intervention, secondary preventive in- 
tervention, and tertiary preventive intervention. Primary preven- 
tive intervention is defined as nursing at that level of health 
promotion which focuses on the maintenance of optimal func- 
tioning (homeostasis, equilibrium, stability, organization) of in- 
dividuals and groups at all developmental stages. The student 
will have the knowledge and skills needed to discriminate health 
from illness (but not to discriminate among specific diseases) and 
to recognize those behaviors indicative of potential illness. The 
interventions will be collaborative in assisting the client to main- 
tain optimal health. 

Secondary preventive intervention is defined as nursing at that 
level of health promotion which focuses on adaptation during a 
disruption (disequilibrium, instability, disorganization, imbal- 
ance, illness, crises) of an individual's and/or group's health at 
all developmental stages. The student will have the knowledge 
and skills needed to identify disruptions in human function and 
the ability to formulate nursing interventions to promote adap- 
tation. 

Tertiary preventive intervention is defined as nursing at that 
level of health promotion which focuses on return to optimal 
health (reorganization, reequilibrium, rehabilitation, readapta- 
tion) within a system of limitations. The student will have the 
knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to assess the functional 
potential of individuals and groups at all developmental stages 
and to negotiate in restoring the client to optimal health function. 

Requirements for the Degree* 

The program combines liberal arts studies with professional nurs- 
ing courses and clinical experience. It is a four-year program 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in 
nursing. A total of 120 credits are required for graduation. 



146 / School of Nursing 

CURRICULUM PLAN 



Liberal arts subjects are emphasized in the first and most of the 
second years. During the third and fourth years, the student 
spends approximately two or three days each week gaining clin- 
ical experience at the various cooperative hospitals and agencies. 
The remainder of the week the student attends classes on the 
main university campus. The faculty of the School of Nursing is 
responsible for all instruction in nursing, both theory and prac- 
tice. The faculty of the appropriate university departments con- 
duct classes in the liberal arts subjects. 

The following university core requirements (36 credits) are to 
be fulfilled by all undergraduates over a four-year period: 

2 courses in Theology 

2 courses in Philosophy 

2 courses in Social Science (Psychology and Sociology) 

2 courses in History 

2 courses in Natural Sciences or Mathematics 

2 courses in English 

It is suggested that the history, philosophy, and English core 
requirements be taken in the freshman year since they are two- 
semester courses. A minimum of 120 credits are required. 

The School of Nursing reserves the right to alter any program 
or policy outlined in this BULLETIN. 

Curriculum Plan Effective Fall 1982 1 



-Anatomy & Physiology I 



Freshman Year 

SEMESTER I 
Bi 130, 131- 
Core 2 
Core 
Core 
Core 

SEMESTER II 

Ch 102, 104 — Fund of Organic Chemistry 

Bi 132, 133 — Anatomy & Physiology II 

Core 

Core 

Core 3 



■Microbiology 



Sophomore Year 4 

SEMESTER I 

Bi 220, 221- 

Core 

Core 

Core 

Elective 5 

SEMESTER II 

Nu 072— Scope of Human Development 

Nu 080 — Pathophysiology 

Nu 214 — Introduction to Nursing Research 

Elective 

Elective 

Junior Year 

SEMESTER I 

Nu 131 — Primary Preventive Intervention 

Nu 135 — Nursing Methodology 

Nu 201 — Secondary Preventive Intervention I 

SEMESTER II 

Nu 202 — Secondary Preventive Intervention II 
Nu 203 — Secondary Preventive Intervention III 
Nu 205 — Pharmacotherapeutics 
Elective 

Senior Year 

SEMESTER I 

Nu 208 — Secondary Preventive Intervention IV 
Nu 211 — Perspectives on Professional Nursing 
Elective 
Elective 

SEMESTER II 

Nu 209 — Secondary Preventive Intervention V 
Nu 215 — Tertiary Preventive Intervention 
Elective 



CREDITS 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 

4 
4 
3 
3 
3 



CREDITS 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



CREDITS 
4 
5 
6 

5 
5 
2 
3 



CREDITS 
6 
3 
3 
3 

5 
6 
3 



1 The basic curriculum design may be subject to modification and 
revision from time to time. 

2 It is strongly recommended that students finish history, philos- 
ophy, and English core requirements as early as possible. 

3 Psychology and sociology must be taken as a social science core 
and must be completed prior to enrollment in Nu 131 and Nu 
135. 

4 One-half of student enrollment will start the nursing sequence 
during the Spring Semester of the sophomore year; the remaining 
half of student enrollment will start the nursing sequence during 
the Fall Semester of the junior year. 

5 Only one nursing elective is permitted for degree credit. 

Registered Nurse Candidates 

Registered nurses who wish to obtain a baccalaureate degree may 
apply for admission to the Admissions Office of Boston College. 
Applicants must be graduates of or in the final year of a diploma 
or associate degree program offered by a state-approved school 
of nursing. No application can be processed by the Admissions 
Committee and given final review until all of the following in- 
formation has been submitted on official Boston College forms: 

1. The preliminary application 

2. Personal data form 

3. High school transcripts 

4. An official transcript from a school of nursing 

5. An official transcript of courses completed at a 
college or university if applicable 

6. Two letters of recommendation: one academic and one 
from an employer or clinical supervisor 

7. Evidence of physical exam, completed by the applicant's 
physician, upon admission. 

Registered nurse students are accepted only for September ad- 
mission. Although May 15 is the application deadline, applicants 
are encouraged to complete admission activities as early as pos- 
sible as exemption examinations begin in June. While full-time 
study by RN students is encouraged, part-time study is possible. 

Registered nurses may transfer credit to Boston College from 
other accredited colleges and universities. Credit will be accepted 
for courses in which a grade of C- or above was attained and 
which are equivalent to those offered at Boston College. Credit 
received for specific nursing courses is not transferable. No more 
than sixty (60) credits are accepted for transfer. 

Once admitted to the School of Nursing, registered nurse stu- 
dents may take exemption examinations in the following courses 
and receive the designated course credit if a passing mark is 
achieved. These examinations are offered in: Anatomy and Phys- 
iology, Chemistry, Microbiology, and in several selected nursing 
courses. Specific information regarding examinations is provided 
upon admission. Registered nurse candidates may receive partial 
credit for designated nursing courses through the placement pro- 
cess. A Massachusetts Registered Nurse license is a prerequisite 
to enrollment in any course with a clinical component. In ad- 
dition, all registered nurse students are required to obtain per- 
sonal malpractice insurance during clinical semesters. For complete 
information please refer to the Boston College School of Nursing 
brochure: The Registered Nurse And The Baccalaureate Program. 

Academic Regulations 

Requirement for Good Standing and Eligibility 

The standing of a student is determined by a weighted semester 
average. At the conclusion of each semester each student's record 
is reviewed. 

A student must achieve a minimum grade of D- in all courses 
and a cumulative average of at least C- in nursing courses, as 
well as an overall cumulative average of C- in order to remain 
enrolled in the nursing program. A student may repeat any nurs- 
ing course only once at which time he or she must achieve the 
minimum acceptable grade as stated above. Because theory and 
practice are closely related, a student who fails either component 
of a nursing course must repeat both of them simultaneously. 

A student who fails to demonstrate performance consistent 
with professional nursing will be subject to review and to possible 
dismissal by the faculty of the School of Nursing. 



School of Nursing / 147 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



Normal Student Load 

Students registered for twelve semester-hours credit are consid- 
ered full-time students. Students carrying more than seventeen 
credits in a semester will be charged for a course overload. Usu- 
ally fifteen credits are carried each semester. 

In a nursing course, one semester credit in a lecture course 
represents one hour of class per week per semester. One semester 
credit in a clinical laboratory nursing course represents three 
hours of clinical experience per week per semester. 

Class Attendance 

As part of their responsibility in their college experience, students 
are expected to attend classes regularly. Students who are absent 
from class or clinical laboratory will be evaluated by faculty re- 
sponsible for the course to ascertain their ability to achieve the 
course objectives and to decide their ability to continue in the 
course. 

A student who is absent from a class is responsible for the class 
content as well as any announcements and assignments made. 
If a student is absent from a scheduled or previously announced 
examination, it is the prerogative of the faculty to determine 
whether or not a make-up examination will be given. There is a 
charge of $15.00 for the administration of a make-up examination. 
Under ordinary circumstances arrangements for make-up exam- 
inations must be made within one week of the student's return 
to school. 

In relation to clinical laboratory experience, it is the respon- 
sibility of the student to notify the instructor and/or the clinical 
agency if the student will be late or absent. Absences from the 
clinical laboratory will be reviewed by faculty for appropriate 
action. When a student is absent because of illness, a statement 
from the family physician may be required before the student 
will be permitted to return to clinical courses. If it is necessary 
for a student to make-up clinical time, a tutorial fee may be re- 
quired. 

In cases of anticipated prolonged absence for illness or injury, 
the student or family member should contact the Dean of Students 
and the Dean of the School of Nursing so that academic and other 
necessary arrangements can be made. 

IN ALL COURSES WITH NURSING NUMBERS, REQUIRE- 
MENTS FOR ATTENDANCE AT CLASS AND IN CLINICAL 
PRACTICE ARE THE PREROGATIVE OF THE INSTRUCTOR IN 
THAT COURSE. 

Academic Integrity 

Nursing students are expected to have high standards of integrity 
in both the academic and clinical settings. Students who misrep- 
resent their work in papers, examinations, or clinical experience, 
as a minimum, will receive no credit for the course requirement 
involved. In addition, a written statement of the incident will be 
placed in their file, and they will be subject to dismissal from the 
School of Nursing. 

Degree with Honors 

Latin honors accompanying the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science are awarded in three grades according to the 
cumulative average attained by full-time attendance: Summa cum 
Laude, with Highest Honors, is awarded to students with a cu- 
mulative average of 3.667 or above; Magna cum Laude, with High 
Honors, to those with averages between 3.333 and 3.666; and 
Cum Laude, with Honors, to those with averages between 2.900 
and 3.332. 

Beginning with the class of 1983 Honors will be awarded on 
a percentage basis. The degree will be awarded Summa cum 
Laude to the top 4.5% of the graduating class, Magna cum Laude 
to the next 9.5% and Cum Laude to the next 15%. 

Special Academic Programs 

Continuing Education Opportunities 

Through the Continuing Education Unit of the School of Nursing, 
a variety of short-term courses and workshops are offered 



throughout the academic year to registered nurses. These offer- 
ings are not part of formal degree programs but are designed to 
assist the nurse in maintaining professional knowledge and skills. 
Details about these offerings can be obtained from the Director 
of the Continuing Education Unit of the School of Nursing. 

General Information 

Academic Grievances 

Any student who believes he or she has been treated unfairly in 
academic matters should consult with the Chairperson of the 
Undergraduate Program or the Dean to discuss the situation and/ 
or to obtain information about relevant appeal procedures. 

Physical Examinations 

All undergraduate students in the School of Nursing are required 
to have a complete physical examination, including tine test and/ 
or chest x-ray and rubella titre prior to admission. Also, evidences 
of screening for tuberculosis must be submitted by August 15, 
prior to the beginning of each academic year, to the Director of 
Health Services. Additional physical examinations and/or other 
health data may be required by the School of Nursing. 

Financial Information 

Boston College is not an endowed institution. Therefore, it is 
normally dependent for support and development on the fees 
paid for tuition and other collegiate requirements. 

School of Nursing students pay the same tuition, fees and board 
and room costs as other college enrollees. In addition nursing 
students have the following expenses: 

Annual Malpractice Insurance $15.00 

(payable Fall Semester of junior and senior years 
and Spring Semester for sophomores enrolled 
in Primary Preventive Intervention) 

Regulation School of Nursing Uniforms $100.00 

(payable Fall Semester of sophomore year) 

Standardized Examination Fees $10.00 

Transportation to Clinical Agencies 

Experiences in a wide variety of hospitals, clinics and other 
health-related agencies are a vital part of the nursing program. 
The facilities utilized for these experiences are located in Boston 
and neighboring areas. Students are responsible for providing for 
their own transportation to and from those facilities. 

Cooperating H